The Soft Monkey Tail Cactus

If you are a sucker for succulent plants or cacti plants in general, then this piece will most definitely tickle your fancy. Succulents are a class of plants characteristically known to have water-filled thick leaves and branches and most famously for their resilience to survive harsh climatic conditions. A majority of people do prefer having such plants as house plants for the fact that they need little care to survive. Especially if you have a busy schedule that has you moving from place to place.

Known by its scientific name Hildewintera Colademononis, the Soft Monkey Tail cactus belongs to the cactus family of plants. Its origin can be traced back to the Bolivian countryside in Santa Cruz. It is of epilithic nature, meaning in its natural habitat it is most commonly found growing on or between steep rocks hanging above a jungle below.

The Soft Monkey Tail Cactus
soft monkey tail garden @_plantsmith_

Characteristics of the Monkey Tail Cactus

This plant probably owes its name to the appearance of its stems, which take up the shape and look of a monkey’s tail. Some might argue that some species of rats do take up a similar appearance, therefore also known as The Rat Tail Cactus. The stems are greenish-yellow and on them are protruding downward-facing hair-like soft white spines that cover the entire stem. To the eye, it may seem like they are safe to touch, but don’t be fooled!

A single plant can have three to five stems, which branch at the bottom. The plant grows upright for a few feet then the stems become pendant and droop. They produce bright, red flowers that are particularly very decorative. They bloom for a few days then turn to fruits with a brief life span. Apart from its natural habitat, the Monkey Tail Cactus does well as a house plant too. Preferably best grown as hanging plants due to its unique drooping stems.

Also, check out “9 Types of Cacti” for a list of buddies for your new Soft Monkey Tail Cactus!

The Soft Monkey Tail Cactus
soft monkey tail cactus @_plantsmith_

Best Growth Conditions for the Monkey Tail Cactus

The Soft Monkey Tail cactus seeds are black and are very easy to germinate if provided with the right conditions. The soil has to be light, well aerated and one that drains quickly, check out this succulent soil and see if it works for you. Meaning sandy and loamy soils are ideal for its growth. The watering of this plant should be done exclusively during the summer and spring seasons and only when the ground feels dry. The warmer the air, the more frequent the watering. Otherwise, over-watering may cause the rotting of the stems and roots. During the cold and winter season, the watering halts as this may result in the frosting of the plant which will kill it.

The Rat’s Tail Cactus is one of the few species of the cactus plant that can survive temperatures lower than the freezing point. This happens to be its dormant stage. It becomes active and grows faster to produce flowers in the spring and summer. It does well in both a shady or a direct sunlight environment.

Be sure to also read about The Burro’s Tail Succulent for an additional cascading succulent that will surely complement your Soft Monkey Tail Cactus.

The Soft Monkey Tail Cactus
soft monkey tail hanging @mcl_cacti_and_succs

Perfect Propagation Techniques for the Monkey Tail Cactus

In the natural habitat, nature has a way of taking care of its own, but if you decide to have this plant as part of your garden, then a few rules need to be followed. Otherwise, the plants won’t do well.

As mentioned above, the seeds of a Soft Monkey Tail Cactus are very easy to germinate, but cuttings can also be used in propagation as well. The cuttings are most productive during the spring and summer seasons where growth is most vigorous. The cuttings must be allowed to grow callouts and left out to dry for a few days before placing them into the soil. Check out these shears for your propagating needs.

During its active and growth periods of summer, you should apply a low-nitrogen fertilizer properly incorporated with the soil around the plant. The best application is by diluting the fertilizer with water and administer it as a liquid. Just one application is enough for a whole year’s supply!

Check out also “How to Propagate Your Succulents Successfully” for more tips on propagating techniques.

The Soft Monkey Tail Cactus
soft monkey tail perfect decoration @cactus.man

How to Control Pests on Your Monkey Tail Cactus

This type of cacti is particularly prone to pest infestation too. Spider mites, scales, and mealybugs are the common culprit pests. Most of these bugs are quite a nuisance but are quite easy to control. In the case of mealybugs, you spray your plant with a pressurized water hose to wash them off. A simple shower is guaranteed to spray the buggers away— check out our article on How to Get Rid of Mealybugs for further advisement. Another simple way to wade the bugs away is to rub alcohol; isopropyl, with a soft cotton swab. And rinsing off the alcohol with water before returning the plant to its spot.

Mites are by far the most annoying pests when it comes to cacti. This is because one is unable to notice their presence until they have damaged the plant to disfigurement. Their control isn’t as easy as the mealybugs and does require a keen eye. So one is inclined to monitor the plant carefully, and if you notice brown patches, then your plant is infected by these buggers. Proper watering and constant fogging by pumping up the humidity will chase these pests away.

Scales, on the other hand, do require hands-on control measures. These pests usually clamp upon the leaves’ surface and hide under an impervious shell. Meaning, spraying them away won’t be as effective as desired. Therefore, one is advised to physically rub alcohol on the affected leaves and remove the scales. One should also pay keen attention to catch the infestation before it is too late. In the case of the Monkey Tail Cacti, the use of a soft toothbrush dipped in alcohol will be of great effect. Because if you use a cotton swab, most of it will remain stuck on the spikes.

Be sure to also read “What is Root Rot & How Do You Fix it?” for tips on how to maintain your succulents out of any rotting.

The Soft Monkey Tail Cactus
soft monkey tail by the window @james_tebbutt

Repotting the Monkey Tail Cactus

Repotting of the Soft Monkey Tail cactus is best done once a year. This is because it grows vigorously and at a speedy rate. The re-potting is ideal after the growing and flowering season is complete. If the plant is fully matured, be sure to use a bigger pot with a new soil mix. The new soil mix must contain fertilizer and should be well aerated as new cuttings need a lot of nutrients to flourish.

The growing and taking care of the Monkey Tail cactus has never been more natural than this. This unique looking plant will most definitely give your front yard a sight to behold.

Enjoyed learning about The Soft Monkey Tail Cactus? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about The Right Way to Propagating Your Succulents Successfully. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

The Soft Monkey Tail Cactus
monkey tail hanging out front @lu.cy8329

After reading about the Soft Monkey Tail Cactus, is it on your wish list? It sure is on ours!

If you think this succulent will make a great addition to your indoor garden check out our articles, How to Successfully Grow indoor Succulents, or How to Care for Succulents in the Winter to make sure you’re fully prepared!

Thanks for reading… Head over to our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge, to join thousands of succulent enthusiasts, like yourself! Or, follow us on Instagram and Pinterest for daily succulent content.

Happy planting!! 🌵

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off?

It’s easy to tell when your succulent is in distress. When it starts doing things like dropping leaves left and right, you know it’s not healthy or happy. But figuring out why your succulent baby is in trouble is really hard!

There are so many factors that affect plant health. Water, sunlight, temperature, the soil you use, and even the pot you’ve put your plant in can affect its health. With so many variables, how are you supposed to figure out why your succulent’s leaves are dropping like flies?

That’s what we’re here to help you with today! Unfortunately, we can’t come to your house and diagnose your plant in person, but we can give you the info you need to figure out what’s wrong on your own. By the end of this post, you’ll be an expert plant doctor!

Before we get to the root of the problems in this article, Amazon is offering our Succulent City community an exclusive offer of a FREE 30-day trial of their famous Amazon Prime Membership. Click here to get your free trial started and enjoy that free 2-day shipping! What’s better than having new succulents on your door step extremely fast?

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Why are my succulents leaves falling off? @mijardin.pe

Low Light Succulents

Succulents can start to drop their leaves if they’re kept in low light conditions for too long. You’ll know that your plant has this issue if it looks tall and stretched out. Sun-starved succulents will also start growing towards a light source. So if your plant seems to be growing sideways to get closer to a window, that’s another sign that lack of light is the problem.

Luckily, this issue is really easy to fix! All you have to do is put your plant someplace sunnier, or put it under a grow light like this one— and for additional grow lights we recommend, check out our article, here! But before you put it outside and expose it to the sun’s blistering rays, make sure that you acclimate it first!

Plants get sun spots / burn too!

Acclimate Your Plant for the Outdoors

To start, you should only give your plant about an hour of sunlight or artificial light each day. Anything more and you’ll risk sunburning it. You can slowly increase the length of sun exposure over a period of a few weeks until your succulent is getting around six hours of bright sunlight each day, or around 12 hours of artificial light.

Your succulent should stop dropping leaves after soaking up some much-needed sun. But unfortunately, you can’t reverse some of the damage that’s been done, like your succulent’s stretched out appearance. You can propagate your original plant and grow brand new plants from it that won’t look stretched out. But giving your original plant more sun won’t make it look as compact as it was on the day you bought it. Bummer, right?

Check out our full article about the importance of sunlight for succulents!

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Low Light Succulents @howorthia

Overwatering Your Succulents

Overwatering can have some serious consequences for your plant! It can cause root rot, make your succulent’s leaves fall off, and can even cause total plant death. Yikes!

Overwatering is one of the easiest ways to kill your succulent, so it’s something you definitely want to avoid. If you notice that your succulent leaves are mushy, soggy, and falling off on the regular, you need to cool it with the watering can!

You should only water your succulent when the soil it’s planted in is completely dry to the touch. You’ll probably end up watering your succulents once every week or two.

If you tweak your watering schedule, your succulent leaves should make a full recovery in no time!

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Overwatering your succulents @momsgarden_la

Will too Much Fertilizer Hurt My Succulents?

If you put too much fertilizer on your succulent, it could actually have the opposite effect and stunt its growth! It can also cause some of its leaves to drop off, discolor the remaining leaves, and burn its root system.

If your houseplant is showing some or all these signs, it’s time to take action! If you see any white crust on the surface of the soil, grab your succulent tools and make sure you remove it all carefully. This is excess salt from the fertilizer—it can damage your plant and burn it if you leave it on there.

How to Remove Excess Fertilizer

Now, if you’re going to try to flush the excess fertilizer out of the soil by watering your succulent. Let the water drain completely, and then repeat the process once or twice to make sure there aren’t any traces of fertilizer left.

Then, make sure you remove any leaves that are damaged or dying. This will prevent your plant from using up its precious resources to try to repair damaged leaves. Your succulent will grow new leaves to replace them, so don’t worry about removing them!

If you follow these steps, we think your succulent leaves will make it! But remember in the future to only fertilize your succulents with water soluble fertilizer, like this one we use from Miracle-Gro, that’s been diluted to half-strength. You should only ever use diluted fertilizer on your plant babies to avoid chemical burns. You should also fertilize them sparingly—no more than once a month during their active growing season. That way they won’t get overloaded with salt or nutrients and start losing their leaves.

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Can too much fertilizer hurt my succulents @olorfulife.photography

Can Succulents Survive Extreme Temperatures?

If your succulent gets too hot, its leaves will actually start dropping off. It’s a normal response to the stress caused by heat and drought. Isn’t that weird? It seems strange, but it won’t actually hurt your plant and it’s not something to worry over too much.

Still, you should try to throw some shade cloth or a plant cover over your succulent or move it to a less sunny area of your garden to try to prevent this from happening. After all, who likes to see their succulent baby stressed?

If your plants gets too cold, though, that can spell disaster. A lot of succulents can’t handle freezing temperatures, and if they’re exposed to them for too long, the cells inside their leaf tissue can freeze and burst, causing irreparable damage.

If your succulent has frozen in the cold, some of its leaves will look brown or black and kind of mushy. If the damage is really bad, the whole plant will look like it’s rotting. In that case, it’s pretty much unsalvageable. For a proper guide on how to care for succulents in the winter, dormant months, check out this article.

But if the damage has only affected a few leaves here or there, your succulent leaves will be ok. Leave the damaged leaves on your plant. When your plant grows, those leaves will fall right off on their own and be replaced by healthy ones.

For cacti-specific tips, click here to see our guide on determining if your cactus is dying.

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off?
Beautiful spiral succulents! @akadamatsuchi

Those are some of the potential causes of leaf-loss and how to treat them! Did this post help you figure out what’s going on with your succulent leaves? Let us know in the comments section below!

Learn about some further ways to ensure your succulents and cacti are as healthy as can be! Check out What to Do When My Succulent Leaves are Splitting, How to Get Rid of Mealybugs, or Repotting Succulents the Right Way.

Thanks for reading! We appreciate all of our dedicated Succulent City reader. Don’t forget, we’re on Pinterest and Instagram! Give us a follow for daily succulent content and inspiration.

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth or even The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent today!

Happy planting! 💚💚

7 Succulent Care Tips

Succulents may not be a real scientific plant family, but they do have a lot of the same characteristics. Succulents are all drought tolerant. They have shallow roots that soak up as much water as possible and swollen leaves that store it for a not-so-rainy day.

Because succulents have these shared traits, you can care for each species in roughly the same way. Succulents require a lot less water than other plants and need lots of sunlight. They all need soil with good drainage, too, and a few other things that we’re going to talk about today.

Here’s our list of seven general succulent care tips that will keep your plant looking nice and healthy!

Keep the soil dry

Succulents, especially cacti, are super sensitive to water. Succulents are resilient little plants that can survive almost anything, but not overwatering. Their roots will rot and they’ll start to attract pests like mealybugs. You’ll have no choice but to toss your beloved succulent in the trash. Unfortunately, we’ve been there.

If you don’t want to make the same mistakes that we did, then make sure you let your succulent’s soil dry out completely in between waterings.Check out this post on how to water your succulents properly, too.

Sloth succulent planter
@botanicalsmh

Use the right soil

Using the right soil can also stop your succulent from rotting. The best soil for succulents will have sand and gritty stones in it like perlite and pumice to promote drainage. Perlite and pumice are porous, which allows water to pass through them easily and helps water drain out of the pot faster.

Commercial succulent and cactus soils have these kinds of ingredients, so they’ll do the trick. But you can also create your own custom soil blend using a few simple ingredients. We like to use three parts of regular potting soil, two parts of a gritty sand like builder’s sand, and one part of either perlite or pumice in our mix.

Still unsure of what soil to use that’s best for your succulent? Be sure to read our in depth guide for succulent soil, it’s helped hundreds of people so far.

Give your plant some air

Something that’s important for succulent health but isn’t often talked about is airflow. Succulents need to have a little room to breathe (I know I do sometimes), so you shouldn’t place them too close together in arrangements if you can help it.

Tight arrangements look great, but may have drainage issues. In order for the soil to dry out properly, enough air has to get to the soil and the roots, and tightly packed arrangements prevent that. If you space them out a little, your plants will have much healthier roots and more room to grow.

Space is good!

Give your succulent plenty of sun

Good ol’ sun rays!

Most succulents come from sunny, warm environments like the desert and the tropics, so they need lots of sunlight to stay healthy. Even succulents like the Snake Plant that can thrive in low light conditions love to get several hours of bright, indirect sunlight every day.

Try to give your succulents between six and eight hours of bright sunlight each day. Your plants will appear more vibrant and healthy if you keep them near one of the sunniest windows in your home, like a south or west facing window.

Giving your succulent babies plenty of sun will also prevent them from getting etiolated. Etiolation happens when a succulent isn’t getting enough sunlight and starts stretching towards the nearest light source, often growing sideways. Etiolated succulents also grow tall very quickly and end up looking quite “stretched out.” It’s definitely something you want to prevent from happening, so put your succulents someplace where they can soak up the sun!

Succulents on top of wooden benches
@lachicabotanica

Don’t let your succulent get too cold

Some succulents, such as Hens and Chicks and Sedums, can survive in freezing temps. But most succulents will actually get brown, mushy leaves if you leave them out in the cold. This is because the water they store in their leaves starts to freeze, which destroys their tissues. Once it happens, this damage is irreversible, so you want to make sure that you bring your outdoor succulent inside when it gets too chilly.

Every succulent has a different range of temperatures it can tolerate, so make sure you do a little research to find out when it’s time to bring your particular succulent inside for the winter.

Use fertilizer

Succulents are known for being slow growers, but fertilizer helps them pick up the pace. It also encourages flowering succulent plants to bloom, so if you want to see your baby flower, pick up some fertilizer.

For most succulents, we recommend using a low balanced, water soluble fertilizer. Balanced fertilizers contain equal amounts of the three main nutrients that your plant needs—nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. You’ll know a fertilizer is balanced if it has three identical numbers on the package, like 8-8-8 or 10-10-10.

“Low balanced” just means that the fertilizer isn’t very concentrated. Succulents need a lot less fertilizer than other plants, and can get burned if you use a fertilizer that’s too strong. That’s why we recommend low balanced fertilizers like 8-8-8 and 10-10-10 blends. Stay away from concentrated fertilizers with high numbers on their packaging, like 20-20-20 blends.

Even though you’re using a low balanced fertilizer, you should still dilute it to half strength to make sure that your plant won’t burn. If you’re using a water soluble fertilizer, you can do this by dissolving half as much fertilizer as the package recommends into the same amount of water. So, if the package tells you to mix one tablespoon of fertilizer into a gallon of water, you should only use half a tablespoon of fertilizer for the whole gallon.

Some people fertilize their succulents weekly, but we like to fertilize ours less often. Once a month is our sweet spot. The best time to fertilize is when your succulent is actively growing, which is usually in the summer, but can vary from species to species.

Figure out the species of your succulent

That brings us to our last point! If you can, figure out which types of succulents you own. Not all succulents grow during the same time of year, so figuring out which species you have will help you administer fertilizer at the right time. Each succulent has slightly different light and water requirements, too. Knowing which succulents you have will help you give better overall care to your plant babies.

You can start off by figuring out if your succulent grows better in the summer or winter here.


Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent or even Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth today!

We hope that this post has helped you learn all about how to take care of succulent plants! If you need more guidance, check out some of our other posts. Happy planting!

What is a Zebra Plant— Haworthia Fasciata

If you’re anything like me, you’re tickled pink admiring the awestruck beauty of Zebras in the jungles of Africa.

But you’re also frustrated when you just can’t figure out whether Zebras are white with black stripes or black with white stripes. Well, thanks to the quirkiest plants on the planet, you can have a green version of the Zebra growing in your garden or living room!

These eye-catching succulents add an ambience of wildlife to living rooms and offices. Their versatile and tenacious qualities ensure that even the most amateur gardener has an easy time growing them.

Quite a conversation starter, the Zebra plant is one succulent you’ll want to get your hands on.

The Zebra Plant— Haworthia Fasciata

The Zebra plant is a low growing succulent reaching to a height of between 4-8 inches. This heavily suckering plant forms proliferating rosettes arising from the base. Haworthia fasciata is generally a slow growing succulent that can last a lifetime. This dainty succulent is clump forming and thus it can fit well with other succulents in the same container.

This South African succulent stands out for its erect, multifarious leaves having streaks of white tubercles on the outer surface which gives it the Zebra effect.

When stressed (mainly due to long hours in hot sun), the tip of the leaves may turn red. Haworthia fasciata has a miniature leafy stem which appears to be almost invisible.

Due to its slow growing nature, the Zebra Haworthia rarely blooms especially when planted indoors. When it does, blooms appear in summer characterized by tiny, tubular pink or white flowers on an inflorescence (a thin tall stem).

Scientific Classification

Botanically referred to as Haworthia Fasciata, this fascinating succulent hails from the family Asphodeloideae, and Haworthia as the Genus. The genus Haworthia is named in honor of Adrian Hardy Haworth, who was an entomologist and a botanist. (How cool is it to have a plant named after you!)

With about 80 species under its belt, Haworthia is one genus that offers a wide variety of succulents for one to explore.

Haworthia fasciata is commonly known as the Zebra cactus though it’s not a cactus but a succulent. Other names include the Zebra Haworthia and the Zebra plant. It’s like the Zebra name is given to anything that has white stripes on it and thus, the name Zebra plant can be quite misleading.

Two other plants (that are not succulents) are also referred to as Zebra plants. These include Aphelandra squarrosa and Calathea zebrine. However, nothing can come close to the glamour exuded by our Zebra Haworthia.

Origin of the Zebra Plant

Haworthia Fasciata or the Zebra plant, is native to the Eastern Cape of South Africa. They always get the good ones!

It was introduced to Europe in 1600 by a group of adventurous collectors and is now a popular household beauty around the world.

Related Species

Haworthia attenuata closely resembles the Zebra cactus. In fact, both succulents share the name Zebra plant. The only distinguishing feature between the two is the tubercles on the leaves.

Whereas Haworthia attenuata has both of its leaf surfaces covered by white tubercles, Haworthia fasciata’s leaves have a smooth inner surface devoid of any white marks.

Something else to note is that Haworthia fasciata is considered a rare species.

Hordes of succulent beginners tend to think that the Zebra plant is a stripped version of the Aloe. It’s not. Sure, they are from the same sub-family and are both native to South Africa, but there are marked differences that distinguish the two.

How to Take Care of Haworthia Fasciata

The Zebra plant tops the list in the succulents’ starter pack for beginners. It’s an easy care plant that will grow brilliantly even when most neglected. However, giving it ideal growing conditions when its young will ensure it turns out to be a healthy plant.

Continue reading for an in depth guide on how to grow and take care of your Zebra Haworthia.

What is the ideal temperature for the Zebra plant?

This xerophyte has been long adapted to desert conditions and will therefore thrive even in high heat levels. As an indoor plant, it will do just fine with room temperatures between spring and autumn. During winter, it prefers cool temperatures. However, Haworthia fasciata can’t tolerate freezing or anything below 4°C.

As the case with many succulents, the Zebra plant doesn’t require any humidity.

Light requirements for haworthia fasciata

Although The Zebra plant is a total sun zealot, it can also do well in partial shades. If growing outdoors, find a spot where your Haworthia will receive at least four hours of bright, indirect sunlight. Indoor Zebra plants will receive adequate lighting when placed near a huge, uncovered south-facing window.

Avoid exposing your Haworthia fasciata to direct sunshine for long hours especially during summer. This leads to sunburn, giving the leaves an undesirable purple, red or brown color. Similarly, placing your Zebra plant in a shade for extended periods will result in a weak and lanky plant. Avoid both extremes for robust growth.

Soil & Fertilizing

The ideal soil for Haworthia fasciata is grainy and well-draining to ensure that the plant does not sit on damp soil for long. The best bet is a commercial cacti mix which you can easily buy online.

Alternatively, you can use common gardening soil by mixing it with equal portions of pumice and perlite. This gives it good drainage ensuring that the roots don’t rot due to excess moisture.

Give your Zebra plant a weak solution of fertilizer occasionally. Twice or thrice a year is probably too much. Do NOT feed it during winter.

Watering your Zebra Plant

The Zebra cactus can go for long periods without water. On that account, they can cope with under watering but easily succumb to root rot due to overwatering. In warm climates, watering it once a week is recommended. Water the Zebra plant once a fortnight in cooler areas.

Use the “soak and dry” method to water your plants. This is giving your succulents a drench and waiting for the soil to dry out before watering again.

Minimize watering during winter as these plants lapse into inactivity.

Pests to look out for

Fortunately, Haworthia fasciata does not suffer from many pest invasions. Spider mites and mealy bugs are the most common insects that occasionally plague it. Nothing too unordinary!

Haworthia Fasciata Care Tips

  1. Leaves turning red: This is due to excess sunlight. Move your zebra plant in a shaded area and the undesirable red tinge will begin to fade back to normal. (Keep in mind if your succulent is sun burnt, it may not be reversed).
  2. Leaf tips are brown and dead: This is quite normal depending on the degree of color on the tips. Browning is typically only confined to the tips of the leaves, don’t worry.
  3. Plant collapse: This is typically caused by overwatering and exposure to very cold temperatures. Warm that baby up and let it drink all of its nutrients first.

5 Reasons to Grow a Zebra Plant

  1. It’s one of the most visually appealing succulents.
  2. Requires minimal maintenance, super easy to take care of.
  3. The Zebra Plant is not poisonous, being safe for both humans and pets.
  4. They take up very little space. So much so that little baby shoes and teacups are used as planters. (Check out these cute modern planters we found).
  5. It has a long life span, perfect for gifting to generations.

How to Propagate Haworthia Fasciata

Just like Aloe, propagating Haworthia fasciata is a painless and straight forward process with a high rate of success. Either offsets or leaves can be used as propagates. When propagating using leaves, pluck a healthy leaf from the mother plant.

Allow the wound to heal for a few days. Stick the calloused leaves in a well-draining potting mix. Water only once and wait for signs of growth to water again.

Propagating using offsets is much easier and thought to have a higher success rate. Any healthy Zebra plant will often produce offsets. Use a sharp knife to neatly remove them, cutting as close to the mother plant as possible. This is to ensure that the offset gets some roots.

In some cases, a knife may be completely unnecessary as the offset may be loosely attached to the plant and come off easily with a gentle tug.

Wait a few days for the wound to heal. This is to reduce the risks of rot in the new wound. Set up the dried offset in a cacti potting mix, water slightly and place in a warm, brightly lit area.

The best time to propagate Haworthia fasciata is during summer or at the end of spring. This is because it’s warm and there’s a lot of sunlight – excellent conditions for optimum growth.

Repotting Tips for Haworthia Fasciata

Zebra plants are generally tiny and slow growing. Therefore, it might take a while for the plant to outgrow its pot. Repotting is done every so often and only when the pot is filled with offsets.

In some cases, the roots may overgrow the pot and hence a repot may be necessary. Use similar potting mix when repotting.

The recommended time to repot is during summer or late spring. Change the soil every two years to get rid of molds, pests and to revamp the nutrition of the soil. Read more about repotting succulents here.

Where can I buy the Zebra Plant Succulent?

Haworthia fasciata is a rare and hard to find succulent. However, during summer or spring, it can easily be sourced from nurseries, conservatories and local garden centers. If not, online stores such as Mountain crest gardens, succulent box and Etsy may be your best bet.


Have you had enough of the Zebra Plant yet? If not be sure to spread the word to your friends about how amazing and easy it is to care for a rare succulent like this. Leave a comment below about how this article has helped you with your zebra plant.

Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complementary guide. 

Happy Planting! ?

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