6 Best Indoor Succulents And Everything You Need To Know

6 Best Succulents for Indoor Gardens

When it comes to being a plant parent, succulents are easy fan favorites. Most types of succulents are easy to take care of, requiring relatively little attention compared to flowers and other houseplants.

And though succulents are a great, low-maintenance way to bring some green life into your home, some species of succulents are rather fussy when it comes to the amount of sunlight and temperatures they need to survive, while others can’t deal with the dry air that comes with being indoors.

Worse, some succulents are even known to be toxic to animals, so even though they might thrive in indoor environments, they might not be the best roommates for your furry friends.

Luckily, some succulents were seemingly made to sit atop your mantle without posing any threats to your animals or needing much effort when it comes to their watering schedules and positioning in the sun. Check out the best indoor succulents to add to your collection.

1. Burro’s Tail (Sedum morganianum)

Hanging Burros Tail Succulent Plant
Burro’s Tail Succulent Image: @plant.heart.city

The Burro’s Tail succulent is unlike the short, stubby plants you might picture when you hear the word “succulent.” As it ages, it gets pretty leggy, making it a great hanging plant as opposed to one you might place on a table or mantle. Even so, the Burro’s Tail thrives indoors where temperatures remain around the 70s. According to Nell at Joy Us Garden, a Burro’s Tail does need at least 4 hours of sun a day, but a bright shade or a partial sun will do. Plus, the ASPCA reports that this succulent won’t do your pets any harm.

We have an article you can check out here all about Burro’s Tail.

2. Haworthia

Potted Haworthia Succulent Plant in Bucket Planter
Haworthia Image: @hinterland_plants

According to Baylor Chapman, author and founder of florist company Lila B. Design, Haworthias are “tough, tough, tough” — in a good way, of course. According to Our House Plants, Haworthias can survive through just about anything, and even tolerate periods of neglect pretty well (meaning you can go on vacation without checking in to make sure your friends remember to come over and care for it). They do best without a lot of direct sunlight and are perfectly fine in average temperatures.

At only around three to five inches tall, the small plant can pretty much go anywhere in your house without having to be repotted. And though its relative, Aloe Vera, is very poisonous to both humans and animals if ingested, the Haworthia is a safe indoor companion.

Check out our article about this interesting Zebra Plant – Haworthia Fasciata!

3. Copper Spoons (Kalanchoe orgyalis)

Copper Spoons Succulent Plant
Copper Spoons Succulent Image: @ecophilia

What sets this taller, tree-like plant apart from other succulents is its velvety copper leaves. It has a high heat-tolerance, so you can place it in those full-sun spots in your house that many other plants can’t handle. Plus, “it’s indestructible!” Flora Grubb Gardens garden designer Daniel Nolan told Sunset. “You can go on vacation for a month and not kill it.” Though Copper Spoons can apparently get up to a meter tall, they’re slow growers and when grown indoors, remain relatively small.

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4. Echeveria

Echeveria Succulent Plant Close Up
Echeveria Succulent Plant Image: @erikassucculents

According to Certified Urban Agriculturalist Bonnie L. Grant, “Echeveria care is practically foolproof.” It doesn’t get much better than that! Youngs Garden Shop explains that these succulents prefer placement in bright filtered light, such as natural sunlight through a window, and urges keeping it in that same spot as “dramatic changes in lighting can stress plants out.” They don’t need any fertilizer and you only have to water them once the soil is dry, so your life with an Echeveria will be pretty stress-free!

5. Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

Ponytail Palm Succulent Plant
Ponytail Palm Image: @jensjunglelife

If you love the look of palm trees but don’t live in the right climate, consider a Ponytail Palm. Though they are a type of succulent, their long leaves and thin trunk are deceiving! Like palm trees, Ponytails do best in full sun but are capable of surviving in lower light as well — it just might not get as large. Though Ponytails can reach about eight feet tall fully grown, they don’t need to be repotted and don’t require much watering.

6. Air Plant

Hanging Air Succulent Plant
Air Succulent Plant Image: @botanicalware

For those who can’t stand the thought of having to clean up any stray clumps of dirt in the house, you’re gonna love this: Air Plants can grow without soil. Seriously! According to Nell at Joy Us Garden, these special succulents grow by attaching themselves to other plants (but don’t worry — they’re not parasitic). They thrive in bright, indirect light, and as for temps, they like it pretty close to the same way we all do — below 90 and above freezing. Simple.

When it comes to watering, Air Plants do differ a bit from your typical succulents. You can easily spray them with water from a spray bottle, which you should do about one to two times a week, depending on how dry or humid the air in your house is. “But what they really like is to be soaked,” according to Nell from Joy Us Garden, a process that will keep your Air Plant happy for as long as two weeks. “The best way to water an air plant is to submerge it in a dish of water for 12 hours,” according to HGTV. “Air plants only take up as much water as they need, so you won’t overwater by doing this.”


Did you enjoy reading this post? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Last update on 2021-10-07 / Amazon

7 Best Succulents for Beginners

7 Best Succulents for Beginners

There are two types of people in this world: those who have that “green thumb” and can manage to make even typical garden weeds look like intricate floral arrangements and those whose homes are basically planted cemeteries.

I’m definitely of the latter persuasion, which I learned when I somehow managed to completely botch my first foray into succulent parenthood (it turns out that, while succulents are just about the easiest, most low-maintenance plants there are, they still do need some water and sunlight).

To be fair, I wasn’t really aware that there are many, many different types of succulents (something I probably could’ve found out with a simple Google search, but I digress) — including those that are perfect for people still working on turning that thumb green.

The best succulents for beginners have a few things in common.

For one, they require very little vigilance. Maybe you’re looking to bring a little life into your house without also having to worry too much about actually keeping it alive with a precise watering schedule. Secondly, they can survive in just about any climate. And, of course, they look gorgeous, bringing a modern feel to your space without needing any kind of special arrangement expertise.

So if you’re wondering where to begin, here are a few ideas to lead you in the right direction.

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1. Golden Barrel Cactus (Echinocactus grusonii)

Golden Barrel Cactus and Picture Frames
Golden Barrel Cactus Image: @flowersbyren_

Affectionately (and hilariously) known as the “mother-in-law’s cushion,” the Golden Barrel Cactus is one of the best succulents for beginners because it’s very drought-tolerant and doesn’t require much attention to do its thing. According to House Plants Expert, this cactus thrives indoors as long as it has enough sunshine. In the warmer months, you’ll need to water it when its soil starts drying out, but in the winter you’ll find you barely have to water it at all.

They grow fast, so you will have to repot it when it’s young. In fact, Tom Jesch from Altman Plants explained in a YouTube video that they can get up to 400 pounds in the wild. Assuming you don’t have that much room for a succulent, you don’t have to worry all that much about a giant cactus taking over your home. The growth rate slows down as it ages, and takes about 10 years to reach a full 10 inches across, so you’d have to have it for a while before it got that big.

2. Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera in White Potted Planter
Aloe Vera Image: @aloegal604

Not only is Aloe Vera the perfect succulent for people prone to getting sunburn, but it’s also a pretty easy plant to take care of. They thrive indoors and don’t need much sunlight — according to the Farmer’s Almanac, indirect sunlight or even artificial light will do. Best of all, you only have to remember to water it every three weeks. As Nell from Joy Us Garden wrote, “easy does it” when it comes to watering an aloe plant.

3. Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)

Sago Palm Succulent Next to Blonde Female
Sago Palm Image: @monicaraymondlynch

You can grow the versatile Sago Palm indoors or outdoors, and it can even survive in temperatures below zero. While young plants require a little more attention (they’ll need watering once a week or so, according to the San Francisco Chronicle), as they mature you’ll only need to water it when the soil dries out. The Sago Palms are also incredibly resistant when it comes to pests, which means you don’t have to worry about it falling victim to any mites hanging around your house.

4. Zebra Haworthia (Haworthia fasciata)

Two Zebra Haworthia Succulents in Blue & Tan Planters
Zebra Haworthia Image: @stayinalivesucculents

This gorgeous “zebra plant” looks a lot like Aloe Vera, but you’ll be able to tell it apart from the healing plant thanks to its white stripes. Like Aloe, Haworthia succulents don’t need direct sunlight or much water, making them a great addition to the home of someone missing that green thumb. These particular succulents also tell you when they need watering — well, sort of. According to Vegged Out, a Haworthia’s leaves are a good indicator of whether or not they need a drink, taking a lot of the guesswork out of caring for your plant.

5. Echeveria

Echeveria Succulent in Tiny Planter
Echeveria Image: @hollyoftherain

According to Certified Urban Agriculturalist Bonnie L. Grant, Echeveria succulents were basically made for people without much succulent know-how. “The Echeveria succulent plant is just such a specimen, thriving on brief periods of neglect and low water and nutrients,” she wrote for Gardening Know How. “Echeveria care is practically foolproof and grows well in either containers or toasty garden beds.” Sold.

6. Panda Plant (Kalanchoe tomentosa)

Panda Plant Succulent Close Up
Panda Plant Image: @jialailai

Panda Plants have a cool name and even cooler leaves, which have a velvet look to them and are soft to the touch. While they need a good amount of (indirect) sunlight, they’re pretty forgiving when it comes to watering. They typically store water in those fuzzy leaves of theirs which lets you get away with forgetting a watering cycle every once in a while.

7. Living Stones (Lithops)

Living Stones Succulent in Planter Held in Hand
Living Stones Image: @jardines_flora

Living Stones might not be the prettiest succulents on the list, but hey — they’re easy to care for, and that’s what’s important, right? While you may not want these as standalone plants, they’re cute little additions to terrariums that look like you made a lot of effort when really, they’re good at taking care of themselves.

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

7 Poisonous Succulents Harmful to Cats and Dogs

7 Succulents That Are Poisonous to Cats and Dogs

With so many different types of succulents, choosing the right one for your home can be overwhelming. There are a lot of questions to consider: how much natural light does your home have? Do you have time to follow a strict watering schedule? And perhaps most importantly, are succulents poisonous to cats and dogs?

While succulents are beautiful on the outside, beneath the surface of some succulents lie certain toxins that could make your pets sick.

According to veterinarian and author Dr. David Gross, most animals are instinctually smart enough to avoid poisonous succulents. However, if your dogs and cats have a proven history of getting into things they shouldn’t — which, let’s face it, is what dogs and cats are best at — you’ll probably want to consider keeping these toxic succulents out of your home and away from your pets.

If you’re not sure whether or not a succulent is poisonous to cats and dogs, you can check the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) to find out for sure. We’ve also rounded up some of the most popular succulents that don’t do well with pets.

1. Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)

Sago Palm is Poisonous to Cats and Dogs
Sago Palm succulent plant. @theplantagenda

Though the sago palm might look like a palm tree, it’s actually considered a succulent. The sago palm is popular especially among beginner succulent lovers thanks to its general hardiness. But if you also have cats and dogs in your house, you may want to think twice about bringing one into your home.

According to the VCA Hospitals website, the sago palm is toxic all around, but especially its seeds which also happen to be easy to get to and eat. Sago palms have cycasin in them, which attacks the liver. The ASPCA reports that symptoms of cycasin poisoning include vomiting, increased thirst, and liver failure among others, and in worst cases even death. Symptoms generally appear within 15 minutes of ingestion, but may sometimes take up to a few hours to surface.

2. Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera is it poisonous to cats or dogs?
Inside the aloe vera succulent plant. @travel.laloo

While aloe vera might be known for its healing properties, the popular succulent can be dangerous to cats and dogs. Though the actual aloe gel isn’t toxic (it’s actually edible), according to veterinarian Dr. Joe Musielak, pet lovers have to be wary of the sap inside aloe leaves.

“The latex of aloe is considered a purgative (a substance that empties the intestinal tract usually by inducing diarrhea),” Dr. Musielak said in an interview with Pilchuck Veterinary Hospital. “If an animal eats quite a bit of the plant (and it is very bad tasting), you could see mild stomach upset. Severe diarrhea can be life-threatening because it can eventually cause dehydration.”

3. Pencil Cactus (Euphorbia tirucalli)

Pencil Cactus is it poisonous to cats or dogs?
Lady carrying Pencil Cactus. @thegoodrichwife

Thanks to the thorns that often accompany cacti, most animals learn pretty early on not to go near them. However, despite its name, the pencil cactus isn’t really a cactus and isn’t toxic because of thorns — in fact, it doesn’t even have any. Instead, cat and dog lovers should be wary of the sap that pencil cacti produce, which is a source of latex.

The ASPCA explains that a pencil cactus’ sap can cause vomiting. It’s also “been implicated as a potential carcinogen and, if it gets in the eyes, is said to cause temporary blindness,” according to the Associated Press.

4. Jade Plant (Crassula argentina)

Jada Plant is it poisonous to cats or dogs?
Tiny Jade Plant in mini planter. @morandocomplantas

While jade poisoning in animals has been shown to include symptoms like vomiting, depression, and lack of coordination, the ASPCA doesn’t know exactly why. While the source of toxicity is unknown as of now, according to Wag Walking, dogs specifically can’t digest plant material, so they tend to exhibit only mild to moderate symptoms.

Learn more about one of this succulent sister, The Crassula Ovata

5. Panda Plant (Kalanchoe tomentosa)

Panda Plant is it poisonous to cats or dogs?
The pretty panda plant. @smartplantapp

Despite sharing fuzzy features with your pet and bearing the name of an animal, panda plants are not pet-friendly. According to the ASPCA, these succulents produce insoluble calcium oxalate crystals that can get stuck in your pet’s mouth and cause oral irritation, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

Veterinarian Tina Wismer notes that the ingestion of these crystals typically isn’t fatal and can easily be treated with milk or water. “Prognosis is good and clinical signs usually resolve within 24 hours with no lasting effects,” she wrote for DVM360.

6. Snake Plant (Sansevieria tariffsciata)

Snake Plant is it poisonous to cats or dogs?
Baby Snake Plant. @heartmeadows

Snake plants are another beginner-friendly succulent. But thanks to the saponins they produce, they’re poisonous to both cats and dogs. According to the ASPCA, animals that eat plants that produce saponins might experience nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Further, Dr. Gross explained to My Edmonds News that “some animals may rub against these plants and will develop, with repeated skin exposure, an allergic dermatitis.”

7. Kalanchoe

Vibrant Kalanchoe Plant. @rocketfarms_wholesale

Panda plants aren’t the only members of the Kalanchoe family that are toxic to cats and dogs. The Kalanchoe plant flowers produce Bufadienolides (extra points if you know how to pronounce that!). According to the ASPCA, this toxin can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and even an abnormal heart rate.

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If you already have any of these succulents in your home, it’s important to make sure they’re out of reach from your pets. And while it may be hard to pinpoint exactly what makes your pet sick, if you suspect your animal has ingested any of these poisonous succulents it’s important to call your vet or reach out to the Animal Poison Control Center for help.

If you liked this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

12 Stunning Minimalist Succulent Planters

12 Stunning Minimalist Succulent Planters

Minimalist designs have become increasingly trendy in recent years, and no plants are more minimalist in nature than succulents.

Homes with minimalist aesthetics are free of clutter and have simple color schemes. They’re open and airy with simple black and white tones.

Like minimalist homes, succulents are rather minimalist plants that require little work. Many of them are small with muted tones and their looks aren’t overbearing, making them perfect accent pieces to other simple decors.

Of course, no matter what types of succulents you prefer, they need a home of their own. Check out these stunning minimalist succulent planters that’ll flawlessly match your aesthetic.

Succulent Pots, ZOUTOG White Mini 3.15 inch Ceramic Flower...
11" Plant pots self-Watering Succulent pots – Easy Succulent...
Succulent Pots 6 Pack, Laerjin 3 Inch Succulent Planters with...
Succulent Pots, ZOUTOG White Mini 3.15 inch Ceramic Flower...
11" Plant pots self-Watering Succulent pots – Easy Succulent...
Succulent Pots 6 Pack, Laerjin 3 Inch Succulent Planters with...

Last update on 2021-10-07 / Amazon

1. Mid-Century Modern Planter

These planters are just about as simple and clean as it gets! Coming in two sizes, these simple ceramic planters are the perfect addition to your home. Plus, the wooden stand adds a splash of tasteful color.

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10/21/2021 05:29 pm GMT

2. Round Planter Bowl with Wood Stand

In a similar fashion, this planter bowl replicates the mid-century modern look, wooden stand, and all. However, it’s ideal for those looking for more of a centerpiece than a single planter. The large 10-inch wide bowl is ideal for holding many different types of succulents at once.

 

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10/21/2021 06:55 pm GMT

3. Two-Toned Textured Planter

If you’re looking for a little texture, these stone planters bring the quirk. At 3 inches deep they’re great for those small desktop succulents. And though they have some color (these planters come in green and beige), the colors are muted enough to blend in seamlessly with their simple, minimalist surroundings.

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4. Ceramic Cone-Shaped Planter with Brass Stand

Into the texture but not quite the colors? Go a bit simpler with this textured, cone-shaped planter. The small brass stand adds a modern feel to the otherwise super minimalist design.

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10/22/2021 02:54 am GMT

5. Ceramic Glaze Planter

At only about 2×2 inches, these cute planters are minimalistic by nature. The ceramic planters come in five different glazes, but the colors are soft enough so that they’ll complement any room in your house instead of overtaking it.

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10/22/2021 04:10 am GMT

6. Ceramic Hexagon Planter

If you’re trying to keep it super simple, these small ceramic planters are exactly what you’re looking for. The included bamboo trays (along with your beautiful succulents, of course!) add just a tiny pop of color to the otherwise clean design.

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10/21/2021 11:10 pm GMT

7. Brass and Glass Geometric Terrarium

The only thing more minimalistic than all white? All glass! This terrarium allows you to check out your succulents from all angles. Plus, the brass edges add just the right amount of oomph.

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10/21/2021 04:19 pm GMT

8. Geometric Hanging Planter

Are your walls looking a little bare? Instead of putting up another photo or painting, why not hang these geometric planters. Fill them with succulents like air plants for a simple, easy-to-maintain look. Or, for a more dramatic addition, the draping burro’s tail succulent would look absolutely stunning in these wall planters.

Our Pick
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10/22/2021 04:29 am GMT

9. Unglazed Cement Planter

For a truly earthy look, these unglazed cement planters are the way to go. Nothing is more minimalist than pure cement. Plus, it’s really making a design comeback, so you’ll be right on trend with this decor.

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10/22/2021 05:39 am GMT

10. Set of 3 Cement Planters with Wood Stand

If you’re into the cement look, this set of three succulent planters complete with matching wood stand will help bring succulent plant life into your home. Simple yet attractive, this set will help keep your succulents organized in style.

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11. Concrete Skull Planter

You can go minimalist while still adding a bit of flair. These cute cement skull planters bring some unexpected life (or death?) to your aesthetic. Plant your succulent and you have yourself a minimalist chia pet.

Concrete Skull Planter | Succulent City
24.95

Hand-poured concrete skull planter, great for any small cacti or succulent. These pieces sit about 5 inches tall, and have a small drainage hole.

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12. White Matte Ceramic Planter

There’s no denying that at its core, minimalist design favors black and white tones. Go back to basics with these simple, white matte planters. The geometric design comes in a few different shapes — and you get all six!

Our Pick
OAMCEG 2.75 inch White Ceramic Succulent Planter, Set of 6
$13.68

BEAUTIFUL, STYLISH MINI SUCCULENT POTS - Set of 6 White Ceramic plant pots, features a drainage hole and bamboo tray at the bottom for proper draining of live plants.


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10/21/2021 03:29 pm GMT

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Did any of these planters spark your interest, and now you’re ready to buy every single succulent to fill them? We have a solution for you! Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today!

Check out our article on the 6 Best Marble Planters for Succulents if you want some more inspiration! And to help you decide which succulents would look fabulous in your new planters, check out our additional articles on 7 Best Succulents for Low Light Environments, 5 Succulents with Red Flowers, or Everything About Dolphin Succulents.

Thanks for reading and learning with us. If you have any other awe-worthy planters that you’d love to share, head over to our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge, and display them!

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Happy planting! ?

When Should You Really Water Your Succulents

When you should water you succulents?

Everyone praises succulents as being really easy to care for, so it’s kind of embarrassing when one dies on you.

Don’t worry, you (probably) don’t have a brown thumb. There are a few misconceptions about how to care for succulents well. You really only have to straighten out one thing to become a succulent maven – watering.

How often to water succulents?

Here’s a little-known secret for succulent care – the amount that you water succulents isn’t nearly as important as how often you water them.

It makes sense if you consider why succulents are so sensitive to water.

Since most succulents and cacti are native to dry, desert-y conditions, they have adaptations to prevent water loss. That thick waxy sheen on the leaves is called a “cuticle” and it prevents water from evaporating out of the leaves. Succulents even have a special version of photosynthesis (called CAM photosynthesis) where they only open their pores at night to minimize water loss.

These plants are really good at retaining water. So good, in fact, that they can accidentally drown themselves. Plants actually breathe mostly through their roots, believe it or not. If those roots are wet, they can’t breathe.

Succulent roots have evolved to act like every drop of water might be the last. They cling jealously to all the water they can find in their soil. Unfortunately, if the soil is constantly wet, it leads to root rot – a deadly illness for most plants (and succulents are particularly susceptible).

The number one killer of succulents is overwatering. But not in the sense that they get too much water – rather, they get watered too often. It’s absolutely crucial that the soil is given time to dry out between waterings.

So how often do you actually water a succulent or cactus? A good rule of thumb is to water once every 10 days. You should still check to be sure that the soil is dry (and has been for a couple days) before you water again.

How much to water succulents?

Now we know when to water our succulents and cacti, but not how much.

To figure this out, we go back to the desert these plants came from. It does actually rain in the desert, contrary to common belief. However, that only happens a couple times a year. And in the desert the saying “When it rains, it pours.” is very accurate. The sky just dumps buckets of water. Succulents like to be watered this way too, albeit a bit more often. Forget about the eyedroppers and spray bottles. Put those ‘succers’ under the faucet and drench them. You should water until the water begins to run out of the bottom of the pot. That’s how you know you’ve soaked the soil all the way through.

And that part is important – you want to ensure that all of the soil is completely wetted. If you use only a little water, it doesn’t penetrate more than the top couple of inches of soil. That forces the succulent to grow roots upwards instead of downwards. That leads to weak roots, poor stability, and an ineffective anchor for the succulent. A recipe for disaster.

Proper succulent watering technique

When you should water your succulents

While throwing your succulent in the sink is certainly a viable method, you can practice some more applied techniques for an even better effect.

We already mentioned that all the soil in the pot needs to be drenched. That’s still true. If possible, though, you should try to avoid getting water on the leaves. This opens the door to a few problems:

Mold and mildew can form in the crevices of a plant (like where the leaves meet the stem). It also provides a nice habitat for pests, who generally prefer moist environments. We recommend using a succulent watering bottle with bend watering mouth for easy control during the watering process! We really like this one by Mkono

2. Plants can’t drink through their leaves. That’s what roots are for. Any water on a leaf is being wasted.

3. Occasionally plants, even succulents, suffer from sunburn. When you leave a liquid like water on leaves while the succulent is exposed to bright sunlight, there’s a chance that the water will act like a magnifying glass and burn the leaf.

So, if you have few enough plants (or just really enjoy watering), you should water each succulent individually by pouring water at the base of the stem. Make sure to get the rest of the pot as well. If you are new to plants, we highly recommend this planting & watering tool kit.

Avoid overwatering

Water isn’t the only factor in the watering equation, actually. Soil plays a big part.

One of the qualities of soil is how much water it retains. Soil mixtures that have a lot of organic matter (stuff like peat moss, coconut coir, etc.) tend to hold a lot of water. Mixtures that mostly have minerals or inorganic matter (such as perlite or sand) don’t absorb water.

Succulents and cacti require quick-draining soil. You want the soil to dry out as quickly as possible after it’s watered. Ideally in the same day. That’s why watering in the morning is ideal – it has the whole day to evaporate.

So, grab some soil specific to succulents and cacti next time you’re out. Your plants will thank you. A quick DIY solution is to just buy a bag of perlite and mix it half and half with any other kind of soil. It’s not perfect, but it will dramatically increase drainage.

If you do not have any local places to pick up some quick-draining soil, we highly recommend this quick-draining soil from Superfly Bonsai on Amazon.

Note also that many succulents you buy (especially from big box stores) actually have a poor soil mix when they’re sold to you. You’ll probably want to repot them as soon as you’re able.

And speaking of pots – the second most important factor in preventing overwatering is having adequate drainage. That means use pots with a drainage hole. That means that teacups and terrariums aren’t optimal containers for succulents and cacti.

Without proper drainage at the bottom of a pot, water tends to pool and the roots stay wet for longer. That’s dangerous. And, no, gravel in the bottom of a pot does not constitute drainage. The water is still there. It doesn’t go anywhere.

We’re not saying you can never put them in those cutesy containers. (By the way, if you’re having trouble finding inspiration for planting succulents check out our 12 minimalistic ways to plant succulents). Just know that they might not survive it for very long or be very happy for the duration. So much for that Pinterest photo shoot you had planned, eh?

ALSO READ:

When you should water your succulents and how often

Tips for succulent watering

  • Different plants have different needs. Sometimes wildly so. Kalanchoe, for example, are pretty thirsty succulents. They begin to wilt after a week without water. The famous “butt plants”, Lithops, can only be watered three or four times a year or they promptly die. (psst: if you are looking for Lithops Seeds, we recommend these by Micro Landscape Design)
  • Always err on the side of underwatering. Succulents and cacti are literally designed to be thirsty sometimes. They can almost always bounce back from lack of water… but recovering from too much water is a dicey prospect at best.
  • If you have a community pot (a pot with multiple species of plants), water to the lowest common denominator. That means that you should water only when the “driest” plants start to get thirsty. We are following the same advice as above – it’s better for succulents to be thirsty for a while rather than overwatering.

Thanks for reading!

We hope you got some pointers on how to keep your succulent family healthy! Also, don’t forget you can receive 2 FREE Audio books of your choice from our sponsor at Audible.com. We’ve got 2 books we listen to about propagation and watering succulents, what are you thinking of listening too?

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