Aloe Aristata— All About The Torch Aloe Plant

Aloe aristata the torch plant

How about a succulent that produces juice used as bathing gel which results in a refreshing tonic effect? Well, that’s right! The Pondo people wash their bodies using Aloe aristata juice mixed with water because of it’s refreshing effect.

If you’ve been around the aloe genus block, you’re quite aware that their species have lots of uses and benefits. This is also true for the torch plant. In addition to being showy, evergreen and attractive, aloe aristata is also used for its wound healing prowess among other uses.

No need for over the counter healing gels and ointments when you have aloe gel to work with.

Just like the classic aloe vera, the torch aloe plant is an easy care plant that will literally thrive on neglect. Whether you want to grow it indoors or outdoors, aloe aristata is one succulent that will add spice to your existing collection.

Aloe aristata succulent plant with blue and green hues
@ankigold

The Aloe Aristata Plant

Although most gardeners know it by its synonym, “Aloe aristata,” the correct name of the torch plant is Aristaloe aristata. It hails from the aloe genus though its appearance leans more on the haworthia genus. Just like the China aster plant, the torch plant is the only species in the genus Aristaloe.  Its common names include Guinea-fowl aloe, lace aloe, torch plant and torch aloe.

Native to the grasslands of Lesotho and South Africa, the torch plant is a hardy succulent well adapted to living in arid areas. It’s quite rare to find these plants in the wild due to regular harvesting by the locals. This African succulent is a popular living room companion in many households and gardens all over the world.

Characteristics of the Torch Plant

Short and stemless, Aloe aristata is an attractive, slow growing succulent reaching only to a height of 12 inches. It’s an evergreen perennial growing in closely knit rosettes.

The leaves are fleshy, stubby and lance-shaped, randomly arrayed with white spots giving it a striking resemblance with its relatives in genus Haworthia. The torch plant leaves are triangular-like with a spiny tip and have a serrated margin covered with white teeth.

Still on the leaves, they are pale green when grown in shade and turn dark green when exposed to full sun. Aloe aristata stores water in its long, lanceolate leaves allowing it to cheat long periods of drought.

This plant of merit will bloom in late winter or summer producing a tall inflorescence bearing orange-red, cylindrical flowers that are nectar-rich thus attracting birds and bees. The flowers are scentless and have a short lifespan. Be that as it may, Aloe aristata will bloom every year without fail.

Its well-formed rosettes and conspicuous flowers makes it a perfect fit for containers or a complement to succulent gardens.

 

Aloe aristata succulent plant
@flowersbybia

How to Take Care of Aloe Aristata Succulents

This jungle succulent isn’t demanding when it comes to growing it. A brown thumb or a newbie gardener will find growing a torch plant extremely blissful. Careful though, it might collapse on you if denied ideal growing conditions.

Read on to find out how to grow healthy torch plants.

What is the ideal temperature for the torch plant?

Aloe aristata will do well in room temperature but won’t be very happy if exposed to freeze cold temperatures. If you’re living in a region that’s usually cold throughout the year, it’ll be wise to have your torch plant in a pot so that you can bring it indoors when winter strikes.

This succulent can grow in dry air and really doesn’t care about humidity levels. To encourage blooming, let it have a winter rest at a temperature not exceeding 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

Light requirements for aloe aristata

The torch plant is an avid sun lover and would do well in bright sunlight for a minimum of four hours a day. You want to place it in a west or south facing window to receive adequate light if you’re growing it indoors.

When growing outdoors, plant it in a spot where it will receive enough sunlight every day. Avoid strong sun especially during summer as this might lead to stressing. Aloe aristata can do well in partial shades but be careful not to overdo it. Insufficient light will cause your plants to etiolate.

Succulent aloe aristata plant
@rootsandrope

Soil and fertilizing aloe aristata

If you want your Aloe aristata to be around for a longer period, then be careful with the type of planting soil in use. Nothing leads succulents to an early grave than damp soil. Excessive moisture is a nightmare to any succulent as it leads to root and stem rot.

The solution?

Use commercial cacti potting mix. It’s specially formulated to emulate well-draining desert soils ensuring your plants don’t sit on wet soil.

You can get commercial cacti soil online without breaking the bank. If you don’t mind some dirt on your hands, then you can make your own cacti mix right at home. Simply mix garden soil with equal parts of sand or perlite and you’re good to go!

Like most succulents, the torch plant doesn’t necessarily need fertilizer to grow into a healthy plant. To accelerate growth and blooming, feed it every two weeks with a dilute liquid fertilizer during its growing season. Avoid feeding it during winter.

Hoffman 10410 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 10 Quarts
Miracle-Gro Indoor Plant Food, 8-Ounce (Plant Fertilizer) (2...
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Hoffman 10410 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 10 Quarts
Miracle-Gro Indoor Plant Food, 8-Ounce (Plant Fertilizer) (2...
-

Last update on 2021-10-07 / Amazon

Watering the Torch Plant— Aloe Aristata

This South African survivor has been cheating drought spells for ages. Its thick, fleshy, and lanceolate leaves store water for use in tough times. With such an adaptation, it’s quite dangerous to feed it excess water as it doesn’t need it. This will lead to the water sitting in the soil for a long time –a disaster for the torch plant roots.

Depending on the environmental climate in your area, water your Aloe aristata 2 to 4 times in a month. Allow the soil to completely dry out in between watering. Cut back on watering during winter and other cool seasons.

The recommended way to water your torch plant is from the bottom. Watering from the top will get the tight rosette wet leading to leaf rot.

Aloe aristata succulent plant in ceramic planter
@theplantstudent

How to propagate the torch plant succulent

Getting more plants from Aloe Aristata is a painless process. Propagation is by pups or offsets which grow at the base attached to the mother plant by a stolon. This is best done in summer for optimum growth of the offsets.

To encourage offsets growth in your plant, avoid placing it in dark spaces as the torch plant will readily produce offsets when showered with adequate light.

To propagate by offsets, look for mature pups at the base of the plant. This can be evidenced by small roots or already formed leaf rosettes on the pups. Gently separate them from the mother plant using a sharp knife or scissors being careful not to injure the delicate roots.

Plant the offsets in well-draining soil, preferably commercial cacti mix. Slightly moisten the soil and don’t water it for two to three weeks until the pups start showing signs of growth. Set the pups in bright light away from direct sunlight for healthy, dark-green leaves formation.

Repotting aloe aristata succulent

Move the torch plant to pots one size bigger during spring. It’s recommended to use shallow pots while repotting. Avoid extra-large pots as the aristata plant will easily produce offsets when it’s root bound.

While repotting, avoid burying leaves close to the soil as this encourages plant rot. Only use cacti potting mix to repot your torch plant.

Aloe Aristata Pests & Common Problems

Aloe aristata succulent plant
@hayven.handmade

Pests

Apart from stubborn mealy bugs and scale insects, the torch plant doesn’t suffer much pest infestations. You can get rid of mealy bugs by washing them off with a jet of water or better still, using 70% isopropyl alcohol or neem oil to combat them. As for scale insects, you can physically remove them or use insecticides to control them.

Yellow and wilting leaves

If you notice the leaves of your aloe aristata turning yellow, then you are overwatering your plants. This is usually accompanied by stem rot and it’s an early grave for your plants. If you detect it early, stop watering immediately and inspect the plant while removing any rotten parts.

Wilting, on the other hand, is caused by plants not getting enough water during summer. Investigate early signs of wilting and continue watering your plant accordingly. Remember, succulents need more water during hot seasons due to increased transpiration.

Where to buy the torch plant succulent?

Aloe aristata is a popular succulent and is readily available in plant nurseries, home garden centers as well as grocery stores. If that doesn’t prove successful, then try online stores like SucculentBox, Etsy, Amazon and Mountain Crest Gardens.

 

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Thanks for reading with us and happy planting!

Who is the Queen of the Night Succulent?

Queen of The Night Succulent

Queen of the night cactus is a darling. Not just among succulents’ enthusiasts; but ages long cultures view it in a revering light.

Is it because of the name “queen” in it?

Or was the name as result of the elevation in the first place?

Wonder no more because you’re about to get all the juice right below. But only if you keep reading.

queen of the night cactus
@jerjer76

Epiphyllum Oxypetalum

Queen of the night cactus is a member of the Cactaceae family, just like any other cactus. Further on, it is among the 19 species that make up the Epiphyllum genus, this particular one (Epiphyllum oxypetalum) being the most popular.

On occasions, the epiphyllum oxypetalum plant has been referred to as night-blooming cereus though has no relation to the night-blooming species in the Cereeae tribe.

Besides queen of the night, this species is also referred to as the Dutchman’s pipe cactus. There is a lot more names given to this plant in different cultures as you’ll get to see in a few.

queen of the night cactus
@leobeira

Description & Characteristics of the Queen of the Night Cactus

Epyphyllum oxypetalum has a varied stem growth. The stems don’t just grow erect from the ground, but can be sprawling, ascending or scandent and also bear numerous branches.

Primary stems have woody bases, a cylindrical shape up to a height of 6m and are laterally flat. Meanwhile, secondary stems are flat with oval tapering ends.

Flowers are large, white in color and fragrant – only that you’ll have to check them out during the night if you want enjoy them.

What is the origin of the Queen of the Night cactus plant?

The epiphyllum oxypetalum species like many other succulent plants and cactus plants has been found to be a native of southern Mexico and parts of south and central America.

The Queen of the Night cactus plant is quite a popular plant owing to its extensive cultivation. This has definitely bolstered its population and hence the designation “Least Concern” by the IUCN.

ALSO READ:

queen of the night cactus
@ozonenursery

Interesting facts about the Queen of the Night

Queen of the night cactus isn’t just another cutie pie succulent. In some cultures, it has been assigned particular notions that are reflected in the names it’s identified as.

  • The Japanese refer to it as Gekka Bijin meaning beauty under the moon.
  • In Indonesia it’s a flower of triumph (Wijaya Kusuma)
  • In Sri Lanka it’s a flower from heaven (Kadupul)
  • Indians have named it Brahma Kamalam, after the Hindu god of creation lord Brahma. According to their beliefs, your wishes will be fulfilled if you offer your petitions to God when the plant’s flower is blooming.

The Chinese on the other hand use it figuratively to refer to someone who scores a sudden but short-lived moment of success – just like the flower of this plant that blooms at night but can’t live to see the next dusk.

queen of the night cactus
@chorynurticehandayani

How to Care for Queen of the Night Cactus Plants— the Right Way

Being a succulent, this is an easy peasy plant to take care of in your garden of succulents and cacti. You know, like being light-handed on some care aspects that should otherwise be thorough and so on.

For a robust and low maintenance cactus of this kind, here are the minimum specifics to keep in mind for the epiphyllum oxypetalum plant.

Should you keep your Queen of the Night hydrated?

The queen of the night cactus hates water just as any succulent out there. So, be sure to heed this if you want it to thrive. If you didn’t know already, succulents and cacti do not need as much water as other plants in order to thrive.

If anything they need less water and should only be watered when fully dried out. (Drainage holes and breathable pots/planters are what allows these types of plants to thrive best).

From spring all the way to fall, the watering frequency should be once every 2 weeks. Keep a lookout if the soil is still damp or moist, if it is, stretch out the watering process another couple days or 1 more week to ensure there will be no rotting.

Come winter, cut back on watering to allow the top soil to dry up completely. That means you’ll be watering once every 4-6 weeks.

queen of the night cactus
@glennflavinhh

What are the ideal temperatures for the Queen of the Night cactus?

This particular cactus thrives in Zone 10 and 11. (If you’d like to know what zone your other plants are use this plant hardiness tool to find out). So, you’ll have to bring them inside during winter if you’re based in zones where minimum average temperatures can hit 35°F during winter.

Temperatures between 50°F and 90°F are ideal for this kind of cactus.

Proper soil and fertilization for Queen of the Night Cacti

Be sure to use a well-draining soil mix for your queen of the night cactus. That way you’re sure its roots are safe from rot that comes by as a result of excessive moisture due to the soil holding water for too long.

Use a commercial cactus and succulent mix or create your own by mixing regular potting soil with pumice/perlite and coarse sand.

Apply a low nitrogen fertilizer once a month from spring to fall. Alternatively, you can use a natural fertilizer (compost).

queen of the night cactus
@glennflavinhh

Sunlight recommendations for your Queen of the Night Cactus

Direct sunlight and this cactus don’t get along well. Remember in the natural habitat it grows on other plants shielding itself against direct rays in their shade. So, if your region is ideal, planting them outside should be under bigger plants.

Placing this cactus in an environment where it’s closely matched to its natural habitat is ideal.

But for indoors, a couple of hours by a window will go a long way.

Propagating the Queen of the Night Cactus

Before we begin, if you haven’t checked out our article on propagating succulents successfully, we highly recommend you read it and learn the overall process behind propagation and why it works.

If you want to increase the number of your cacti quick, go with the cuttings option. Of course seeds are also an avenue but the wait is going to be a little longer.

For cuttings, make sure to make them either in summer or spring 2-3 weeks after the flowering season. Make a cutting long enough for planting and allow it sometime (a week is good) for the cut part to dry. Whatever you use should be sharp and clean to avert any infections. We highly recommend getting a handy tool like this for easy cuts, it’ll make your life so much easier.

Proceed to insert the cutting in a well-draining moist potting mix. (For organic enthusiasts and practitioners you might want to use this organic soil mix by The Next Gardener). Place the pot in a bright spot away from direct sunlight. Water every time the soil dries up until the plant is off to a start when you can now adopt the watering routine above.

Remember, less water is better than more water for these types of plants.

queen of the night cactus
@glennflavinhh

How can you Repot the Queen of the Night Cactus Safely

The epiphyllum oxypetalum plant is going to outgrow its original pot as the years go by, like anything that grows. So, repotting is a sure thing if you want to keep your plant beaming.

Again, give it some time after the flowering season, usually a month is enough. Fill the bottom of the new pot with gravel to aid drainage.

Now carefully pull out the plant by its root ball from its current pot and place it in the above pot. Make sure it isn’t stuck. Otherwise, loosen up the soil mix by passing a gardening knife or garden shovel through it in a back and forth motion along the edges of the pot. Fill up the pot with a fresh mix and give it a week before watering. Allow the soil to dry for a month before doing it again after which you can proceed with the usual frequency above.

Pests & Problems to Look Out for your Queen of the Night

Queen of the night cactus is vulnerable to attacks from common pests that munch other cacti and succulents. These include mealybugs, slugs, aphids and scale bugs – among a host of others. It is important to check your plants regularly for signs of these little intruders.

Apply any of the following in case you spot them:

  • Spray the epiphyllum oxypetalum plant using a combination of rubbing alcohol and water
  • Spray with the required pesticide or insecticide
  • Blow them off using a jet of water. Just be sure to keep the soil covered so as it doesn’t end up being waterlogged.

Fungal Leaf Spot

What is fungal leaf exactly? It’s like a deteriorating plant typically spotted when a plant becomes covered in black/brown patches. Not only is it not appealing but it can be a sign your plant needs more attention to overcome this.

For a severe case, it may be impossible to salvage the plant entirely and propagating a new one is the only worth while step. But in case of just a few spots, using a fungicide is a big saver. With more than 100 reviews we believe this fungicide from Souther AG will be a safe bet if you’re using method.

queen of the night cactus
@lucysompie

Uses of Queen of the Night Cactus

Besides the epiphyllum oxypetalum plant being ornamental, it can be used for the following.

  • Strengthen heart tissue
  • Alleviate heart pain
  • Calm the nervous system

Where Can I Buy A Queen of the Night Cactus?

In a lot of places.

With the Queen of the Night’s popularity, it is easy to come across a piece of it in succulents’ retailers either offline or online. This cactus being amongst the more popular cacti won’t be hard to come by when searching for it.

Offline, walk into your local nursery and grab one for yourself or pick it up from your friend’s place – with their expressed permission, of course.

Online, you have a lot of places to choose from including Amazon, Etsy, Succulent Box, Mountain Crest Garden etc.

queen of the night cactus
@glennflavinhh

Think you’ll have yourself a Queen of the Night cactus plant now? As beautiful as they are, they’re also low maintenance! Easy to care for and the right amount of neglect goes a long way, not your typical high maintenance Queen.

Did you enjoy this article but are still confused and have more questions you’d like answered? Feel free to join our exclusive group at the Succulent Plant Lounge. We have members asking questions daily and are being answered from our awesome members as well.

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Thanks for reading with us, and like always, happy planting out there!

Is Aloe Vera a Succulent? (Beginners Guide)

Is Aloe Vera a Succulent?

Being the plant enthusiast you are, the aloe vera hasn’t escaped your attention, right? Of course not!

This is just one of those plants that are easy to come across – especially for someone like you with a little bit of interest in this front. Even if you weren’t remotely looking into plants, you sure might have bumped into it at the office or a friend’s place. It’s only natural for a plant that is not only beautiful but also with a range of benefits. Definitely an asset. What do you say?

Oh, and the beloved aloe can also be eaten. Surprise surprise!

All that gritty about the awesomeness of aloe vera plant is a few paces down. For now…

Is aloe vera plant a succulent? To better answer this question, a bit of a refresher (or a primer, it depends) on succulents.

is aloe vera a succulent
Top view of aloe plant @naotemdinheirouseaimaginacao

A Recap of Succulents

Succulents are plants with fleshy leaves. These leaves are an adaptation for storing water over long periods of time. In other succulent species, it’s the stem with this adaptation and in most cases, the leaves are tiny and neede like.

And that means succulent plants can grow and survive long periods of drought relying only on the stored water for vital processes. Drier soil conditions are better for them. So natural habitats are the arid and semiarid areas. A hardy lot this is!

But deserts aren’t the only places they grow nowadays. They’re in homes and offices all around the world! Putting up their bravery in giving these spaces an extra beautiful finishing with their wide range of colors, shapes and sizes.

So, does the aloe vera plant measure up to this description?

is aloe vera a succulent
Inside of aloe vera @aloeveracrete

Aloe Vera as a Succulent

Yes, it sure does. Aloe vera plant is so much a succulent!

From the leaves to its origin, and therefore the best conditions it can thrive in, it checks all the boxes of succulent plant tendencies. The plant leaves are thick and fleshy, a perfect possession for a plant native to the largely dry Arabian Peninsula. The same dry soil conditions are evident in its other native lands in the north and south Africa.

So for a houseplant, its care is very much identical to that of a regular succulent houseplant. Nothing demanding. In fact, too much attention, especially with the water, is a quick way to kill an aloe vera plant. You must be careful watering your plant and only water when it’s needed.

Remember, neglect for succulents is actually okay!

To be safe, here’s a quick peak at how to correctly nurture an aloe vera plant to ensure a beautiful and healthy growing life.

is aloe vera a succulent
Aloe vera much sticker @turtlessoup

Moderate Watering

With the desert adaptations, too much water is the last thing an aloe vera plant will need. It already has quite an amount stashed in those leaves.

But a little addition of it at spread out periods is definitely welcome. So you’ll do well (the aloe vera plant too) if you allow the top of the soil mix to dry out between watering. That’s ideally 2-4 weeks depending on the conditions of your area.

The frequency further reduces when winter kicks in.

Well-Draining Soil Mix

This is all part of trying to steer clear of long term wetness in the roots (say hello to root rot). The potting medium should drain out quick to give those roots their peaches and cream – dryness.

So be sure to grab a commercial cacti and succulent mix that is perfect in drainage. Or create your own well-draining mix by combining measured quantities of regular potting soil, coarse sand and pumice.

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is aloe vera a succulent
Aloe vera soaking up the sun @naotemdinheirouseaimaginacao

Bright Sunlight

Aloe vera plants love the sun served bright every few hours per day. If you’re having it indoors, keep it near a south-facing window to get it’s fix of the sun. Remember to rotate the pot every 6 months to prevent stretching out or etiolated.

Outdoors, give your plant a dose of up to four hours of sunlight daily – under a shade. Please don’t have it under direct sunlight as this can greatly harm your beautiful aloe vera plant.

Room Temperature is Fine

You don’t need to worry about maintaining a particular reading. That temperature inside is just fine. No problemo!

Beware though. Super low readings are a bit of a stretch for aloe vera plants. Make a point of bringing the plant inside when winter hits. It will appreciate it and so will you. Nobody wants to water plants in the freezing winter do they? Let us know if you do, you’re a trooper!

is aloe vera a succulent
Potted aloe vera @aloeveracrete

Go Ahead and Grow Aloe Vera

Having an aloe plant is far more beneficial than just adding to your decor; although that’s a very nice thing.

Aloe vera plant possesses a myriad of health benefits making it such a valuable plant. Here’s a few that you can benefit from

  • Improves digestion
  • Joint and muscle pain reliever
  • Plays a role in healing of wounds
  • A perfect remedy for nausea
  • Cures gum disease

And so on, you name it!

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BE SURE TO ALSO READ:

is aloe vera a succulent
Aloe vera bouquet @aloeveracrete

Do you know of any other tips on maintaining an aloe vera plant or want to share photos of your own? Leave us a comment below or share your wisdom with other succulent lovers at our Facebook page, Succulent City Plant Lounge!

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Happy planting!

What Causes Succulent Rotting and How to Prevent it?

Why is My Succulent Rotting?

If you’ve taken care of a succulent for quite some time now, you know that at least every succulent enthusiast will eventually encounter rotting. It’s like a right of passage if you will. Guess you’re staring at it right now, that’s why you’re here! Don’t beat yourself up over it, it happens— trust us.

Rotting can be such a motivation- drain, especially when you’ve been doing your best to have a beaming succulent plant. Why does it happen?

Is it because of a random disease in succulents?  Pest attacks- like those dang mealy bugs?

What exactly causes succulent rotting?

why is my succulent rotting
succulent freckles @succswithoutyou

Why Your Succulent is Rotting

A succulent can end up rotting for a couple of reasons. Continue reading and we’ll outline the reasons for you!

The Cold Winter Season

The first one is the winter cold. Yes, as much as succulents are termed as hardy with a tolerance for extreme conditions, not all of them can bare the combination of frost and low temperatures. Leave them outside during the cold months and rotting is what they’ll do. Here’s our guide on How to Take Care for Succulents in the Winter.

Avoid this scenario and get yourself a grow light, like this one! Bring your succulent babies inside and keep them warm with you during the cold, winter months. Aside from this grow light, check out our article on the additional Best Grow Lights Reviewed by Succulent Lovers.

why is my succulent rotting
brittle baby @inas_eden

Overwatering Your Succulents

The second one is overwatering. The most common. If you just started planting succulents you’re probably already doing it. For the caring soul you are, watering is something high up on your list as far your plants are concerned. You do it with your all but you have to be mindful when watering your succulents.

Being the houseplants that thrive with a bit more neglect, compared to other houseplants, you need to be a bit more conservative with your watering.

That will be great for any other of your plants except succulents. Plenty of water is a sure way of killing those babies. Because as soon as rotting kicks in, the damage is done. Saving the plant is still an option but not in the way you envision.

More on that later though. In the meantime, let us help with our article When You Should Water Your Succulent.

why is my succulent rotting
stop over watering @leafyroomies

The Wrong Succulent Soil Mix

And finally, your regular potting soil. If you didn’t get this aspect right during the potting stage, then it doesn’t matter how little you water your plant. The water will still be around for periods that aren’t ideal for a succulent.

The right succulent soil mix needs to be well-draining. Your succulent stores the water it needs within its leaves, so any access water that remains in its soil is only going to become harmful for your little baby. Here’s succulent soil mix we swear by. Give it a try if you haven’t already!

Those reasons aside, how do you tell that it’s rot you’re dealing with? It’s important to be sure so as to not end up applying the wrong remedy.

Before we continue… We’re just so excited to share with you about our sponsorship with Amazon! And to celebrate, they’re offering a FREE 30-day trial of their Amazon Prime Membership… You know, the membership where you can get FREE 2-day shipping on all your succulent needs?! Click this link to learn more and sign up today!

Okay… back to succulents.

why is my succulent rotting
get yourself the right potting mix @succulent_journey

Diagnosing Rotting in Your Succulent Plant

Rotting, especially due to being overly generous with water, has unique tell-tale signs. For an overwatered succulent

Consider these as precursors to rotting.

Here’s what you’ll see when the plant is really in the red as far as rotting is concerned:

  • Dark brown to black spots appear around the stem area
  • The affected parts become swollen and acquire a black coloration.
  • If the rotting has kicked off from the roots, the plant comes off as unhealthy with droopy leaves.
why is my succulent rotting
splitting Jade leaves @the_orchid_queen

Can a Rotting Succulent Be Saved?

That depends on the extent of the rot. If it is just a few roots that had started to catch on, simply cutting them off will salvage the plant— here’s a trimming set that will come in handy! But if the rotting is present in a larger part of the root ball and the stem, it’s farewell for your succulent – well, to some extent.

Not to worry though. Thanks to the ease of propagation of succulents, you can still end up with a new plant of the same kind. To do this, only pick out the parts that aren’t affected by the rot and set them up in a well-draining soil mix.

In both severe and mild rotting attacks, be sure to keep the following in mind:

  • Use a fresh potting mix. Even if the previous was well-draining, don’t include it in propagation or repotting. That will be a zero-sum undertaking.
  • If you’re going to use the same pot, clean it thoroughly. Get another if you don’t trust your idea of thoroughness. If you’re in need of some new planters, these are adorable, but read on here for 12 stunning succulent planters that are a MUST.
  • Any rotting part is cut off, no matter how small or insignificant it may appear. Only explicitly healthy parts should be considered. That way, you eliminate the possibility of the same problem recurring.
  • The cutting tool should be clean (possibly sterilized) and sharp. Jagged parts and infections aren’t exactly needed here (or anywhere else).
  • Cut parts should be left to dry out before being inserted into any medium.
why is my succulent rotting
let’s save your babies @terracottacorner

Preventative Measure for Rotting Succulents

It will be utterly useless for you to eliminate rotting parts and propagate a new succulent plant, and still end up with the same problem. So, after separating the good from the bad, your care routine should incorporate the following to keep rotting at bay.

A Well-Draining Potting Mix

Your regular potting soil is great. But not with a succulent. That’s if you want a healthy beaming succulent plant. Long periods of wet soil won’t assure you of this.

So, grab a commercial cactus/succulent mix. Or tweak the drainage capabilities of that regular potting soil by adding sand and pumice/perlite.

why is my succulent rotting
succulent lover’s dream patio @minigardens_minsk_brest

Ideal Watering Frequency

If you’ve been too heavy-handed with watering, it’s time to go easy. Remember: too much water is the leading cause of rotting in a succulent plant.

So, how easy should you go so as not to kill your succulent?

Let the top part of the mix be your guide. This top part should be allowed to dry out completely, between watering sessions, ideally 1-2 inches down the mix.

Keep in mind the growing seasons too. Periods of growth need water (not too much of it) while in dormancy, the amount reduces considerably. That means keeping up with a uniform watering routine can still turn out to be detrimental. So, use the above guidelines during seasons like summer and spring, and cut back during winter.

Use a Clay Pot

Well, if you can help it. Clay is so much better aerated which is a major boost to the drying rate of the potting mix. This gives the succulent roots great breathing space and hence reduces the chances of rotting by a huge margin.

Get your clay pots, here. They’d also be great to try DIY painting activities with!

For any other pot type, ensure the drainage holes at the bottom are large enough to let off the water as easily as possible.

why is my succulent rotting
grow baby, grow @succulentheaven21

Obey the Succulent Hardiness Value

Very vital if you’re growing your succulents outdoors. All factors adhered to, rotting is still imminent if you’re keeping a succulent in the cold when it should be inside.

So, know your zone. Know the zone your plant is suited for. Can it brace the cold and the accompanying frost? If not, bring it inside as soon as winter kicks in.

Knowing your zone (and that of the plant) is as easy as logging on to the USDA plant hardiness zone Map and typing in the name of your area.

The main reason why your succulent will rot is too much water. But it shouldn’t be the end of your plant. Just cut up the affected parts and start over again. This time around, be sure to adopt good care routines above so that you’re not stuck into an endless loop.

ALSO READ:

why is my succulent rotting
no rotting here @succulentlovestory

Have you been through the rotting cycle of succulents and have some additional tips for us, drop a comment down below, or join our Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge, and share your thoughts there!

We have dozens of helpful guides on ensuring you become a good succulent parent you can be! Give our articles like, Can Succulents Survive in My Work Environment and Your Ultimate Guide on How to Take Care of Air Plants, a look today and get inspired!

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on The Correct Way to Water Succulents or even Succulent Drainage Requirements today!

Thanks for reading, happy planting!?

8 Most Popular Succulents from Africa

8 Popular Succulents from Africa

Let’s be honest, some plants need more care than children or pets! Maybe you just don’t have the time, patience, or green thumb to deal with a fussy plant but at the same time, you want to avoid the disapproving look from ‘mother’ when she visits and every plant has died.

Or perhaps, allergies prevent you from having fresh daisies and roses close to you, but you still want the opportunity to be a plant parent.

Well, don’t stop ‘be-leaf-ing’!

There’s a fresh fad that has hit the streets and its taking ‘succers’ by storm.

Succulents are the way and they are here to stay!

Available and affordable, succulent has set the trend as decorating staples at events, restaurants, office focal points, outdoor landscaping and even walking down the aisle on a bridal bouquet.

Here is your chance to get inspired and keep that plant alive with this list of 8 of the most popular African succulents.

Not only are these African succulents gorgeous to look at, but you won’t pull your hair out keeping them alive. Here we go!

8 popular African succulents
let’s learn about some African succulents @holistichabits

Othonna Capensis—Ruby Necklace

This distant member of the sunflower family has its roots in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. It also goes by the name “Ruby Necklace” or “Little Pickles” and is known locally as “Bobbejaankool”.

Talk about nicknames!

The Ruby Necklace, not to be mistaken by jewelry, This succulent has bean-like foliage that extends from vibrant, ruby-red stems. The succulent bean-like leaves vary in color from green to purple, depending on how much sunlight it is exposed to. The plant produces small, daisy-like flowers that may either be purple, white, or yellow, and it blooms all year round.

The Ruby Necklace’s popularity, amongst other succulents, has grown because of the adaptability of its vines for trailing and spilling. You can find it trending, like a delicious bunch of grapes, as it hangs from a ‘fruit and veg bowl’ when planted with rosette type succulents. It has also become a main feature of bridal bouquets. No matter the occasion, the Othonna Capensis‘ flexibly adjusts to fit its new home marvelously.

See 7 Fantastic Succulent Bouquets for some inspiration!

This fashionable plant not only looks attractive but is also fairly easy to maintain. It requires very little water, and only when the soil completely dries out. The flowers of the Ruby Necklace are a great attraction for pollinators, such as bees and butterflies, making it prominent as an environmental protector. You can even match your Ruby Necklace with this ruby colored pot! Maybe we should get this one for the team too, so many planters are too cute!

8 popular African succulents
radiant ruby necklace @withloveandkare

Crassula Ovata—The Jade Plant

When talking about popular succulents, no other plant is as world-renowned as the Mozambican native Jade Plant. From China to New York, this beauty can be found on the window sills of living rooms of different sizes, crossing cultures, and language barriers as a symbol of good luck. This legendary plant also goes by the names Lucky Plant, Money Plant, Silver Dollar, Money Tree, and Friendship Tree.

Apart from Mozambique, the Jade Plant still features prominently in Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal provinces of South Africa. Historians have mentioned that the Khoi and other native tribes grated and cooked the roots of this succulent, as a delicacy to be eaten with thick milk. It was also known for its medicinal value to treat nausea and diarrhea.

The scientific name Crassula Ovata perfectly describes this succulent. Crassula, which means fat or thick, denotes the fleshy nature of the species while Ovata means egg-shaped, which is a correct representation of the shape of the leaves.

The Jade Plant has many characteristics of a Bonsai tree, with a thick trunk and wide, olive-green leaves. It prospers indoors and will retain water well, producing small white or pink flowers in the right conditions.

This succulent’s association with friendship, good luck, and financial success, make it one of the most admired, no-brainer gifts for any occasion—like in this fun planter, we gifted this to one of our team members birthday’s recently too!

Learn some further tips on taking care of the Jade plant with our article here!

8 popular African succulents
jaw dropping jade @homebrewedo2

Euphorbia Milii—Crown of Thorns Plant

Hailing from the island of Madagascar on the Indian Ocean, the Euphorbia Milli behaves like the ‘femme fetale’ of the succulent world. Not only does this plant have striking, clustered flowers growing on evergreen shrubbery, but it also has long, sharp thorns all around its stems.  The yellow, white, or pink flowers grow in red bracts that resemble petals and in tropical locations, the plant flowers all year round. This pretty little thing is, however, highly poisonous!

This drought-resistant succulent, which you can buy here, is a major sun worshiper; the more exposure to the sun it gets, the more intense and longer the flowering period is. These colorful outdoor pots would look great with this pretty plant! On the contrary to its beauty, the succulent plant produces a poisonous sap that can cause irritation when it comes to contact with skin and eyes. This succulent also causes severe stomach aches, vomiting, and inflammation of the throat and mouth if ingested. If you have toddlers or curious pets, this is definitely a plant to keep at a distance.

That being said, the Crown of Thorns is legendary for being a magnificent natural barrier when planted as a low hedge, to keep out vermin and unwanted rodents. So if you are looking for a Game of Thrones challenge, how about planting a Crown of Thorns?

For even more information on the Crown of Thorns Plant, head on over to this article!

8 popular African succulents
captivating crown of thorns @bluerainier_raining

Zebra Haworthia—The Zebra Plant

How worthy is the Zebra Haworthia? Well worth it!

This eye-catching African succulent stays true to its name, the Zebra Plant. This plant can be seen bearing chunky, dark green leaves with horizontal white stripes, giving the resemblance of a zebra pattern.

Indigenous to South Africa, the Zebra Plant can go for long periods without water as the plant stores water in its thick leaves and stem. It forms in a rosette of leaves that grow between 4” and 8” tall. When it blooms, the succulent produces tubular white or pink flowers that develop from a very thin stem, called an inflorescence.

The succulent Plant has an ingrained stress detector; the plant ‘gets stressed’ and the leaves change color. Its leaves turn red after more than 6 hours of direct sunshine. You can tell if your succulent has sunburn as it will have brown marks on the surface of the leaf facing the sun. If the leaves start to turn yellow or transparent, your plant may be drowning. How unique is that? Give your zebra some shade with this succulent shade netting.

Brush up on your Zebra Plant knowledge and care tips with our article here.

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8 popular African succulents
spotZ and stripeZ on the Zebra plant @ijustwetmyplantss

Aloe Aristata—The Torch Plant

Yeah, the good old Aloe.

Aristaloe Aristata is an atypical species that is also referred to as The Torch Plant, Lace Aloe, or Guinea-Fowl Aloe. Historically, it covered a wide span of South Africa, stretching from the Northern and Eastern Cape provinces, through Lesotho, to the borders of KwaZulu-Natal province. Highly adaptable to a variety of temperatures, the Torch Plant can flourish in sandy, dry regions, cold mountain slopes, high grasslands, and forested valleys.

This African succulent, takes the shape of a perfectly formed rosette, with thick, lance-shaped leaves. The fleshy leaves are outlined with white, saw-like teeth around the edges and have a soft white spine. White bumps can be seen scattered on the fleshy leaves, giving the plant a decorative appeal.

The evergreen plant, that would look amazing in this pot, has tubular orange flowers that grow from a bloom stalk that can reach heights of 20” (50 cm). The nectar-loaded flowers are irresistible to pollinators and tend to easily attract bees, wasps, and birds.

When planted in the ground, the Torch Plant produces several offsets around its base that are easy to propagate. The compactness of the rosettes makes this succulent popular as a potted plant, as well as, absolutely adorable in a succulent garden.

Does the Torch Plant sound like a great addition to your home, read up on this article to learn further care tips!

8 popular African succulents
totally torch @gwyn.blath

Kalanchoe Tomentosa—The Panda Plant

The Kalanchoe Tomentosa is commonly known as the Panda Plant, Chocolate Soldier, Pussy Ears, or Plush Plant and it originates from Madagascar. The succulent has oval-shaped leaves that resemble the ears of a rabbit or a cat, thus the name Pussy Ears.

The leaves are usually greyish-green in color and are covered all over in tiny hair-like structures that give the leaves a furry look and feel, click here to buy your own from Amazon! Brown freckles decorate the edges of the leaves and margins while the thick stem enables the plant to grow up to approximately 1.5 ft. tall!

This hairy house plant requires long intervals between watering. It grows well at room temperature with medium to bright lighting. There have been rare sightings of small, yellow-green flowers sprouting on the tips of branches, but it’s possible! For a super cute planter for the Panda Plant, we think you’ll enjoy this one, or maybe your friend will appreciate it as a gift! Do you know someone who likes pandas?

This African succulent has earned its’ popularity as event decor, must-have when creating stunning floral arrangements for guest tables.

A word of caution though; if you are interested in being a Panda Plant parent, they ARE known to be toxic to cats and dogs.

For additional tips on taking care of the Panda Plant, head over to this article.

8 popular African succulents
proud panda plant @succulustbalcony

Sansevieria Trifasciata—The Snake Plant

The Sansevieria trifasciata is one of the most unique species of plants that tracks its heritage between tropical West Africa, Nigeria, and the Congo. This wild-looking plant also goes by the alias The Snake Plant or Mother-in-law’s Tongue mainly due to the shape of its sharp leaf margins. Either way, it makes you a little bit cautious but that couldn’t be further from the truth.

The slithering Snake Plant has vertical wide thick leaves growing from a rosette and reaching to the sky like flames of a roaring campfire. The leaves change color ranging between dark green, light green, white, and cream, and in optimal conditions, these plants can easily reach a height of up to 2 meters.

This tenacious African succulent can tolerate neglect, abuse, and most unsuitable growing conditions. It is content when placed in direct sunlight and it can go for more than 6 weeks without water. In fact, the more you turn your back on them, the better they do!

In spite of its crazy appearance, this succulent’s popularity has risen, as more and more people discover the health benefits associated with this plant. NASA was trying to find a way to purify the air in space stations and they approved the Snake Plant as an outstanding air purifier.  Studies confirmed that the succulent removes toxins, such as formaldehyde found in cleaning products, tissues as well as personal care products. Place this plant in the bathroom and watch it thrive in the steam and low light, all the while, cleaning the air! Check out our preferred super cool planter that’ll look great in any bedroom or bathroom.

Unlike other plants, this succulent continues converting carbon dioxide into oxygen all through the night.  This special characteristic can allow you to live with a couple of Snake Plants, in a completely air sealed room with no air flow, for a significant amount of time. It is truly a plant you can count on!

On the popularity poll, the Snake Plant blows it out of the water. Aesthetically pleasing, with very little maintenance required and the ability to purify the air, these succulents from Africa have been recommended in large numbers to fill up factories, schools, offices, and homes.

Learn everything else there is know about the Snake Plant in our article here!

8 popular African succulents
indoor snake plants @house_plant_community

There you have it, 8 African succulents that are sure to escalate your patio, garden, home, or office from drab to fab!

Excited to purchase your first succulent? We have great news! We just partnered with Amazon… And to celebrate, they’re offering a FREE 30-day trial of their Amazon Prime Membership! Get free 2-day shipping on all your new succulent gear! Click this link to learn more and sign up today. We have 2 planters and plus some soil for our new office succulents coming in, we can’t wait!

Want to learn more about the wonderful world of succulents? Check out our articles on 8 Rare Succulents Worth Exploring or the ever-informative Why is My Succulent Rotting?

If you liked this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers in the world asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Happy planting, my friends!