The Best Succulents Box Review Guide For You

Succulents Box Subscription Review

We love getting plants delivered! Our local nursery is a little slim on the succulent pickings, so plant subscription boxes, like Succulent Box, allow us to try out so many species we never would’ve gotten a chance to own. 

We’re always super excited to receive our plants in the mail, and a little nervous. Succulents are pretty hard to ship. Their leaves are delicate and fragile, so they’re easily damaged in transit. The leaves can even fall off if the succulents aren’t properly packaged and get jostled around too much!

When we got our Succulent Box in the mail, we were relieved to discover that all of our plants were ok! Thanks to the ample padding in the box, none of our succulents were damaged.

Succulents Box Review
Just look at all those packing peanuts! Our succulents could not have been safer.

Time to Unwrap!

We carefully unwrapped all of our new succulents and were really impressed with how they looked.

Succulents Box Review
Plant family photo!

Would you be able to tell that these succulents were wrapped in bubble wrap just a few minutes ago? We wouldn’t—they don’t look misshapen at all!

We loved that every succulent came with a little identification card. It’s easy to figure out which genus your succulent belongs to, but it can be pretty hard to figure out the species and variety.

We definitely would’ve known that the succulent on the left in the photo above was an Echeveria, but we might not have figured out it was a Blue Elf. So we really appreciate the fact that these ID cards were included in the subscription box!

Succulents Box Review
Care instructions and a coupon code—sweet!

We also liked that the subscription box came with care instructions. It had some really helpful tips, like acclimate your succulent plants gradually to sunlight to keep them from burning and water them less during the winter. It had almost everything someone new to succulents would need to know to take great care of their plant babies!

Now let’s take a closer look at each plant that came in the box!

What’s Inside?

Our subscription box came with four succulent plants: one Echeveria, two Sedums, and one Sempervivum.

A Succulent Box like this one with four plants only costs $20, so each succulent costs $5. Not bad, right?

We’d say this cute little Echeveria ‘Blue Elf’ is worth the price!

Succulents Box Review
Echeveria ‘Blue Elf’

And so is this Sedum ‘Firestorm’ below. The edges of its leaves turn a beautiful bright red color in the sun. You can already see that they’re starting to turn red, but we can’t wait until the colors get even more vibrant!

Succulents Box Review
Sedum ‘Firestorm’

Here’s one of the Sempervivums⁠—a beautiful Pachyphyllum plant. Look at those gorgeous fleshy green leaves!

Succulents Box Review
Sempervivum Pachyphyllum

Last but not least, here’s a closer look at the Sempervivum Calcareum.

Succulents Box Review
Sempervivum Calcareum

This succulent has a big, beautiful green rosette with a hint of maroon on the tips of its leaves! Isn’t it gorgeous?

Looks like it’s already sprouting a chick, too, so this succulent is basically two for the price of one!

Overall Consensus

Overall, we’re super happy with our Succulent Box! The plants look healthy and didn’t arrive with any kind of damage. We loved all the extra touches that the box came with, like the succulent identification cards and the care instructions. The bright blue packaging on the outside of the box was super cute too!

As you can see from the photos above, there’s a nice variety of succulents in this box. They’re pretty good size as well—the ones you’d get from a nursery wouldn’t be much bigger.

And who knows if a nursery near you would even have all of these unique succulents! We’ve personally never seen an Echeveria ‘Blue Elf’ at any of the garden centers near us.

Plus, going to the garden center is not nearly as fun as getting a subscription box in the mail. Having a succulent surprise delivered to our door and not knowing what was in it was so exciting!

 

Succulents Box Review

Full Succulents Box

Would you guys get a plant subscription box like Succulent Box? We’d definitely get one again, especially since they start at $5! We also love that their 300 varieties of succulents and air plants are organically grown in California, making them a quick- ship when ordering within the USA.

Ready to get your subscription box started? Head to this link to order yours!


Let us know your thoughts and experiences in the comments section below or share in our Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge. We’re sure our fellow succulent lovers would love to hear from you!

Have your own succulent subscription box, or planters, or any succulent- related item you’d like for us to review? Contact us to inquire, we’d love more succulents for the office!

Before your new succulent babies deliver, make sure you check out our care guides so you’re fully prepared! Check out When You Should Water Your Succulents, How to Propagate Your Succulents Successfully, and Your Ultimate Guide on How to Care for Air Plants!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Have fun and happy planting! 🌱

Summer & Winter Succulents: What’s the Difference?

Summer & Winter Succulents: What's the Difference?

Spring is right around the corner! The birds are chirping, the flowers are blooming, the bees are busy pollinating and the days are getting longer. A lot of your succulents should be getting ready to wake up, while some are getting ready to slow their growth down as it gets hotter. But why do some of your succulents look great in summer, while others look great in autumn?

During the hottest parts of the year, Echeveria and Lithops get ready to put on a show, while in February your Kalanchoe are growing like crazy. Why is that exactly? Well, it’s because succulents, like all plants, have different growing seasons. (Even spring has it’s own uniqueness too)!

We refer to these as “summer growers” and “winter growers”, and knowing the difference can not only help you to better care for your plants, but it’s advantageous when potting arrangements to get a flower show year-round from your succulents!

So what exactly are the summer growers and winter growers, and how should you care for them? Let’s find out!

Succulent plant rainbow
Succulent Plants@tudoparasuculentas

Summer Dormant Succulent Species (Winter Growers)

These are a few popular succulents that love it when the temperatures drop! While no succulent appreciates true winter and lots of snow, these generally start to wake up around September and grow until snowfall, then rest a bit until February and continuing to grow vigorously until May.

  • Aeonium
  • Aloe
  • Anacampseros
  • Cotyledon
  • Crassula
  • Dudleya
  • Gasteria
  • Graptopetalum
  • Haworthia
  • Kalanchoe
  • Pachyveria
  • Sansevieria
  • Sedum
  • Senecio

Popular Winter Growers

Aeonium— “Kiwi”

Aeonium ‘Kiwi’ is an essential winter grower! With striking, vibrant pink and yellow rosette’s, they are easy to grow and multiply quickly during their growing season.

Graptoveria— “Opalina”

‘Opalina’ is a common hybrid between Echeveria ‘colorata’ and Graptopetalum amethystinum. With chunky, opalescent, powdery leaves, they are an easy growing succulent that will reward you with lots of babies when cared for properly.

Sedum Morganianum— “Donkey Tail”

Arguably one of the most popular succulents in the world, these trailing Sedums are essential for everyone’s garden. Almost resembling long, chunky hair, these Sedums will grow fast and long and are very easy to propagate.

BE SURE TO ALSO READ:

Donkey Tail Succulent Plant @plant.heart.city

Winter Dormant Succulent Species (Summer Growers)

These are just a few of the more popular succulent species that thrive in warmer temperatures, usually going dormant from late October to mid-February. It’s important to note that when succulents go “dormant”, that it’s more of a slow growing period than a true dormancy. So while you may see growth year round, the specific growing season of certain species determines how much growth you see as well as blooming periods.

  • Agave
  • Echeveria
  • Euphorbia
  • Lithops
  • Monadenium
  • Pachypodium
  • Stapelianthus

Popular Summer Growers

Echeveria Lola

Lola’s are a gorgeous, easy-to-grow succulent that will give you gorgeous colors year round! With a compact rosette, bright pink tips, and pastel pink on the underside of their leaves, they’re a great addition to anyone’s garden!

Learn everything you need to know about Echeveria Lola here

Agave Attenuata— “Variegata”

Agave attenuata ‘Variegata’ is a striking addition to anyone’s landscape. This is one of those succulents that you can truly let nature take care of, especially in warmer climates. They shoot out large, towering blooms that more closely resemble an alien planets landscape than a succulent bloom!

Agave Attenuata “Variegata” @twigtrunkandleaf

Euphorbia Trigona

An extremely common Euphorbia, they are very tolerant of extreme sun and temperatures. Take care when repotting/propagating, as the white sap they released when damaged can lead to skin irritation and potentially blindness! It is recommended to repot/propagate with gloves and goggles.

How to Care for Summer & Winter Succulents

So what does this mean in terms of caring for your succulents? Well, it’s fairly simple. Whether you have a winter grower or a summer grower will determine how much you water and when. Check out this quick guide on how to water succulents.

For summer growers like Echeveria, they prefer a lot more water during the hotter months and very scarce amounts during winter. On the contrary, Sedums, an extremely popular succulent and winter grower, will need a lot more water during chillier months, and less when it’s hot out.

Not too hard to care for right? Now here’s where things get interesting. When it comes to succulent arrangements, mixing and matching winter growers and summer growers can result in a year-long psychedelic show of colors and blooms, especially when you throw some cacti in the mix! But since summer and winter growers require different watering schedules, how do you keep them together and alive?

Well, it’s important to look at exactly HOW you water your succulents. Do you hose them down, soaking them fully? What about watering around the base of each succulent with a pipette or small watering can? Do you just let nature take care of them?

When it comes to succulent arrangements, whether they have drainage or not, it’s always best to water around the base of each succulent, as compared to soaking the entire arrangement. That way, you’re able to meet the needs of each individual plant more precisely.

Read how you can repot your succulents so that no matter if it’s summer or winter, your succulent can grow healthily and vibrant.

When arranging summer and winter growers in a singular arrangement, it’s often times a lot easier to separate them, giving you the ability to water one side more during summer, and one side more during winter. This will also make it easier to fertilize, as you can simply inoculate one side with nutrients, letting the other side stay relatively unfertilized until it’s time for their growing season.

Growing Succulents in Winterless Climates

So you’ve read through everything so far, but you’re confused because you don’t get winters colder than 45℉. Don’t worry, the same rules still mostly apply! Except you will have to pay closer attention to watering your succulents.

If you live in a place where sometimes January or February can reach 60℉ or more, a lot of your succulents will grow and bloom all year, just slowing down a bit during hotter or colder months.

Often times, master succulent or cactus growers will separate summer and winter growers into greenhouses with differing environments, only keeping them outside during spring and fall! However, if you don’t have access to heaters and coolers and greenhouses, a simple fix can be to bring some summer growers inside during the winter, to be placed in a bright window or under grow lights, so they can still experience a simulated winter!

Conversely, the same can be done for winter growers during the warmer months. Just pay close attention to their lighting needs, as succulents always prefer bright light! Here’s a great guide of the best grow lights if you’re growing succulents on indoors


With all this new information under your belt, it’s time to start planting! Look at what you have, what care you can give, and start planning your succulent garden today! It’s always helpful to figure out what plant hardiness zone you live in, and go from there.

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Can Succulents Survive in My Work Environment?

Can Succulents Survive in My Work Environment

Does the thought of walking into the office on a Monday morning fill you with utter dread? It may be because your career path has you doing the same, repetitive thing for 5 days a week, or perhaps your work environment lacks inspiration. If this scenario sounds a bit too close to yours, keep reading, we may have something that will help!

Many of us find ourselves stuck for hours under fluorescent light, surrounded by bland colored walls and the occasional exasperating colleague. Yes, this is the modern version of ‘adulting’ where we are trapped in the same drab scenery, sometimes for more than 13 hours a day, all in the name of work.

Crazy thought, right?

can succuelnts survive at work
teeny succulent @homeagainstudios

Your Office Environment Directly Correlates with Inspiration & Creativity

Your office environment should be conducive to creativity, inspire passion, and over all, make you feel comfortable enough to be a productive member of the society!

If you have had the opportunity to have a look at successful workplaces like Google, their offices transfer you from the cement and concrete jungle on the outside to an imaginary tropical rainforest on the inside. Every alcove has a plant and working areas have been created to revolve around the plant life. They have literally brought life into the building.

Google’s interior designers were on to something great when they realized how plants affect employee productivity, moral and mental stability. Unfortunately, we all can’t work at Google. What is stopping you from taking the idea and re-creating it to fit your work environment?

It won’t matter how dreary your work atmosphere is if you brought in a little something to brighten up the ambiance! Just like home feels lively with a new pet, a healthy, happy plant at your desk will definitely improve the mood of everyone around you. We are not saying go get a creeper to grow over your boss’s door, but how about a pretty little succulent?

can succulents survive at work
three little succulents @ob_curewriter

Benefits to Having Plants in the Office

1. Plants are Air Purifying

According to NASA research, plants have the ability to clean both air and water in enclosed environments. The Snake Plant and Aloe Vera are capable of removing 87% of volatile organic compounds (VOC) like benzene and formaldehyde that are found in carpets, books, and ink. Harmful toxins from chemical cleaning agents, mold, and dust mites are also greatly reduced by having a couple of these plants around you.

2. Plants Help Reduce Common Office Sickness

Plants are responsible for about 10% of moisture in the atmosphere. By improving the humidity in the room, plants can help prevent sore throats, dry coughs, colds and dry itchy skin. Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) is a real thing that affects a high percentage of the population, and sadly, most of them don’t even know they are suffering from it. Plants have been proven to diminish this syndrome. Therefore more plants in the office can mean less work for the HR department!

can succulents survive at work
potted succulents @theprosweddings

3. Have Your Own Personal Source of Fresh Oxygen!

Succulent plants are a natural source of fresh oxygen and improve air circulation. Basic Science states that green plants take in carbon dioxide and give out oxygen, meaning succulents, like cacti on your desk, will give you your very own supply of fresh oxygen! Knowing that, don’t you feel special already?

4. Productivity at Work Improves

Researchers from Kansas State University found that people who directly interact with succulents have improved concentration, memory, and productivity; attributes that are necessary for any work environment.

can succulents survive at work
beautifully unique succulent @concrete_gardens

5. Plants Can Help Boost Office – Morale

Succulents can help make your office space more liveable. There is a reason office interior designers use succulents as decorative pieces. They blend perfectly with the space they are given, brighten up your desk space or reception desk, and make generally the office a warmer and friendlier place to be.

can succulents survive at work
blooming beauty @succulent_crazy_sisters

Depending on your office space and set up, (and what the boss will allow) you could improve your work environment with a small succulent in a nice coffee cup on your desk. If there are tables in the foyer, a succulent center piece is a welcoming sight for tired eyes. A succulent in the boardroom might just seal that business deal!

We have thought of a few tiny succulents you can start with that won’t clutter your desk or grow too large to become an inconvenience.

can succulents survive at work
sproutin’ @solidplants

Sansevieria Trifasciata ‘Hahnii’ – Bird’s Nest

The Sansevieria trifasciata ‘Hahnii is an adorable desk plant that will only get to 30 cm tall. It goes by various names like Bird’s Nest, Good Luck Plant, Dwarf Plant, Snake Plant, Golden Bird’s Nest and Golden Hahnii.

The leaves of this plant are green-gold in color with a wide central stripe. The leaves are oval-shaped and grow as a tight rosette. As the plant grows, the leaves start to get the shape of a vase and have off-white horizontal bands going across them.

There is the possibility of the plant blooming in summer or autumn. When it does, it produces greenish-white flowers with a sweet fragrance.

The Bird’s Nest is one of the few succulents that actually thrive in fluorescent light, making it a perfect choice for any workplace!

can succulents survive at work
bird’s nest succulent @plantsandcats_

Sansevieria Trifasciata – Snake Plant

If you have a carpeted office, then the Sansevieria Trifasciata is the perfect succulent for you. This plant is native to West Africa and goes by the names Snake Plant, Mother-in-Law’s Tongue, and Viper’s Bowstring Hemp. The names might scare you off, but this plant has all the benefits of a mother’s hug.

NASA Clean Air Study proved that this evergreen perennial has the ability to remove 4 of the 5 main toxins concerned with Sick Building Syndrome. Physical irritability, difficulty concentrating, drowsiness, nausea and fatigue are some of the effects felt by people suffering from SBS. Having the Snake Plant all around the office can help relieve these symptoms.

Not only is this plant helpful, but it is also quite interesting to gaze at. The stiff leaves of the Sansevieria Trifasciata grow out vertically like snakes from a basal rosette, and as the plant gets older, the leaves turn dark green and have a light gray-green cross-banding.

The Snake Plant copes well with low light conditions and can easily cheer up any corner of your office while complementing any monotone wall paint.

can succulents survive at work
snake plant @seemyplants

Crassula Ovata – Jade Plant

What better way is there to promote business growth and boost office morale than with a traditional Asian lucky charm? The Crassula Ovata or Jade Plant has been a symbol of wealth and prosperity for centuries and is believed to channel positive financial energies.

Originally from South Africa and Mozambique, the Jade Plant only requires a few hours a day of medium light. Even though they might grow a little slower than usual, they can survive for years under fluorescent light.

The Jade Plant mimics the look of a bonsai tree and can be trimmed to look like one. The leaves of the Jade Plant are glossy, dark grey-green in color, and symbolize growth and renewal. The leaves look the same as jade coins, which in Asia represent wealth and prosperity. In early spring, this succulent will produce star-shaped flowers that may either be white or pink.

Crassula Ovata is known by many names, including Jade Tree, Money Tree/Plant, Dollar Plant, Friendship Tree, Lucky Plant, Pink Joy, Japanese, Chinese or Dwarf Rubber.

Astrophytum Asterias – Sand Dollar Cactus

There is no better way to add some excitement to your office space than with a cactus, and the Astrophytum Asterias definitely stands out from the crowd. It’s tiny, cute, and looks like a furry pumpkin!

This small, round, spineless cactus only grows up to 2.4 inches (6 cm) tall and 6 inches (15 cm) wide. It has a disc-shaped body that is dark green in color and surrounded by 5 to 8 ribs. There are woolly areoles in the middle of each rib and it produces large, bright yellow flowers with large petals that have bright orange-red midpoints.

After the cactus blooms, it gives off green, pink, or grayish-red fruit that is covered with thick, furry hair.

This not- so- famous little guy has been previously referred to as Sand Dollar Cactus, Sea Urchin Cactus, Star Cactus, or Star Peyote.

can succulents survive at work
sand dollar cactus @mesathorny

Work Place Plants

There are plenty more succulents with a variety of shapes and colors that, with a little love, can flourish in the workplace.

Check out our article “5 Office Succulents You Wish You Had at Work

Being low maintenance plants, succulents can perform miraculously around your work schedule. If you stay faithful to the succulent watering rule of  Do Not Overwater, your office succulent should survive, even after you exhaust your leave days.

Give your succulent a drink every two to three weeks after checking to see that the soil is dry. Should you find the opportunity for your succulent to sit by a window for a few hours during the day, by all means, take it. Your succulent will thank you by showing off its vibrant colors!

ALSO READ:

can succulents survive at work
flowers & love @plantscapesbydesign

Do your succulents survive in your work environment? We want to see!! Join our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge, and share your photos for our fellow succulent- lovers for some inspiration!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (Click here to get all the details!), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Happy planting!?

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents

All you need to know about stonecrop succulents

Stonecrop succulents, also known as Sedums, are a hardy little group of plants that are perfect for outdoor gardens! They can survive in below freezing temperatures, poor soil conditions, and hot, sunny weather. No matter what growing zone you live in or where you plant them in your garden, they’ll be able to thrive!

Sedums come in colors like green, red, purple, and yellow. They usually produce yellow, pink, or white blooms that attract birds and butterflies. They’re just as pretty as they are hardy, so they’re fantastic plants to have in your garden!

Caring for sedums is pretty easy, but you’ll still need a few essential tips—so keep reading!

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@succy_place

Origins

Most varieties of sedum are native to Europe and Asia, so they can handle a temperate climate. Sedum is grown in many gardens in North American today because of their cold hardiness and pretty appearance. Sedum has beautiful, showy flowers and glossy leaves in colors like green, blue, maroon, purple, orange, and gold.

Most varieties of sedum are creeping, which means that they spread out as they grow and fill up bare spaces in gardens. Some varieties of sedum, though, are tall. Tall varieties grow up instead of out and get to be about 2 or 3 feet high. They’re prized for their beautiful flowers!

Caring for Sedums

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@succy_place

By now we’ve probably convinced you that you need some beautiful stonecrop succulents in your garden, so now you need to learn how to care for them! Well, we’ve got your back! You’ll have no problem caring for sedums even if you have a black thumb as long as you follow these tips.

Soil Requirements

The easiest way to kill a sedum is to let it sit in water! Planting sedums in porous soil that drains quickly helps prevent water from pooling and damaging their roots.

If you’re planting your stonecrops in pots, make sure that you use ones with drainage holes and fill them with a porous succulent soil.

If you’re planting stonecrop succulents out in your garden, you should test the soil to make sure it drains quickly enough before you put the succulents in the ground. To do this, dig a hole that’s a foot deep and fill it with water. If the water drains in thirty minutes or less, your soil is ready for your stonecrops! If not, you’ll need to mix three inches of something gritty, like perlite or sand, into the soil to make it more porous.

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Water Requirements

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@succy_place

Overwatering is another major cause of death for stonecrop succulents! Stonecrop succulents that are kept outside don’t need a whole lot of water. During the winter when they’re dormant, they may not need any water at all if your area gets rainfall. During the spring, summer, and fall, you’ll only need to water them once a week if they’re a tall variety. Creeping sedums can get by on even less water.

If you’re growing sedum indoors, your plants will need more water than ones kept outside. We recommend that you water your sedums about once a week during the spring through fall. During the winter, cut back on watering your plants. Once every three to four weeks should be sufficient—you only want to water them enough to keep their leaves from drying out and puckering.

Before you water your sedums, make sure the soil is completely dry. You can test this by sticking your finger about an inch deep into the soil. If it’s wet, put down the watering can! If it feels dry, your succulent is thirsty and needs a drink, so proceed with watering!

You should follow the soak and dry method when watering your sedums. To do this, grab your watering can and pour water onto the soil until it starts running out of the drainage holes of the pot. If your sedums are outdoors, pour enough water on the soil until it feels wet about an inch down. Don’t water your plants again until the soil feels completely dry to avoid overwatering them!

Light and Temperature Requirements

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@succulent_crazy_sisters

Outdoors, sedums can thrive no matter where you put them in the garden. You can plant them in partial shade or full sun and they’ll do well. Here’s some great outdoor pots if you don’t plan to have them in the regular ground or soil. Our team member has one of these bad boys actually!

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Indoors, sedums need bright sunlight, so keep them near the sunniest window in your home or under a grow light.

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As for temperature, sedums are pretty hardy. Most varieties can survive in below freezing temperatures of negative twenty or thirty degrees, so they’re the perfect outdoor succulents for cold growing zones. No need for ridiculous plant covers!

Fertilizer Requirements

Stonecrops don’t absolutely need fertilizer. Since they can survive in poor soil conditions, they don’t need extra nutrients from fertilizer to keep growing. If you want to save money or time, it’s a step you can skip.

But if you want your stonecrops to be the healthiest they can be (we know you do!), then they’ll benefit from a few applications of diluted fertilizer during the spring, summer or fall.

Diluting water-soluble fertilizer is easy—just use half as much fertilizer as the directions call for. So if the back of the box says to dissolve 1 tablespoon of fertilizer in a gallon of water, you should only use ½ tablespoon.

If you’d rather not use chemical fertilizer, you can apply a layer of organic compost to the soil once during the fall.

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Miracle-Gro 4001234 Water Soluble All Purpose Plant Food, 6.25 lb
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Miracle-Gro 4001234 Water Soluble All Purpose Plant Food, 6.25 lb
Miracle-Gro 4001234 Water Soluble All Purpose Plant Food, 6.25 lb
Joyful Dirt Premium Concentrated All Purpose Organic Plant Food...
Joyful Dirt Premium Concentrated All Purpose Organic Plant Food...

Last update on 2021-01-19 / Amazon

Propagating Sedum

Succulent propagation can seem kind of intimidating, but propagating a sedum is super easy! All you have to do to be able to grow brand new plants is take a couple of stem cuttings. We promise your sedum won’t even notice those stems are missing!

To take some cuttings, grab a sharp garden knife and cut the stem of your sedum below the leaves. You want the whole cutting to be at least three inches long, so keep that in mind when you’re cutting the stem.

Any leaves on the bottom inch of the cutting should be stripped, and then the cutting should be planted in some moist succulent soil. You should keep the soil just barely moist at all times over the next week or two. You can mist the soil with a spray bottle to keep it damp. Once the cuttings take root you can water them normally, just like you would any other sedum.

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Make sure you keep your cuttings in a place with bright but indirect sunlight. Sedums can’t handle harsh sunlight or freezing temps until they’ve matured and grown a bit!

ALSO READ:

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@worldofsucculents

Now that you know all about stonecrop succulents, are you going to plant any in your garden? Let us know in the comments section below!

If you already have these and want to ask specific questions in how to care for them even more, be sure to ask our exclusive members for TIPS and TRICKS that they find to be super useful. (It helps our team members a lot).

Enjoyed learning about All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting! ?

The 7 Best Succulents for Wedding Arrangements

7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements

Flowers, move over! Succulent wedding bouquets are all the rage right now, and it’s easy to see why. Succulents come in a wide array of colors and textures and make beautiful, unique bouquets. They’re the perfect choice for brides who want something a little different than the standard rose, tulip, and peony arrangement.

Summer is the season for weddings, so we thought we’d share the best succulents for wedding arrangements with you today. If you’re getting married soon and you need some bouquet inspiration, or you just want to admire some beautiful succulent arrangements, then keep on reading!

Before we talk about succulents for wedding arrangements, we want to share with you a FREE 30-day trial of Amazon’s Prime Membership, on us! This gives you access to all of the perks of being a prime member for 30 days with no obligations. You will have plenty of time to order all the things you might need for your succulent or wedding needs. Consider this a gift from your friends at Succulent City. Enjoy!

7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
The 7 Best Succulents for Wedding Arrangements @shindigchic

Echeveria

Echeveria has beautiful rosettes that make them look similar to flowers. They’re one of our favorite succulents for bouquets because they’re super elegant and classy!

Echeveria comes in a wide variety of colors, including blue, pink, purple, black, and green, so they’ll match any color scheme. Some Echeveria even have different shapes and textures, so you can make a bouquet with just this one succulent and still end up with a visually interesting result.

See the wavy succulents in the photo below? Those are ruffled Echeveria! Aren’t they beautiful? We think they kind of look like peonies and add lots of texture to that bouquet.

Echeveria look great on their own and mix well with flowers too, which is why we think they’re the perfect wedding succulent!

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Our Pick
Wedideas Succulent Wedding Bouquet
$50.00+

This is a beautiful -almost fresh- Top Quality Silk Lavender Lilac Sprays, Blue undertone Succulents and Blush Peonies Wedding Bouquet, made with the most realistic silk flowers available.

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The 7 Best Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
cool- colored Echeveria bouquet @davidorrweddings

Aeonium

We think Aeoniums are the perfect addition to any fall bouquet. Do you see that gorgeous dark maroon/purple succulents in the photo below? Those are Aeoniums! It has a dark, rich color that adds a little extra drama to any fall bouquet.

If that beautiful Bordeaux color won’t mesh with your color scheme, don’t worry! Aeoniums come in other colors that might suit your fancy. One of our favorite Aeoniums is pale yellow with green stripes and pink tips— check them out at the bottom of the bouquet in the photo below! It’s called Sunburst and looks gorgeous with other pastel succulents or flowers!

We also have a guide about the beautiful Aeonium succulent!

Our Pick
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7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
are Aeoniums a fit for you? @succycrazy

Air Plants

OK, so air plants aren’t technically succulents. But they look so good mixed in with succulents and flowers that we had to tell you about them.

Air plants are epiphytes that grow on other plants and trees. They’re native to tropical rainforests and don’t need to be planted in soil to survive— for care questions you can refer to our ultimate guide on how to care for air plants.

Air plants are really hardy and will hold up nicely in any wedding bouquet. They’d also do great as centerpieces for receptions! We’ve all heard horror stories of a bride’s flowers wilting right before her wedding—with air plants, that won’t happen! You can find a great selection of them to choose from. When going with succulents and air plants you can rest easy knowing your wedding decor will look exactly as you planned.

In addition to being hardy, they’re very beautiful! See the palm-looking plants in the bouquets, below? Those are air plants! We think they add an unexpected touch of lush greenery and texture to that otherwise conventional bouquet of flowers. It’s definitely the star of the arrangement!

Air plants play nicely with flowers, but they can also be used by themselves to make a truly special, unique wedding bouquet. That’s why they’re one of our absolute favorite plants for weddings!

Are you loving the idea of having a succulent bouquet? 

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01/21/2021 06:37 am GMT

 

7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
simple and elegant Air Plant arrangements @airplantdesignstudio

Burro’s Tail

Burro’s Tail is such a gorgeous succulent! It’s a trailing plant, so its long stems cascade down whatever pot or planter you put it in. Each stem has lots of pale green, teardrop-shaped leaves. It’s one of the most visually interesting and beautiful succulents out there, so it’ll look amazing hanging down from your bouquet! Check them out in the photo below!

If you’re lucky, your Burro’s Tail might even be in bloom on your wedding day. This succulent doesn’t bloom often, but when it does it sprouts gorgeous pinkish-red blooms that will add some extra prettiness to your arrangement! We think they’d also add a special pop as part of your centerpieces. 

We have a full article about the glorious Burro’s Tail.

Our Pick
Donkey’s Tail Succulent
$15.99

You will receive two healthy cuttings with 4”-6” long.

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7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
add a string of Burro’s Tails to your wedding bouquet @omniasucculents

String of Pearls

String of Pearls is another trailing succulent that looks a lot like Burro’s Tail. It has leaves that are shaped like pearls instead of teardrops, so it looks like a long, beautiful strand of pearls. This plant is elegant and delicate, just like the real pearl necklace you might wear on your wedding day!

Take a look at the arrangement below—doesn’t the String of Pearls look absolutely stunning in that bouquet? The nice thing about them is after the wedding you can have a new hanging plant for your home. You can refer here to our article about the Top 5 Hanging Planters. You can beautifully display your String of Pearls in your home for years to come!

Our Pick
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cascading String of Pearls @inspiration_floristics

Pachyveria

Pachyveria is another type of succulent that has beautiful rosettes. This plant has plumper leaves than an Echeveria, though, so it gives a slightly different look to bouquets. Small Pachyverias would even look great on your groomsmen.

Pachyveria comes in many colors from pink to blue to green, so you’re sure to find one that matches your color scheme. Our favorite Pachyveria is called Jeweled Crown. It has pale, bluish-green leaves that are tinged with red around the edges. It would look gorgeous in a spring or summer bouquet!

Our Pick
Pachyveria Scheideckeri "Jeweled Crown"
$14.95

Shown and sold from 4-inch pots, shipped bare-root where possible. By PlantsandPaws.

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7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
colorful Pachyveria bouquet @the.dusty.jewel

Haworthia

Haworthias are an unexpected addition to a bridal bouquet, but we think they look great! Just take a look at the Haworthia in the photo below (it’s the pointy, spotted plant in the top- center). We think it really shines in that bouquet! It adds some beautiful texture to the arrangement and makes it more unique overall.

Haworthias come in a lot of different shapes, so if pointy leaves aren’t your thing, you’re sure to find one you love! Some look a lot like Pachyveria and have plump green leaves arranged in a rosette. Others look a lot like Aloes and have triangular leaves. Any Haworthia you choose will add something special to your bouquet, so you really can’t go wrong!

Our Pick
Haworthia Marginata
$32.99

Haworthia Marginata Hybrid. Each of the plant diameter approx. 5cm. Ready for planting (Rooted).

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7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
Haworthia arrangement @cool_clayflowers

There you have it! Those are the best succulents for wedding arrangements according to us here at Succulent City. Which one is your favorite? We’re partial to the Aeonium and Burro’s Tail, but let us know which one you love in the comments section below! And if you’ve had your own succulent bouquet, share your photos with us! Share them in our Facebook group— Succulent City Plant Lounge.

Did this article inspire your inner succulent- fanatic? Check out these additional articles— Summer vs Winter Succulents- What’s the Difference, 8 Blue Succulents You Need in Your Garden, and How to Water Air Plants.

Have some time before your wedding? We have a great opportunity for you where you can test out a variety of succulents before you make your decision about your wedding arrangements… Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 300 varieties of succulents, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, or bouquet! If this idea excites you, then be sure to go to Succulents Box and start your low-cost subscription.

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks, ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even added a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to subscribe with your email on our front page. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Happy planting, friends!

 

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