How Often To Water a Cactus: Essential Guide

How Often To Water Cactus

If you were to ask anyone to describe the cacti plants in the simplest way, they will most possibly include the words; thick, spiked, dry and desert. And in that simple definition, you will conclude that these plants are sturdy plants that can survive unrelenting climatic conditions. Nothing here is disputable. As a matter of fact, every character mentioned so far is correct. However, it’s not the only description these lovely plants deserve.

Most people actually fail to realize that cactus plants are a very vast and broad family of plants with more than 100 differing species under its belt. One kind is unique to the next, but all share a similarity of having thick, plump, fleshy stems. And another awesome thing about cacti is that they can survive almost all environments making suitable for household planting. As long as all their needs are met, they could add sparkle to your house window sill or your office desktop. Check out “9 Types of Cacti” to see more kinds of cacti out there.

How Often To Water Cactus
Spiral Cactus @ohiotropics

Why Cacti Love Water So Much!

Just like other plants, cacti need water for their survival. Their characteristic, fleshy appearance is as a result of the presence of h20 within its cells. The mere factor that they are hardy plants and are quite low-maintenance presents itself as both a blessing and a curse. A blessing in that, for one with not so much time for plant care in their hands, they can still keep the little beauties. And a curse in that there is a thin line between under and overwatering them. Take a look at “When You Should Water Your Succulents” for more tips on watering your cactus. And many are the times we face the predicament on how often to water them. Well, we assure you that it is not as mindbending as you presume, but more straightforward than you could ever imagine!

Be sure to check out our Ebook “The Correct Way to Water Succulents” for a full guide to watering your succulents.

Factors That Influence The Watering Schedule Of Your Cactus

The Soil Composition

These plants flourish in a well-draining, sufficiently ventilated coarse, gritty, loose, sandy soil. The soil must be light-weight with a minimal composition of organic matter. And we all know that mixing water and decomposing matter is a bad idea. It promotes root rot, eventually killing your cactus crop. The porous nature of your soil mix encourages fast water flowing such that the soil dries faster, allowing proper aeration. This means the more granular your soil mix is, the more frequent the watering.

Don’t know what root rot is? Well take a look at “What is Root Rot & How Do You Fix It?” for more info to protecting your succulents from rotting.

How Often To Water Cactus
Flowering Cactus @amazing__plants

The Season

Of the four seasons, cacti plants thrive in the warmer ones: summer and spring when the watering is mostly done. This is because, during these seasons, the atmosphere is hotter. Consequently, the evaporation of water from the soil and the plant itself is at its highest making the soil dry. The colder seasons, however, the air is cooler, and evaporation is on the lower side; hence, the soil will lose less water. Undespitudedly, the watering is more frequent during the warmer seasons as compared to the colder seasons.

Check out how some succulents are able to survive in desert conditions like parts of Mexico in “5 Most Popular Succulents From Mexico“.

The Cactus Growing Cycle

Every plant has a time in their life cycle that the growth is most active and durations when they go into dormancy. The productive seasons is when the plant grows upwards, blooms and even produces seeds giving rise to new offsprings. On the other hand, during their dormancy, the plants’ growth slows down and preserves its energy getting ready for the active periods. And this influences how often one should water the cactus. This, consequently, goes without saying that irrigation is more frequent during its production cycle.

Additionally, younger cacti plants require more water because of their faster growth rate. Thinking of growing those succulent plants at home? Check out “How to Successfully Grow Indoor Succulents” for more.

Location Of The Cactus Plant

This simply entails where the plant has been cultivated; indoors, outdoors, in a planter, or the ground. A cactus plant grown outside will be watered more regularly because of moving air which carries moisture from the soil. As compared to its counterpart grown indoors, where the wind does not move more freely in the confinements of walls. Cacti plants borne in containers and the ground are both watered when the soil becomes dry. But the rate at which the dirt dries will be determined by other weather conditions. Notwithstanding, watering must be done to bypass the drying off of your plant. Take a look at “5 Succulents You can Grow in a Coffee Mug” for techniques in growing your succulent in different places.

ALSO READ:

How Often To Water Cactus
Echeveria Setosa Deminuta @nurcan.srbs

Exposure To Light

It has been known that light goes hand in hand with the production of heat energy. This means that the more the exposure, the more radiation is produced, and the faster the transpiration and evaporation. A cactus plant and the soil exposed longer will, therefore, lose more water. And that dictates that the irrigation will be done more often since the soil will dry faster. Plants bred under grow lights will go by the same principle. The more the exposure, the more the watering. Do you grow your cactus under a grow light? Check out “Best Grow Lights Reviewed by Succulent Lovers”.

Be sure to check out our Ebook “Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth” for a full tutorial in lighting for your plants.

Humidity

The higher the humidity, the lower the rate of evaporation. And the lower the humidity, the higher the dissipation. Humid air contains a large amount of moisture within itself, which simply means there will be no space for evaporated water to occupy. And the vice-versa is so in a dry humid atmosphere.

Size Of Cacti Plant

A bigger cactus plant has a smaller surface area to volume ratio, which decreases the amount of water that is evaporated. More miniature cactus, on the other hand, lose much water, meaning they will require more watering. Want to know more about larger sized cactus, go to “3 Popular Large Succulents You Don’t Have” for more.

Type and Size Of Pot

The size of the pot will determine the number of times you will water your cactus in a week. Bigger containers with more soil mix will obviously need a higher water volume to wet the entire cactus pot. Although one should make sure the soil is porous not to harbor any extra water.

What the container will also influence is the rate at which you will water your crops. For instance, terracotta pots have porous walls that seep up water, which is evaporated through their walls. This dramatically reduces the time the potting mix takes to dry out completely.

Plastic containers, on the other hand, trap moisture, increasing the time duration between watering.

ALSO READ:

How Often To Water Cactus
Indoor Garden @tiendafloralia

Just like other succulents, a cactus plant should never be misted using spray bottles. Instead, they are watered in two ways. First, the pot is put inside a saucer with water and let to soak water up. The second method, and most common is watering the crop by soaking the soil surface. You should never water the plant overhead. Water contact with the plant should be at a minimum to avoid the onset of mold.

Thank you for reading! Let us know in the comments below how you care for your cactus during the summer or spring season. Be sure to also check out related content for your gardening needs in “Repotting Succulents— the Right Way“, “6 Best Fertilizers for Succulents”, or “Best Gardening Tools for Succulents“.

Did this article on how often to water cacti help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor” or even “6 Most Important Tips to Grow Succulents”  today! 

Happy planting! ?

The Dangers of an Underwatered Succulent

Dangers of an Underwatered Succulent

It is quite hard to starve a succulent of water. Hard, but not impossible. As long as your succulent is not getting everything it needs to thrive, it will start to show in several ways. You may notice your plant look a little ‘pathetic’ and ‘sad’ as if it is calling out to you for some care. Immediately you notice something out of the ordinary, you need to do a quick assessment as to what could be going wrong.

Succulents are desert plants, used to growing in harsh conditions where not much water is available or minimal. Unlike other house plants, you are not likely to be hovering over your succulent with a watering can on a daily basis. Once you have started keeping succulents, you will find that you water them once every few weeks. This would be in the warmer months. In winter, or when it is cold, you may go several months without watering your succulents. Be sure to also check out “When You Should Water Your Succulents” for a full guide on when and how to water your succulent.

Dangers of an Underwatered Succulent
Underwatered Succulent Dangers @my_succulent_life

Recommendation

The best advice on watering succulents is to keep an eye on the soil. Once the top one inch of the soil is fully dried out, it is time for a little and not much water. If you do not have a clear schedule in place, you could easily forget to water your plants. The result of this – underwatered succulents.

In the worst-case scenario, an underwatered succulent could die. Before it gets to this point, it will pass through various stages. Here is what to watch out for to identify the dangers of an underwatered succulent.

The Shrivel and the Wrinkle on the Leaves

Succulents are succulents because they are excellent at storing water within themselves. It is the retained water within the cells that gives the leaves of these plants the thick, juicy, and healthy look. When these plants do not get enough water, the leaves begin to shrivel up and get wrinkled. The leaves do this due to a drop in the internal water pressure in the leaves and stems, as they begin to feed on their reserves to get water.

However, there is a disclaimer when it comes to shriveling. It really depends on which of the leaves have shriveled up. If it is the leaves that are close to the bottom, it may be an indication that they are old rather than the plant is underwatered. Here, the rest of the leaves will appear to be in perfect health. If you notice the older leaves shriveling up, simply removing them is the solution. Check out other potential dangers in your succulent garden in “What is Root Rot & How Do You Fix it?“.

Dangers of an Underwatered Succulent
The Stems & Leaves @lifetimesucculents

The Fold or the Curve

Succulents come in all shapes and sizes. There are those whose leaves are not fleshy, instead, they are long and slim. For example, the leaves of an Aloe Vera. In this case, when the plant is underwatered, the leaves will curve into themselves or will fold up. This reduces the surface area of the leaf, meaning that less water will be lost from the plant.

Other plants like Echeverias also appear to ‘close’ when they are underwatered. The appearance they have is more curved than opened out at this stage. This means that the rosettes leave become more tightly packed to retain moisture.

Take a look also at “How to Tell If Your Cactus is Dying” if you have a cactus at home.

Dying Roots

You can normally revive a succulent plant that is underwatered by offering it water over a period of one to two weeks. However, this will only happen if the roots of the plant are alive. If you have not watered your succulent plants for so long that the soil appears to be cracked and hard, and the leaves are all close to death, the roots may be affected as well. Dying roots are unable to feed the plant as it needs which will cause it to die. Once you have dying roots, there is normally no turning back to get the plant to good health.

Aerial Roots

Underwatered succulent plants may need more support to help them remain upright. This is when you may notice aerial roots forming. These are roots that will form above the soil line. They do this so that they can try and get some water molecules from the air to feed the plant since there is not enough in the soil. When a plant needs physical support, these roots ensure that succulent plants that may have a leaning stem is protected from bending too far or breaking off as it bends towards the ground.

ALSO READ:

Dangers of an Underwatered Succulent
Note the Formation of Aerial Roots @kyan.s_gardens

Different To the Touch

An underwatered succulent will feel different to the touch. This plant will have leaves that are much softer than they are supposed to be. When the leaves are at their optimum hydration, they tend to be quite firm. The same applies to the leaves which will typically start drying at the base of the plant. When taking their natural course from life to death, the leaves at the base of the succulentplants will discolor and shrivel. However, when underwater, they will have distinct thinness and will also feel crisp and dry to the touch.

No Flowers

If you have been keeping succulents for some time, you will know their flowering patterns. If it seems like your succulent is not flowering, the reason may simply be that your plant does not have enough water. When the plant has inadequate water, it focuses on survival more than the beauty of flowering.

Take a look at “Succulents With Yellow Flowers“, “Succulents with Orange Flowers“, or “5 Succulents with Red Flowers” for a variety of succulents with beautiful flowers on top.

Dangers of an Underwatered Succulent
Start Focusing on Existence @euamoosuculentas

The moment you notice that your succulent is underwatered, water it and observe over a couple of weeks. It should come back to life, and look like normal within this time.

Remember, drainage is key. Not having any drainage on your pot or planter will result in water retention. This may further accentuate underwatering, as plant owner believes the succulent has enough water even when there may be none available.

The most complex part of caring for a succulent is watering, making sure there is just enough at the right time. Killing a succulent by underwatering is a tough undertaking, as, for the most part, a little water will revive your plant and go a long way.

Thank you for reading with us today! Let us know in the comments below your techniques to watering your succulents. Also, be sure to check out our Instagram or Facebook for more inspiration in the world of succulents.

Before you go, we want to share something exciting with you. Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics like Indoor & Outdoor Succulents to Essential Tools. With our ebooks, you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Happy planting!! ?

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave Ovatifolia

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia

If you are looking for a succulent to fill up your outdoor garden space or to line up your driveway, then the Agave is probably the succulent you are looking for.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Whale Tongue Garden @og_agave

The Whale’s Tongue

The Whale’s Tongue type of the Agave Genus succulents is an evergreen perennial succulent that grows up to 5 feet above the ground and acquires a maximum width of 6 feet. The succulent’s foliage grows into a rounded rosette of short, broad grey leaves that take up a distinctively cupped shape. The leaves have teeth-like smaller spikes along its edges. At the center of the rosettes grows a 1-inch dark grey terminal spine that holds the flower of the plant. During the flowering season, the spine grows to a height of 14 feet above the ground with greenish-yellow flowers at the top.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Agave ovatifolia and Sedum ‘Lemon Ball’ @greenlakenurseryt

Geographical And Name Origin

The Agave Ovatifolia traces its nativity to the North American regions of Mexico. The specific name of this succulent comes from the Latin words ‘ovatus’ for “egg” and ‘folius’ for “leaves.” The title refers to the broad ovate leaves and the common name, whale’s tongue agave, also describes the leaf shape.

Take a look at other succulents from Mexico in “5 Most Popular Succulents From Mexico”.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Whale Tongue in Nature @botanizeme

How To Care For Whale’s Tongue Succulent

The Whale’s Tongue species is a hardy crop that does not require hands-on and around the clock care. The succulent is a slow-growing yet dramatic plant and will thrive in a bit of neglect. The plant is easy to grow, even under the harshest of conditions.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Whale Tongue doesn’t require much attention @cyphouter

Propagation

This species is propagated either by seed or by bulbils. Unlike the rest in the genus that are generated by offsets. The spreads are collected after the flowering phase has ended. Although this may take a while, owing to the fact that this species is a perennial succulent. Meaning they live long lives of three or more years. The flowering mostly takes place on their second year of growth, and they die off after the blooming phase is over.

Check out our EbookThe Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully” for a full guide on propagating your succulents correctly.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Agave ovatifolia @og_agave

Best Soil Mix

The Whale’s Tongue species does well in any fast-draining, well-ventilated, and well-fertilized soil mix. This succulent does well in almost all soil pH values. Although their preference lies on the neutral rocky and sandy soils. Just like most of its counterparts’ succulent plants, the shallow roots need to be periodically in contact with moisture and air. The ideal growing medium should be coarse, gritty, and lightweight as compact soil inhibits air circulation. Compact soil also promotes waterlogging, which may lead to the roots rotting. Check out “What is Root Rot & How Do You Fix it?” for more tips on taking care of your succulent pot.

ALSO READ:

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Whale Tongue environment @botanizeme

Best Lighting Conditions

This succulent flourishes in either full exposure or partial sunlight. The hotter the climate, the more shade they require. Otherwise, if exposure is too intense, the leaves grow tilted upwards compacting the rosette, making them appear smaller. This is evident as in the hotter seasons the succulent grows smaller and widens as the temperatures lower as you approach the much colder seasons of autumn and winter.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Blueish tone Agave @sacredelements

Best Watering Conditions

The Agave Ovatifolia watering schedule is more frequent when the plant is in its early life stages. At this growing phase, the watering is done every four to five days a month. But as it matures the exercise is spaced out to at least once or twice a month. At maturity, the watering is done scarcely owing to the fact that this succulent is drought resistant. If the plant is on a larger scale, an irrigation system is ideal for watering. But in the case it is on a smaller and more manageable size, using a water hose to thoroughly soak the soil with water once or twice a month is ideal.

The watering is, however, done according to the weather. The watering is ideally best during the summer when the plant experiences it’s most active phase. But during the winter watering is reduced only to maintain the turgidity of the leaves, and is done only when the soil is dried.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Cacti Garden @hamiltongardens

Fertilizer Application

This particular species does not require any fertilizer application as long as the soil mix is well maintained. However, if one intends to maximize its growth in the shortest time possible a 10:10:10 fertilizer is the most suitable choice. The best way to administer the fertilizer into the soil is by diluting the fertilizer with water. And applying it as you water your succulent.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
5 ft. Whale Tongue @agaveobsessed

Pest And Disease Control

The Agave Ovatifolia’s hardiness plays to the advantage that the succulent is tolerant to most pests. The exception, however, is the agave snout weevil that burrows into the center of the plant and lays its eggs there. This disrupts a healthy crop’s basic needs by damaging the tissues and results in the collapse of the succulent. Unfortunately, the pest infestation is noticed long after too much damage has been done. The grower then has no choice but to entirely uproot the succulent and kill all the grub to avoid further spread of the pest infestation.

As a preventive measure, consider completely quarantining the younger succulents. Consider repotting them into a new soil mix, disposing of the old soil mix. Need more tips to repot your succulents? Check out “Repotting Succulents— the Right Way” for a full guide.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Whale Tongue in the shade @denray3

Pruning

The pruning of your whale’s tongue succulent is ideally done at the end of the winter season to give space to new growth. The central aspect of trimming off is to avoid overcrowding of the leaves, reshaping the crop and the removal of dead leaves. As well as eliminating any other damaged spears to create more room. The cutting should be done using a clean, sharp knife to make clean cuts to reduce the eventuality of bacteria, fungi, or virus entry into the crop. Check out these shears we found just for this cutting task.

Take great caution, though to avoid over trimming. Cutting too much of the succulent stresses the plant impeding its ability to store water. Therefore, besides pruning the affected leaves, cut only the healthy ones only if they pose a danger to passersby.

Be sure also to wear protective gloves as the succulent contains a sap that tends to irritate the skin on contact. Also, wear protective gear such as an overall to protect your hands and legs from being scratched by the sharp tips.

Be sure to also check out “How To Prune Succulents” for more guide to pruning your Whale’s Tongue.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Outdoor Whale’s Tongue Repotted @nancylovesnature

Repotting

Repotting an Agave Ovatifolia is not necessary in case it is in the ground. But if the area is susceptible to disease or pest infestation, then repotting may be a necessity. To repot, you require the right soil mix that is well-drained and well ventilated. Secondly, you will need the right tools to carry out the activity, such as the proper attire, a sharp knife, a hand trowel, and for the bigger, more mature ones, a shovel.

First, you moisten the soil before uprooting the succulent. Then gently, remove the dirt away from the plant’s roots to dislodge the crop slowly and carefully using your hands. Slowly remove the plant from the ground and gently remove the excess dirt from the roots. Next, you place the plant into the new soil and plant it shallowly and keep the crown above the soil line. And after you have wholly anchored your crop, water the succulent entirely and provide it with ample sunshine.

This activity should ideally be done during the active phase of the succulent so that the plant can flourish in the shortest time possible. Take a look at “Best Gardening Tools for Succulents” for more tips on repotting your succulents.

What Is A Whale’s Tongue? Agave ovatifolia
Succulent Outside @thedangergarden

Safety Measures

Owing to the fact that the Whale’s Tongue species have sharp tips on their leaves that edged with teeth like tapered sections, a few safety measures need to be watched. Whether the succulent is on a large scale or small scale, it should be planted away from foot traffic. The needle-sharp leaf tips are a hazard to both humans and pets. The plant, therefore, should not be planted along walkways and paths. But instead may be grown further into the garden or behind a well-fenced garden.

Caution is observed when handling the replanting, pruning, or repotting of the succulent. The handler should be well dressed in a long-sleeved shirt, have long pants on, well-covered shoes, sturdy gloves, and safety glasses when handling this succulent. Above all, they should take great caution not to injure themselves when carrying out the activities mentioned above.


So now that you know quite a bit about the Whale’s Tongue succulent, you can now confidently grow one on your lawn and take care of it the best way you can. It is not as hard as you thought, right!

Thank you for reading with us! Find out about more exciting outdoor succulents in “3 Popular Large Succulents You Don’t Have” or “5 Best Outdoor Succulents“. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook or Instagram for more succulent-loving fun. We’ll see you there.

If you liked this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.Check out our collection of 12 ebooks here!

Happy Planting! ?

Full Guide to Watering Succulents – When, How & Why

how to water succulents
How to water succulents images Succulents Box

Succulents can survive in arid regions because of their ability to store water in their roots, stems, and leaves.

For this reason, many persons tend to overlook the fact that they need to water their succulents when planted in their homes. That said, to keep your succulents blooming, it is best to water them regularly.

In this article, you will learn how to water succulents plants indoors or outdoors, as well as how you can see if you are overwatering your succulents.

How to Water Succulents Indoors

Instead of just spritzing your indoor succulents, soak them to the extent that water gushes out from the drainage holes beneath the pot. Before watering your succulents again, ensure that the soil is parched.

According to Bryce Lane, a horticulturist from North Carolina State University, check the soil after a week of watering to see if it is dry. If it is not, wait one or two more weeks. When watering indoor succulents, ensure that water does not get on top of the leaves to prevent rot.

Another thing to note about watering succulents planted indoors is that they need the most amount of water during the spring when they are still growing. You can reduce the amount of water during the summer and even more during the winter. During the winter, succulents are in dormancy and do not get plenty of light, and so, their water requirement reduces.

How to Water Succulents in Outdoor Containers

During the summer, you can place your potted succulents outdoors. Give your succulents the chance to adjust to varying temperature levels by placing them in a shaded environment before moving to a brighter area, this required to ensure your succulents are not exposed to direct sunlight.

The best kits for watering outdoor succulents are squeeze bottles and spout watering cans. Use any of these kits to pour water onto the soil until it is properly soaked—from the top of the pot to the bottom. After that, wait until the soil dries out completely before watering the succulents again.

How to Water Succulents in the Ground

Succulents such as Opuntia, Sedum, and Agave can survive harsh weather conditions, especially the fully grown ones with stronger roots. Both hardy and annual succulents need to be planted in well-drained soil. According to Lane, planting succulents in stagnant water is an exercise in futility.

Creating a 2-foot mound of organic-based compost with a mixture of PermaTill will allow your succulents to flourish even if they find themselves somewhere different from their native environment. A good soaking, good soil, and good drainage are essential for growing healthy succulents.

How Often Should I Water My Succulents?

Now that you know how to water indoor and outdoor succulents, the next question on your mind will be how often you should water your succulents? Well, to answer your question, first, note that there is no rigid watering schedule for you to follow.

The watering frequency depends on the type of succulent, the size of your pot, and the weather conditions in your area. The smaller the pot, the less moisture it can accommodate. Hence, the more frequently it needs to be watered.

A good watering frequency that most indoor succulent growers adopt is watering 14 – 21 days at the early stage. Ensure that you do not overwater your succulents to avoid rot.

You can use a tool called Succulent Tracker App (only iOS version available currently). This app are useful to remind your watering schedule, as well as to avoid under-watering and overwatering, .

Signs Your Succulent is Thirsty

Even though succulents are recommended to be dry before watering, ensure that you do not dehydrate them in the process. Once you notice any wrinkles and shriveled leaves, it is a sign that you need to water your succulents.

As the cells of your succulents try to transfer their stored moisture to other parts, they also try to accumulate more water to make up for the amount they have lost. But then, if the water is not available to replace what was lost, the cells begin to contract gradually, making the leaves that used to flourish shrivel.

Signs Your Succulent Has Been Overwatered

The danger of overwatering succulents is that it damages the cell structure, roots, and leaves.

The first and most common sign of overwatering to take note of is discoloration. Once you notice the leaves are becoming soft, translucent, and squishy, know that you have been overwatering the succulents. Unlike under-watered succulents, leaves that contract overwatered succulents leaves will be dropped.

While succulents can recover from overwatering, it is not all that easy. A great way to save overwatered succulents is to plant a new one with the cuttings to root and leaves.

1 moment for promotion: Our new eBook The Correct Way to Water Succulents is out for sale 🙂 If you want a really simple guide with many useful tips for watering succulents, this eBook is right there for you. See it now!

Signs of a Healthy Succulent

First off, plants will always tell you when they are in need of something. But sadly, not everyone knows how to read the signs.

While squishy leaves discoloration tells you that you are overwatering your succulents, shriveled leaves show that you are under-watering your succulents.

Hens and Chicks plants tend to shut down older, lower leaves as they grow. While this is a natural phenomenon that is part of the growth process, the leaves do not wither. They just become very thin, papery, and brownish. Prone these leaves to keep your succulents looking fresh.

All in all, when watering your succulents, you have to consider the soil and the environment. Follow the watering guidelines we mentioned in this article, and your succulents will keep blooming even under the most adverse conditions.

How to Water Succulent Plants

How to Water Succulent Plants-SC
Watered Succulent Plant Image

Succulents can survive in arid regions because of their ability to store water in their roots, stems, and leaves. For this reason, many persons tend to overlook the fact that they need to water their succulents when planted in their homes. That said, to keep your succulents blooming, it is best to water them regularly.
In this article, you will get to know how to water succulents plants indoors or outdoors correctly, as well as how you can see if you are overwatering your succulents.

How to Water Succulent Plants-SC
Watering Succulent Image
How to Water Succulent Plants-How to Water Succulents Indoors-SC
Watering Succulents Indoor Image: IG@sunnyplants_com

How to Water Succulents Indoors?

Instead of just spritzing your indoor succulents, soak them to the extent that water gushes out from the drainage holes beneath the pot. Before watering your succulents again, ensure that the soil is parched. According to Bryce Lane, a horticulturist from North Carolina State University, check the soil after a week of watering to see if it is dry. If it is not, wait one or two more weeks. When watering indoor succulents, ensure that water does not get on top of the leaves to prevent rot.
Another thing to note about watering succulents planted indoors is that they need the most water during the spring when they are still growing. You can reduce the amount of water during the summer and even more during the winter. It is because, during the winter, succulents are in dormancy and do not get plenty of light, and so, their water requirement reduces.

How to Water Succulent Plants-How to Water Succulents in Outdoor Containers-SC
Watering Can used: IG@sucstu

How to Water Succulents in Outdoor Containers?

During the summer, you can place your potted succulents outdoors. Give your succulents the chance to adjust to varying temperature levels by placing them in a shaded environment before moving to a brighter area. That said, ensure that your succulents are not exposed to direct sunlight, especially during midday.
Outdoor succulents require more water and indoor succulents. What’s more, the water will dry faster because it is exposed to more sunlight and air.

The best kits for watering outdoor succulents are squeeze bottles and spout watering cans. Use any of these kits to pour water onto the soil until it is adequately soaked—from the top of the pot to the bottom. After that, wait until the soil dries out completely before watering the succulents again.

How to Water Succulent Plants-How to Water Succulents in the Ground-SC
Watering Ground Succulents: IG@nedsinanoqui

How to Water Succulents in the Ground?


Succulents such as Opuntia, Sedum, and Agave can survive harsh weather conditions, especially the fully grown ones with stronger roots. Both hardy and annual succulents need to be planted in well-drained soil. According to Lane, planting succulents in stagnant water is an exercise in futility.

He recommends changing the existing soil or mounding the soil where the succulents are planted. Creating a 2-foot mound of organic-based compost with a mixture of PermaTill will allow your succulents to flourish even if they find themselves somewhere different from their native environment.
In essence, a good soaking, good soil, and adequate drainage are needed for growing healthy succulents.

How Often Should I Water My Succulents?


Now that you know how to water indoor and outdoor succulents, the next question on your mind will be how often you should water your succulents? Well, to answer your question, first, note that there is no rigid watering schedule for you to follow.

The watering frequency depends on the succulent, the size of your pot, and the weather conditions in your area. The smaller the pot, the less moisture it can accommodate. Hence, the more frequently it needs to be watered. While some persons may need to water their succulents as rarely as once a month, others need to do that weekly.

That said, the right watering frequency that most indoor succulent growers adopt is watering 14 – 21 days at the early stage and adjusting the timeline as time goes on. Ensure that you do not overwater your succulents to avoid rot.
For you not to forget your watering schedule, as well as to avoid under-watering and overwater, you can use a tool called Succulent Tracker App (only iOS version available currently).

How to Water Succulent Plants-Signs Your Succulent is Thirsty-SC
Wilting Leaves needs water: Reddit@u/hbangar99

Signs Your Succulent is Thirsty


Even though succulents are recommended to be dry before watering, ensure that you do not dehydrate them in the process. Once you notice any wrinkles and wilted leaves, it is a sign that you need to water your succulents.
As your succulent’s cells try to transfer their stored moisture to other parts, they also try to accumulate more water to make up for the amount they have lost. But then, if the water is not available to replace what was lost, the cells begin to contract gradually, making the leaves that used to flourish shrivel.

How to Water Succulent Plants-Signs Your Succulent Has Been Overwatered-SC
Image of an Over-watered Plant: Reddit@u/darthlaurian

Signs Your Succulent Has Been Overwatered

The danger of overwatering succulents is that it damages the cell structure, roots, and leaves.
The first and most common sign of overwatering to take note of is discolouration. Once you notice the leaves are becoming soft, translucent, and squishy, know that you have been overwatering the succulents. Unlike under-watered succulents leaves that contract overwatered succulents leaves will be dropped.

While succulents can recover from overwatering, it is not all that easy. A great way to save overwatered succulents is to plant a new one with the cuttings to root and leaves.

How to Water Succulent Plants-Signs of a Healthy Succulent-SC
Healthy Succulent: IG@thecurlyplantlady

Do you want a definite guide on the accurate way to water succulents (like a very easy, step-by-step guide, you just need to follow)? Here comes our new eBook The Correct Way to Water Succulents that will offload your concern. Check it out!

Signs of a Healthy Succulent

First off, plants will always tell you when they need something. But sadly, not everyone knows how to read the signs. While squishy leaves’ discoloration tells you that you are overwatering your succulents, shriveled leaves show that you are under-watering your succulents.

Hens and Chicks plants tend to shut down older, lower leaves as they grow. While this is a natural phenomenon that is part of the growth process, the leaves do not wither. They just become skinny, papery, and brownish. Prone these leaves to keep your succulents looking fresh. All in all, when watering your succulents, you have to consider the soil and the environment. Follow the watering guidelines we mentioned in this article. Your succulents will keep blooming even under the most adverse conditions.