Why Your Succulents Keep Dying (Newbie Guide)

Whether you’re a newcomer to the succulent world just looking for a pop of color or a long-time cactus convert, succulents and cacti can often be NOT quite the low-maintenance dream they’re cracked up to be. From root rot to mealybugs, the culprits can be varied and often times confusing. But with these quick tips to help you identify and remedy whatever issue arises, you and your succulents will be happy and healthy again in no time! (That Crassula Ovata or Jade Plant will grow like no other).

Watering Your Succulents

Overwatering Succulents

Succulents are frequently native to hot, dry climates, and therefore have evolved to take advantage of every drop of water they can. (Talk about thirsty plants).

This means that when they get too much water they are at risk of developing root rot, a condition stemming from roots sitting in standing water or high-retention soil. An overwatered succulent will start to wrinkle like a finger after too long in the bath or become spongy and yellowed.

Luckily, if caught in time it is easy to fix — all it takes is not watering your plant for several days until the soil dries out completely. In order to prevent overwatering, however, you should be sure to water your succulents only about once a week and plant them in pots with plenty of drainage and soil that doesn’t retain water for very long. Check out our article about when you should water your succulents, it’s helped more than 3000 people.

Cactus and succulent friendly soil is readily available at hardware stores, nurseries, and even some grocery stores, and can also be made at home. But here are some I found on Amazon for those that like things delivered. (Including me).

Under Watering Succulents

While over saturation is by far the more common issue, it is also possible to water your succulents too little. This can occur both if your succulents are watered too infrequently, or if they are in too tall a pot. We recommend a short and stubby succulent pot. Check this 6″ Ceramic Pot out, this will give you an idea for what to keep a look out for when purchasing planters for your succulents!

Succulent and cactus roots are very shallow, so tall pots with what would generally be considered healthy drainage can draw water away from roots before they have a chance to soak it up. Under watered plants are generally relatively easy to identify, as cactuses tend to shrivel up and pucker while succulent’s upper leaves will begin to dry out and get crunchy.

The solution here is pretty clear: simply water your plant more, aiming for a good soak about once a week. It is often easiest to pick a day to be the succulent watering day, thereby making it a routine that is easy to remember and work into your lifestyle. (Plus, your succulents will look forward to this day).

Watering Succulents from Above

While this is less of an issue for cactuses, succulents often have lots of nooks and crannies near the base of the plant that will catch and retain water if watered from above. This can begin to decay the base and stem of the plant and can be challenging to notice until it is too late and the core of the plant is rotten.

If you notice leaves starting to rot from the base up it is best to pluck those leaves and attempt to remove any standing water or rotten foliage.

However, the best way to avoid this issue is to water your succulents at the base rather than with a spray bottle and avoid letting water land on the tops of the leaves.

Mineral Build Up

Tap water can be full of all manner of minerals from calcium to fluoride to chlorine. While these are all beneficial for their human uses, depending on the levels in your local tap water they can be downright harmful to succulents.

If you begin to notice a white crusty build up on your leaves or the soil around your plant, you may want to consider either switching to watering with distilled or filtered water, which can sometimes be a hassle, or simply letting your water sit for a day or so before use to let any sediments or minerals filter to the bottom of the container.

This practice, while not always necessary, can limit the amount of contact these minerals have with your succulents.

Diseases & Parasites in Your Succulent Plants

Mealy Bugs

Mealybugs are similar to the aphids that appear in outdoor gardens in that they usually show up in large numbers and leave what looks like little bits of dirt on the leaves of your succulent. Unlike aphids, however, mealybugs are generally a whitish grey and can appear on indoor plants.

They spread quickly, so how can you get rid of mealy bugs from your succulents?

The first step in quelling an infestation is always to quarantine any infested succulents. As long as that step is taken first, the follow-up treatment is relatively easy. Simply mix up a solution of three parts isopropyl alcohol to one part water and spray your succulents daily until the mealybugs clear up, usually only a couple days.

While this may sound dangerous, this solution will not burn your plants and as the alcohol evaporates quickly, you shouldn’t run into any issues with root rot. More often than not mealybugs are attracted to succulents that have been overwatered or over fertilized, so they are also a good sign to reassess how you’re caring for your succulent.

Having a mealy bug problem? Check out our guide on How to Get Rid of Mealy Bugs

Scale Insects

Scale bugs or insects are small shelled bugs of a dark brown color that attach themselves to stems or leaves and suck the moisture from your succulents. While it is best to treat them in their larval stage, they are often hard to locate and are readily treatable in adulthood too.

Unlike mealybugs, scale insects can simply be picked off by hand if you have some time. They can also be treated with the same three to one isopropyl alcohol to water solution as the mealybugs, although they may take more time to respond to the treatment due to their protective shells. (It’s like armor to them).

If you find that the alcohol solution is simply not working you can also use neem oil, which is usually available at your local hardware store. Neem oil can be very concentrated, so be sure to follow the directions on the container to avoid burning your succulents as well as the scale bug. (We definitely don’t want to hurt our baby succulents).

Luckily scale bugs are not a time-sensitive pest as long as you begin to treat them before your succulent plant starts to shrivel, so attempting several treatment methods won’t harm your beautiful succulents.

Other Succulent Pests

There are a variety of other, less common insects, fungi, and diseases that can make your succulent home, but more often than not the three to one isopropyl alcohol to water solution will kill an insect infestation and neem oil will target insects, mites, and fungi.

If you are unsure what category your infestation falls under, begin with the alcohol solution, as it can’t damage your plant. If that doesn’t work, move on to a neem oil solution while being mindful with the directions on your particular container to avoid burning your succulent.

Always begin by isolating the affected plant to avoid the issue spreading. If neither of those solutions work, consider bringing the plant into your local nursery. Like a trip to the doctors! They may be able to identify the issue more specifically and suggest another viable solution.

Succulent Home

Succulent Planter

@theurbanoasisshop

A thriving cactus or succulent will eventually outgrow its pot, either above or below the soil. Why is that? Because they are adapted to dry environments, succulents and cacti roots are shallow and tend to grow horizontally, so they can quickly outgrow a pot that is too small or narrow.

If you notice that your succulent isn’t growing anymore, or is beginning to die, it might be time to consider repotting. Rehoming your plant into a slightly larger, and specifically wider, pot can do wonders for growth and the overall health of your plant. Here’s an article we just wrote about the tips and tricks in repotting succulents, it’s quick and easy!

Succulent Climate & Temperature Tolerance

Succulents can be sensitive to extreme cold, so keeping them in above freezing temps is an important part of keeping your plant happy. A succulent that has gotten too cold can look burned, with parts of the upper leaves beginning to brown, droop, or shrivel up.

If you like to sleep with your windows open in the winter and you live in a colder environment, perhaps consider keeping your succulents in a different room when the weather begins to drop below freezing at night.

Succulent Lighting

Succulents thrive in bright sunlight, so housing them in places that don’t receive much natural light can cause stretching as they seek the light they need.

A stretching succulent will get much taller, with leaves spread widely up and down the stem to maximize the amount of light each leaf receives. If you begin to notice stretching simply move your plant to a location with more light, as once stretching has occurred it’s impossible for the plant to return to its original height.

Here’s a highly reviewed indoor grow light on Amazon we’ve found that is perfect for your indoor succulents.

When your succulent is in bright sunlight, it is also important to avoid leaving water droplets sitting on its leaves after watering, as the water can focus the light and it risks burning your leaves. This is another reason to be sure to water your plants from below the leaves. Learn how to properly propagate succulents for the most effective position for light.

ALSO READ:


Hopefully, these tips can help you identify and resolve any issues that arise during your succulent care endeavors and keep your plants healthy for years to come.

It is also important to remember that it is completely natural and healthy for some leaves to die at the plant grows. So leaves at the base of your plant drying up and falling off is NOT in any way a poor reflection of your care for your succulent family.

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on Succulent Drainage Requirements or even The Most Common Issues Amongst Succulent Growers today!

If you’re new in the succulent world, here are some beginner succulents that are quite easy to take care of when you first begin. Happy growing!

Top 5 Hanging Succulent Planters Worth Having

We think that hanging succulent planters are one of the most underrated ways to display your succulents at your home. Hanging planters add so much visual interest to living spaces and make your succulents a true focal point in your home.

If you’ve never owned any before, you may be wondering where to buy hanging planters and what to put in them. We’ve got you covered! Just keep reading to hear all about our favorite hanging planters and succulents.

Which Succulents Look Good in Hanging Planters?

Trailing succulents are great for hanging planters because they spill and cascade down the sides of the planter. They give an abundant, lush look to any container you put them in.

Our favorite trailing succulents are Burro’s Tail and String of Pearls because they both have beautiful spherical leaves. Some other great choices are String of Hearts and Little Pickles. String of Hearts succulents have green and purple leaves that resemble hearts, and Little Pickles have green, spiky leaves and long, trailing purple stems.

If we were going to put an arrangement in our hanging succulent planters, though, we wouldn’t just use trailing succulents. The key to making beautiful arrangements is contrast, so pick succulents that have different shapes, colors and textures to make your planters look more interesting. 

Learn More

 

Hanging planters for succulents
@maisonsdumondeuk

Succulent City’s Favorite Hanging Planters

We scoured the Internet looking for the best decorative succulent planters, and this is what we found. We’ve included a few of our favorite DIY planters, too, just in case you’d rather save some money and make your own!

Macrame Plant Hangers

Macrame plant hangers
@knotkaren.macrame

We love macrame plant hangers. They have a boho chic vibe and make any room you put them in look more eclectic.

These small macrame hangers are made out of durable jute rope. You can’t really hang them outside, but they look great indoors in bedrooms, living rooms and kitchens.

These hangers come in a pack of two for just $7.99, but you will have to purchase your own pots. We’d put small terracotta pots or textured white pots in these hangers, but any pot you have on hand will look great!

10 Pack Terra Cotta Pots with Drainage Holes - 2.6 inches Mini...
5 Inch Round Striped Textured White Ceramic Succulent Planter...
10 Pack Terra Cotta Pots with Drainage Holes - 2.6 inches Mini...
5 Inch Round Striped Textured White Ceramic Succulent Planter...
10 Pack Terra Cotta Pots with Drainage Holes - 2.6 inches Mini...
10 Pack Terra Cotta Pots with Drainage Holes - 2.6 inches Mini...
5 Inch Round Striped Textured White Ceramic Succulent Planter...
5 Inch Round Striped Textured White Ceramic Succulent Planter...

Last update on 2020-10-25 / Amazon

We love planters that incorporate natural materials, so these jute hanging planters are just our style. But if you’d rather make your own, you can fashion some plant hangers out of jersey fabric. All you need besides the fabric is a few household tools and thirty minutes. Get the full instructions here.

Striped Ceramic Hanging Planters

Via Amazon

We’re obsessed with multicolor, so when we saw these planters, we knew we had to put them on this list! They come in a set of three for just $19.99, so they’re an absolute bargain.

These pots have a  beautiful top stripe, and are available in colors like light grey and a powder blue. The stripes only cover about the top inch of each pot, and the rest is painted either white, grey, or blue. This gives them a really clean, minimalistic look that will go with any decor.

These planters are suspended from durable cotton rope that won’t break. They have drainage holes, but come with plugs that you can use to stop the flow of water whenever you want. They’re ceramic and hand glazed, which we never would’ve expected at this price point!

We think that a Zebra Plant or variegated Snake Plant would look gorgeous in these planters. Any green succulent will look amazing, though, because it will pop against the white part of the planter.

Decorative Geometric Wall Planters

Geometric succulent wallplanter
@suspend.it

Some people might argue that wall planters aren’t true hanging planters, but since you hang them up on a wall, we’re including these geometric ones anyway! I mean, just look at them… we couldn’t leave them out. These planters have a modern, geometric design that’s to die for. 

Each planter has a unique gold frame that’s shaped like a diamond. It holds up a mini white pot that can house one small succulent like a Haworthia, Echeveria or Aloe plant. These planters would look great in bathrooms, hallways, or anywhere else in your home where you want a touch of greenery. 

Even though these wall planters are pretty cheap, you can save even more money by making your own. Our favorite DIY project actually uses coffee mugs as the planters and simple hooks to hang them on the wall. You can use coffee mugs that you already have in your home, but we think that these adorable cactus mugs would make this DIY even cuter!

Pastel Blue Mini Planter Set

Via Amazon

The rest of the planters on this list are pretty neutral, so we had to include a pop of color with these fun pastel blue mini planters. They come in other colors too, but we think you should take a chance and go with the blue!

These planters are made of ceramic that has a beautiful shine to it. Despite being ceramic, they’re very lightweight. They come with twine rope that you can use to suspend them from your ceiling, which we definitely recommend doing. Their unique globe shape makes them look amazing when you hang them up high up against a wall.

These planters also have drainage holes, which is a big plus. They come as a set of four for $14.99, which we think is a great deal for what you get.

These planters are on the smaller side, so we’d only put one or two plants in each one to avoid overcrowding. We love the way that bright green succulents look up against aqua, so we’d probably put a String of Pearls in one and a cactus in the other.

But colored succulents, especially orange ones, would look great in these planters too, so get creative and put whatever you want in them!

Round Metal Hanging Planter

Metal succulent hanging planter
Via Amazon

We’ve saved this one for last because it’s an absolute showstopper! This planter has a pretty gold pot, but that’s not what makes it special. The pot is encircled by a shiny gold hoop, so it looks more like a sculpture than a plant pot. It’s modern and elegant and everything we’ve ever wanted in a succulent planter. We’ve never clicked the “buy now” button so fast!

This planter isn’t just pretty—it’s functional and durable, too. Unlike a lot of decorative planters, this one has a drainage hole. Drainage holes are super important for succulent health because they can rot if they sit in too much water. You can rest easy knowing that’s not going to happen with this pot.

You’ll also be glad to know that this planter is durable enough for outdoor use. It’s made of sturdy metal materials and has an iron chain instead of a rope one, so it can withstand wind. No matter where you put it, this planter is guaranteed to be a conversation starter!


We hope that this post has given you plenty of hanging planter ideas!. We got a few new ideas, and a few new hanging planters—we couldn’t resist purchasing that stunning, gold circular one!

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Which planter is your favorite? Let us know in the comments below. Happy shopping, and happy planting!

How to Grow Hens and Chicks Succulents

Growing hens and chicks (Sempervivum tectorum) plants in your garden is quite simple, especially if you want a lot of them. Their offsets keep coming!

Hens and chicks have beautiful rosettes that come in colors like red, green, blue, and copper. They grow like nobody’s business and produce tons of baby plants cutely called chicks, so it’s likely that you’ll never have to buy more than one Hen.

Hens and chicks are easy to care for and can thrive indoors or outdoors, so they’re the perfect plant for pretty much everyone!

If you want to keep your Sempervivum tectorum looking like spring chickens, then you’re going to need our advice! Find out how to grow hens and chicks in your own garden.

How to Grow Hens and Chicks Succulents
Growing hens and chicks (Sempervivum tectorum) plants is quite simple, especially if you want a lot of them. Their offsets keep coming! @joske.anoebis.goa

Hens and chicks

I bet you’re probably wondering why this plant has such a weird name! It’s called hens and chicks or hens and chickens because it produces a lot of offsets, which are also known as chicks.

In case you didn’t know, offsets are baby succulents that sprout from mature plants, in this case, called Hen. The mother plant “hatches” baby chicks just like a hen does, so that’s how it got its quirky name hens and chicks!

Binomial nomenclatureSempervivum tectorum
Other namesHens and chicks, hen and chickens, hen-and-chicks, hens-and-chickens, houseleek, roof houseleek, hen-widdies
SizeThey can grow up to be up to 4 inches tall
pH6.6 to 7.5
SunFull Sun to Part Sun
ClimateCold Hardy, Winter Vegetables
Growing LocationsThroughout the US
GroundSandy, Excellent Drainage
WaterLow, Drought Tolerant

Sempervivum tectorum

Hens and chicks are also called Sempervivum tectorum. Serpevivum means “always living” in Latin. Sempervivum plants got this name because they sprout many offsets that live on after the mother plant dies.

Sempervivums are also called houseleeks because they used to be planted on thatched roofs to keep them from catching on fire during lightning storms. They store a lot of water in their leaves, so it makes sense that they would prevent fires from spreading.

How to care

Hens and chicks are native to the mountains of Europe, so they’ve adapted to cold weather and are considered a winter vegetable. Even though they’re tough and can withstand less than ideal conditions, there are still a few things you need to know to keep them healthy. Here are some of our best caretaking tips for hens and chicks.

The best soil

If you’ve read our other plant guides, you already know that you need to put your plants in well-draining soil. We talk about drainage so often because it’s super important!

If your hens and chicks get waterlogged, it may get mushy leaves, start to attract pests, or die from root rot. Nobody wants that!

Planting your succulent in cactus or succulent soil will prevent your plant from sitting in water and meeting an untimely end. Commercial succulent soil is a good choice because it contains porous materials like perlite and pumice that improve drainage and keep your plant nice and dry.

We highly recommend this soil mix as it is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. We like to get a large bag as we propagate a lot of plants. It is useful to always have soil on hand for any plant project.

Hoffman Horticultural Perlite, 18 Quarts, Size: Single
Nature's Footprint Pumice Soil amendment, 3-Gallon
Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil - Jacks Gritty Mix #111-1...
Hoffman Horticultural Perlite, 18 Quarts, Size: Single
Nature's Footprint Pumice Soil amendment, 3-Gallon
Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil - Jacks Gritty Mix #111-1...
-
-
$39.98
$21.04
$21.95
Hoffman Horticultural Perlite, 18 Quarts, Size: Single
Hoffman Horticultural Perlite, 18 Quarts, Size: Single
-
$39.98
Nature's Footprint Pumice Soil amendment, 3-Gallon
Nature's Footprint Pumice Soil amendment, 3-Gallon
$21.04
Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil - Jacks Gritty Mix #111-1...
Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil - Jacks Gritty Mix #111-1...
-
$21.95

Last update on 2020-10-25 / Amazon

 

How to water

Watering your hens and chicks plants every two weeks is usually enough, but watch out for signs of under watering like dry, wrinkly leaves.

Fill up a watering can and douse the soil until water runs out of the pot’s drainage hole. In between these deep waterings, let the plant’s ground dry out completely.

Doing this encourages your hens and chicks to develop a healthy root system because its roots will grow deeper as it searches the soil for more water. Letting the soil dry out also prevents root rot.

Light requirements

Hens and chicks can handle anything from partial shade to full sun. Their fleshy leaves are a bit delicate and can burn during the hottest months of the year, so if you keep your succulent outdoors, watch out for signs of sunburn like brown, faded, or crispy leaves.

It’s a good idea to invest in some shade cloth to keep your outdoor succulents cooler on hot days. You should also water your plants more frequently during hot weather to cool down the soil.

Temperature and climate

Hens and chicks are cold hardy plants, which means they can survive in below-freezing temperatures. Even if the temperature drops to negative 40 degrees, your plant baby will still be ok. Sempervivum tectorum can thrive in winters thanks to their cold-hardy attributes.

A lot of plants can’t handle temps like that—the water they store in their leaves freezes from the cold and make the leaves brown and mushy. Their ability to survive in cold weather is just one of the many things that make Hens and Chicks remarkable!

Even though this succulent is cold-hardy, it grows best in mild temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees. So growing hens and chicks indoors is not only possible, but also good for them as long as they get enough light.

Keep them near a bright window like the south or east-facing window for the best results.

Fertilizing

Hens and chicks can survive in nutritionally poor ground, so you don’t absolutely need to fertilize them. You probably want your plant to grow more quickly and look more vibrant, though, so you should fertilize it once every month or two during the spring and summer.

The best fertilizer for hens and chicks is a low-balanced, water-soluble fertilizer. Low-balanced fertilizers are milder and have less of a chance of burning the leaves of your plant. When you’re buying a fertilizer, look for one that has three small, identical numbers on the package, like 8-8-8.

Even though you’re using a mild fertilizer, you should still dilute it to half strength. Hens and chicks don’t need as much fertilizer as other plants, so you don’t want to give yours as much as the package calls for. Standard fertilizers generally call for 1 tablespoon of fertilizer per gallon of water, but you should only use ½ tablespoon.

 

Do Hens and Chicks Bloom?

Some succulents use up all of their resources in order to produce flowers and seeds, which leaves nothing for the rest of the plant. Succulents that die after they flower are called monocarpic succulents.

Hens and chicks flower and die after about three or four years. Your plant may flower earlier if it’s under stress from not getting enough water or sunlight. It flowers early to try and spread its seed in the hopes that the new plants will grow somewhere with better conditions. Even if you take care of your plant perfectly, though, it will eventually flower and die.

When this happens to your hens and chicks, try not to be upset! You can save the seeds from the flowers and plant them to grow brand new babies.

Plus, your main plant probably produced a lot of chicks before it died that will grow and take its place.

Growing and Propagating

Hens and Chicks have no trouble growing and propagating on their own, but if you want even more plants, you can grow them from seed. You can harvest seeds from your mature plant after it flowers or purchase them online.

Mother plant

If you’d rather not go to the trouble of growing succulents yourself (we don’t blame you), your hens and chicks plant will do the work for you. It produces lots of offsets that you can divide from the mother plant and put in their own pots.

Growing from Seeds

Grab a pot or planting tray and fill it up with some succulent or cactus soil.

With clean hands, take the seeds of hens and chicks and place them on top of the soil. Since the seeds are so tiny, it can be hard to see where you’re putting them, so just do your best to space them out a little.

After they’re in the soil, make sure you remember to mist them with some water. Keep them moist over the next few weeks until they germinate. Give them access to plenty of sunlight and keep them in a warm room that’s between 70 and 75 degrees if you can.

It’s unlikely that all of your seeds will germinate, so keep that in mind. Don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t work out the first time… keep trying!

Dividing Offsets

Hens and chicks seeds don’t always produce new plants that look like the mature plant they came from. If you want your chicks to retain the characteristics of your hen, the best way to do that is by dividing offsets.

Most hens and chicks varieties grow offsets from a stem that’s attached to the mother plant. That stem is called a stolon. It’s best to wait until the stolon withers to replant these offsets. By the time the stolon withers, the offsets will have developed root systems of their own and have the best chance of surviving.

To separate this kind of offset, break or cut the stolon and carefully loosen the soil around the chick. Lift it up out of the soil and transplant it to a pot filled with succulent soil or a new spot in your garden. Wait a few days to water them so that they get a chance to adjust to their new environment.

ALSO READ:


There you have it! Those are all the things you need to know to become an expert hens and chicks gardener.

If you’d like this guide you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Even if you think you have a black thumb, don’t chicken out! Go buy yourself one. We know you’ll do a great job taking care of it. Happy planting!

8 Blue Succulents You Need in Your Succulent Garden

Don’t get us wrong, we love green succulents—but there’s something extra special about colored succulents. It’s a fun, unexpected surprise for a leafy plant to be anything but green. That’s why blue, purple, and other brightly colored succulents are some of our favorites.

If you don’t own any colorful succulents yet, we’re here to introduce you to some of the best blue ones. You’ll need to add these eight amazing blue succulents to your cart after reading this post, so we apologize in advance for fueling your plant addiction!

Aloe— ‘Blue Sky’

Aloe 'blue sky' succulent plant
Paradise Found Nursery

We go nuts for succulents with contrasting colors! This beautiful Aloe cultivar has orange spikes that perfectly compliment its pale blue leaves. Excuse us while we go buy one (or ten).

This Aloe loves full sun and high temperatures between 70 and 80 degrees. Strong, bright light will make its colors even more vibrant.

It flowers throughout the spring and summer and produces pretty orange blooms. You’ll also be glad to know that it sprouts lots of offsets. You can use them to grow brand new Blue Sky plants that you can fill your garden with!

Buy now the Blue Elf Aloe from Etsy.

Echeveria— ‘Blue Prince’

Echeveria 'blue prince' succulent plant
@nursery_time_line

We’re in love with this dark blue Echeveria! It’s native to Mexico and needs bright sunlight to achieve full vibrancy. If you want your plant to look as gorgeous as the one in the photo above, then make sure you give it plenty of bright, filtered sunlight.

When it gets enough sunlight, this plant’s leaves start to turn copper around the edges. It also sprouts reddish flowers that contrast beautifully with its dark blue leaves.

If you’re thinking about bringing it indoors once in a while, this blue succulent planter can be a great touch!

Buy it now here!

Senecio Mandraliscae— ‘Blue Chalksticks’

Senecio mandraliscae 'blue chalksticks' succulent plant
@worldofsucculents

This succulent is sometimes called Blue Fingers, and you can see why. Its blue leaves look like a bunch of long spindly fingers. These leaves can grow to be 18 inches tall, which is pretty large for a succulent. Between the height and the bold blue color, this plant will be the highlight of your garden!

Blue Chalksticks plants, not to be mistaken from these chalk sticks, spread out and make great groundcover. They’re fire resistant, so if you live in an area that’s prone to wildfires, they’re great plants to have in your garden.

These plants also attract pollinators like butterflies and hummingbirds. Can’t you just see yourself sipping some coffee by your window while a green hummingbird flies around your beautiful Blue Chalksticks?

Buy this succulent now from Etsy!

Echeveria— ‘Blue Bird’

Echeveria 'blue bird' succulent plant
@justbusywithsuccies

Isn’t this Echeveria gorgeous? We love succulents with rosettes, especially if they’re colorful. This Echeveria reminds us of flowers, especially Blue Lotus Flowers. We think that it’s such a pretty, delicate addition to any garden container.

Blue Bird plants are about as delicate as they look. You can’t leave them out in the cold or else their leaves will get brown and mushy. They prefer partial shade to full sun, perfect for indoors, so you’ll have to watch out for signs of sunburn like brown spots if you put them in a sunny location. You’ll have to be careful with the watering too, as overwatering can lead to root rot and pest infestations.

We think that the extra TLC this plant needs is worth it, though… just look at how beautiful it is! I’m sure a great modern planter like this will create great contrast with this echeveria too.

You can’t not think about having this succulent in your garden! Get it here.

Stonecrop— ‘Blue Spruce’

Stonecrop 'blue spruce' succulent plant

This succulent is called the Blue Spruce Stonecrop because its leaves look similar to the needles on blue spruce trees. In the summer, it sprouts tall pink stems topped with bright yellow flowers. This plant spreads out well and makes a pretty ground cover. It looks great in containers and arrangements, too. (Check out this geometric glass terrarium for plants).

You’ll be glad to know that this plant needs very little attention and can survive in harsher conditions. It can thrive in full sun and doesn’t need a lot of water. If you live in a hot area of the country that doesn’t get much rain, Blue Spruce Stonecrops are the plants for you!

Get them here.

ALSO READ:

Echeveria— ‘Blue Waves’

Echeveria 'blue waves' succulent plant
@suculoverscanal

We think that this stunning Echeveria looks like ocean waves and sunsets on the beach! It has blue leaves that remind us of seafoam and leaf tips that glow pink like the setting sun. It looks great in arrangements with other pink, blue, and purple hued succulents.

Like most Echeverias, it can’t handle temperatures below 30 degrees. You’ll have to take it inside when it gets cold to prevent the water in its fleshy leaves from freezing. We don’t mind if you use this plant for indoor decoration… having it inside with us gives us more chances to admire it!

If you have this beauty please share it with everyone in the Succulent City Plant Lounge, spark a conversation with us here! Every single day a succulent lover is asking for help and guidance, maybe you can help out.

 

Ferocactus Glaucescens— ‘Blue Barrel Cactus’

Cactus 'blue barrel' succulent plant
@miei_cactus

This cactus got its name because of its pale blue color and round, squat shape. It has about a dozen deep ribs and lots of sharp spines. Just like many of the other succulents on this list, it loves full sun. It has beautiful yellow blooms that last from spring to late summer. It also sprouts round, white fruit. In theory, this fruit is edible—it’s not toxic or poisonous—but we’ve heard that it’s as sour as lemons, so we don’t recommend eating it!

Barrel Cacti take a long time to grow, and even longer to form the mound that you see in the photo above, but we think they’re worth the wait! Mature plants look like sculptures when they grow in mounds and can add a lot of character to your garden.

You can get this amazing cactus here!

Pachyveri— ‘Jeweled Crown’

Pachyveria 'jeweled crown' succulent plant
@littlezurprise

Jeweled Crown plants are a hybrid of Echeveria and Pachyphytum succulents. That’s why this plant looks a lot like the Echeverias in the photo above.

Jeweled Crown plants have tight rosettes that loosen with age and slightly pointed leaves. This plant is mainly a blue-green color, but it also has a bit of pink on its leaf tips.

Just like a real jeweled crown, the colors in this succulent really shine when you put it in the sun. It can handle high temperatures, too, so don’t be afraid to keep it outside during the summer. Bring it in for the winter, though—it can’t handle temperatures below 20 degrees even for short periods of time.


There you have it! That’s our list of eight blue succulents we can’t live without. Let us know which ones you’re planning on buying in the comments below. Personally, I might have to buy the blue chalksticks succulent plant, it just looks like beautiful algae flowing in the ocean floor!

Enjoyed learning about 8 Blue Succulents You Need in Your Succulent Garden? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about Rare Succulents You Wish You Knew About. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Anyways, thanks for reading about these eight blue succulent plants and like always, happy planting!

 

How to Propagate Succulents Successfully

Welcome to the addiction.

After a person gets their first little Burro’s Tail or Jade Plant, they invariably develop an insatiable urge to acquire more at any cost. There are two ways to satisfy the craving for more succulents:

  1. Buy more succulents.
  2. Grow more succulents.

And since money, unfortunately, does not grow on succulents, it’s a lot more cost-effective to grow your own. Fortunately, succulents naturally come equipped with an amazing ability regrow from leaves or branches… and that means free plants!

There are three primary methods of succulent propagation, each of them easier than the last!

Leaf Propagation

If you’ve ever seen leaf propagation in action, you probably understand at least part of the fascination surrounding succulents. People love taking pictures of their leaf props – and for good reason! Nothing is more satisfying for a plant parent than seeing a whole new succulent grow from a mere leaf.

It may seem that you need a green thumb to pull off this amazing feat, but nothing could be further from the truth. Propagating succulents from leaves is very easy. All you have to do is pull the leaf off.

… And you’re done! No, seriously, that’s all there is to it. If you remove the leaf, nature will take care of the rest. For the sake of thoroughness, however, I’ll add some details.

  1. It’s vital that you get a clean break when separating the leaf from the succulent. That means there should be no extra plant matter left on the leaf or stem. This isn’t difficult to achieve since succulent leaves don’t really need to be persuaded to fall off (looking at you, Ghost Plant).
  2. To ensure you get that clean break, grab the leaf close to the base and wiggle it gently side to side. There shouldn’t be much “pulling” involved.
  3. Now that they’re separated, both the mother plant and the leaf have an open wound. You have to let it “callus” over (that’s the plant version of scabbing). Just set the leaf in a dry place and wait a week, a dish on the windowsill works great. (we highly recommend these propagation trays by Yield Lab). Don’t expose it to water during this period – that will slow or impair the callus formation and could allow bacteria or fungi to infect the succulent.
  4. Once the mother plant is callused, resume watering and treat it like normal. The leaf doesn’t need any special attention at the moment. Don’t water the leaf propagation until roots appear. It’s pointless since they can’t drink water without roots anyway. You may want to refer to our article about when you should water succulents if you need more information.
  5. You can put the leaf on dirt at any point, but don’t try burying it (or its roots). The succulent will take care of it.
  6. Once the roots show up, endeavor to keep them moist. Use a spray bottle to mist the leaf every couple of days. (Enter the quintessential, super affordable succulent tool kit). Keep the propagation in bright light so that the new growth doesn’t become etiolated (stretched out).
Yield Lab 10 x 20 Inch Black Plastic Propagation Tray (5 Pack)...
LepoHome 15 Pieces Succulent Transplanting Mini Garden Hand Tool...
Yield Lab 10 x 20 Inch Black Plastic Propagation Tray (5 Pack)...
LepoHome 15 Pieces Succulent Transplanting Mini Garden Hand Tool...
-
$17.95
$10.99
Yield Lab 10 x 20 Inch Black Plastic Propagation Tray (5 Pack)...
Yield Lab 10 x 20 Inch Black Plastic Propagation Tray (5 Pack)...
-
$17.95
LepoHome 15 Pieces Succulent Transplanting Mini Garden Hand Tool...
LepoHome 15 Pieces Succulent Transplanting Mini Garden Hand Tool...
$10.99

Last update on 2020-10-25 / Amazon

That’s pretty much it! It really is as simple as pulling the leaves and chucking them on some dirt. All of the nutrients, and most of the water, that they need is inside the leaf itself. After a few months, that leaf will shrivel up and fall off. Now you’ve got a whole new succulent for the cost of one leaf!

Be aware that this only works on succulents that have distinct stems and distinct leaves. Succulents like Echeveria, Sedum, Senecio, and Graptopetalum all make great candidates. If you try this with an Aloe or a Haworthia, for example, you’ll end up with a dead leaf and disappointment. Only do it if the leaf comes off easily!

Image by:@misucculents

 

Cutting Propagation

Anyone with a modicum of gardening experience will have used this technique before. It’s a trick as old as plants themselves. You cut off a part of a succulent and stick it back into the dirt and it just starts growing again.

Crazy, right?

Succulents have an even easier time of this than other plants. With herbs and veggies, you sometimes have to coax out new roots by putting the cutting in water for a while first, but that is not so with succulents.

Here’s how you propagate succulents via cuttings:

  1. Choose where to make the cut. It needs to be near the end of the branch or stem, usually 3 to 6 inches away is appropriate. You’ll also want to make sure that the plant is growing and healthy here – propagating a weak or dying plant is a recipe for failure.
  2. Clear the stem above the intended cut. Remove leaves one to two inches above the place you want to cut for two reasons: you’re going to put that part underground and also it makes it easier to get a good cut. Bonus tip – depending on the plant, you might be able to propagate succulents leaves!
  3. Make a clean cut perpendicular to the stem (the stem should be flat on top, not diagonal at all). Be sure to use really sharp, really sterile scissors. That part is important because dull scissors will crush the plant while cutting it, which makes it less likely to recover. Dirty scissors transfer germs directly into the wound – that’s no good. I highly recommend using gardening scissors or shears for this process. These gardening pruning shears by Vivoson are really really good!
  4. Allow the mother plant and the cutting to callus just as we did for leaves in the above technique. It should take between 3-10 days. Don’t let them get wet but keep them in direct light.
  5. Stick the bottom of the cutting into the dirt up to the place where the leaves start. Depending on the species of succulent, roots should start growing within a month and you can begin to water. There will be enough water in the plant already to sustain it until then.

 

We also recommend making sure you are using quality succulent soil. We highly recommend this soil mix by Bonsai Jack. It is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, it helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. 

VIVOSUN 6.5 Inch Gardening Hand Pruner Pruning Shear with...
Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil - Jacks Gritty Mix #111-1...
VIVOSUN 6.5 Inch Gardening Hand Pruner Pruning Shear with...
Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil - Jacks Gritty Mix #111-1...
-
$6.99
$21.95
VIVOSUN 6.5 Inch Gardening Hand Pruner Pruning Shear with...
VIVOSUN 6.5 Inch Gardening Hand Pruner Pruning Shear with...
$6.99
Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil - Jacks Gritty Mix #111-1...
Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil - Jacks Gritty Mix #111-1...
-
$21.95

Last update on 2020-10-25 / Amazon

In summary, snip off a bit of the succulent and stick it in the ground. It couldn’t be easier. This method only works with plants that have a pronounced stem, however. Sorry Aloe and Haworthia, that means you’re not eligible. Many of the plants we suggested for leaf propagation are also great choices here: Echeveria, Sedum, Graptosedum, Graptopetalum, etc.

This method is particularly useful because it addresses two problems:

  • It “fixes” etiolated plants. When plants have insufficient light and grow leggy, that can’t be undone. You can, however, snip out the leggy part and plant the top part again to have two plants – the base of the original (which will resume growth) and a cutting. Just make sure they get enough light this time!
  • It’s the fastest way to get new plants. Growing new succulents from leaves is easy and efficient, but slow. It could take up to a year to get a decent sized plant. Cuttings root and grow more quickly than leaf propagations (plus they start out bigger).

Budding Propagation

It’s finally time for Aloe to shine!

Ever notice how some plants just grow more of themselves? Sempervivum are famous for it – that’s why they’re commonly called Hens and Chicks. Haworthia do it too, as do Sansevieria. It’s a very common kind of propagation and not at all unique to succulents. It’s how grass gets around, too.

The baby plants are called “buds” or “pups” or “offshoots”. They usually grow out of the base of the mother plant and share a connected root system.

Propagating plants that reproduce through budding is a double-edged sword – on one hand, you literally don’t have to do anything at all, but on the other hand you have to wait for the plant to propagate on its own.

Being at the whim of your plants isn’t so bad, though. Keep them happy and healthy and buds should grow constantly throughout their growing season. Removing and replanting them is very similar to the process of take a cutting:

  1. First, you have to wait until they’re big enough to remove. It varies from species to species, but once they’re at least an inch or two in diameter (or several inches tall for the vertical variety of succulents).
  2. Find where the pup connects to the parent. It is probably either at the base of the primary stem or connected through a thick root called a “runner”. It’s okay to unpot the plant while you’re propagating it.
  3. Using the same technique we used for cutting propagations, make a clean cut where the bud meets the mother plant. If they share roots, give a generous portion to the baby when separating them. The mother plant can make more easily.
  4. Move the bud directly into a new pot, no need to wait for callusing this time. Still, you shouldn’t water it for a few days while it heals over.

Budding is also the way to propagate succulents like cacti, so you can use this method on them too!

Inevitably, you’ll have way too many plants – especially if you are rehoming every bud that comes along. These cute little succulents make great gifts and have the added bonus of subtly converting friends to hobby. You can get some gift ideas by looking at this article about succulent planters. You can find a style your friends or family are sure to love.

ALSO READ:

 


 

 We hope you got some pointers on how to keep your plant family healthy! If you did, please take a moment to SHARE on Facebook or PIN US on Pinterest with the social buttons below!

Enjoyed learning about Propagating Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook titled The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully! With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll you have greater success with propagating! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Do you have any propagation tips or tricks? Share them with us in the comments below!

Thanks for reading!

If you enjoyed reading our blog about succulent propagation check out our other articles! Enhance your succulent knowledge with 6 Best Indoor Succulents, 6 Edible Succulents to Excite Your Taste Buds, or Household Items You Can use as Succulent Planters.

>