Is Aloe Vera a Succulent? (Beginners Guide)

Being the plant enthusiast you are, the aloe vera hasn’t escaped your attention, right? Of course not!

This is just one of those plants that are easy to come across – especially for someone like you with a little bit of interest in this front. Even if you weren’t remotely looking into plants, you sure might have bumped into it at the office or a friend’s place. It’s only natural for a plant that is not only beautiful but also with a range of benefits. Definitely an asset. What do you say?

Oh, and the beloved aloe can also be eaten. Surprise surprise!

All that gritty about the awesomeness of aloe vera plant is a few paces down. For now…

Is aloe vera plant a succulent? To better answer this question, a bit of a refresher (or a primer, it depends) on succulents.

is aloe vera a succulent
Top view of aloe plant @naotemdinheirouseaimaginacao

A Recap of Succulents

Succulents are plants with fleshy leaves. These leaves are an adaptation for storing water over long periods of time. In other succulent species, it’s the stem with this adaptation and in most cases, the leaves are tiny and neede like.

And that means succulent plants can grow and survive long periods of drought relying only on the stored water for vital processes. Drier soil conditions are better for them. So natural habitats are the arid and semiarid areas. A hardy lot this is!

But deserts aren’t the only places they grow nowadays. They’re in homes and offices all around the world! Putting up their bravery in giving these spaces an extra beautiful finishing with their wide range of colors, shapes and sizes.

So, does the aloe vera plant measure up to this description?

is aloe vera a succulent
Inside of aloe vera @aloeveracrete

Aloe Vera as a Succulent

Yes, it sure does. Aloe vera plant is so much a succulent!

From the leaves to its origin, and therefore the best conditions it can thrive in, it checks all the boxes of succulent plant tendencies. The plant leaves are thick and fleshy, a perfect possession for a plant native to the largely dry Arabian Peninsula. The same dry soil conditions are evident in its other native lands in the north and south Africa.

So for a houseplant, its care is very much identical to that of a regular succulent houseplant. Nothing demanding. In fact, too much attention, especially with the water, is a quick way to kill an aloe vera plant. You must be careful watering your plant and only water when it’s needed.

Remember, neglect for succulents is actually okay!

To be safe, here’s a quick peak at how to correctly nurture an aloe vera plant to ensure a beautiful and healthy growing life.

is aloe vera a succulent
Aloe vera much sticker @turtlessoup

Moderate Watering

With the desert adaptations, too much water is the last thing an aloe vera plant will need. It already has quite an amount stashed in those leaves.

But a little addition of it at spread out periods is definitely welcome. So you’ll do well (the aloe vera plant too) if you allow the top of the soil mix to dry out between watering. That’s ideally 2-4 weeks depending on the conditions of your area.

The frequency further reduces when winter kicks in.

Well-Draining Soil Mix

This is all part of trying to steer clear of long term wetness in the roots (say hello to root rot). The potting medium should drain out quick to give those roots their peaches and cream – dryness.

So be sure to grab a commercial cacti and succulent mix that is perfect in drainage. Or create your own well-draining mix by combining measured quantities of regular potting soil, coarse sand and pumice.

is aloe vera a succulent
Aloe vera soaking up the sun @naotemdinheirouseaimaginacao

Bright Sunlight

Aloe vera plants love the sun served bright every few hours per day. If you’re having it indoors, keep it near a south-facing window to get it’s fix of the sun. Remember to rotate the pot every 6 months to prevent stretching out or etiolated.

Outdoors, give your plant a dose of up to four hours of sunlight daily – under a shade. Please don’t have it under direct sunlight as this can greatly harm your beautiful aloe vera plant.

Room Temperature is Fine

You don’t need to worry about maintaining a particular reading. That temperature inside is just fine. No problemo!

Beware though. Super low readings are a bit of a stretch for aloe vera plants. Make a point of bringing the plant inside when winter hits. It will appreciate it and so will you. Nobody wants to water plants in the freezing winter do they? Let us know if you do, you’re a trooper!

is aloe vera a succulent
Potted aloe vera @aloeveracrete

Go Ahead and Grow Aloe Vera

Having an aloe plant is far more beneficial than just adding to your decor; although that’s a very nice thing.

Aloe vera plant possesses a myriad of health benefits making it such a valuable plant. Here’s a few that you can benefit from

  • Improves digestion
  • Joint and muscle pain reliever
  • Plays a role in healing of wounds
  • A perfect remedy for nausea
  • Cures gum disease

And so on, you name it!

BE SURE TO ALSO READ:

is aloe vera a succulent
Aloe vera bouquet @aloeveracrete

Do you know of any other tips on maintaining an aloe vera plant or want to share photos of your own? Leave us a comment below or share your wisdom with other succulent lovers at our Facebook page, Succulent City Plant Lounge!

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Happy planting!

Sedum Morganianum— the Burros Tail Succulent Plant

You’ll agree with me that in the recent years the popularity of succulents has grown in leaps and bounds. These little chaps are seen in almost everything, from hanging planters like the image below to boutonnieres. The succulent fandom is not only sweeping the internet, but also botanical gardens, home décor stores, and plant nurseries.

They’re not only idiosyncratic, cute little plants trending in gardens, but also being used as wedding and home décor nuggets.

The wide plethora of these unique plants leaves a succulent newbie literally spoilt for choice. From the “living pebbles” to the stoic saguaro cacti, succulents are one of the most diverse plant groups.

What if I introduced you to the world of the most sought-after and versatile succulents of our age? Ladies and gentlemen, help me welcome: Mr. Burro’s tail.

Hanging succulent planters
Hanging Succulent Planters @sassandbelle

Sedum Morganianum

The burro’s tail is a descendant of the genus Sedum, hailing from the Crassulaceae family. The scientists saw it fit to name it Sedum morganianum. It’s popularly known as the burro’s tail, horse’s tail, lamb’s tail or donkey’s tail. Burro’s tail was thus named because of its pendulous stems and overlapping leaves that resemble an animal’s tail.

This perennial succulent is native to southern Mexico and Honduras. Sedum morganianum has been cultivated since 1935, however, it’s true origin was discovered in 2008 by Mexican botanists in Tenampa, Veracruz. Best used as an indoor hanging plant, burro’s tail is extensively grown as a house plant in Northern America.

Sedum morganianum is an award-winning, ever-green, easy-to-grow succulent with trailing stems arising from the base that may grow up to 3 feet long or more. The burro’s tail scooped the Royal Horticultural Society’s award of Garden Merit in 1993 – even before it’s native origin was discovered!

This attractive succulent has long trailing stems completely covered by thick, lance-shaped leaves that are blue-green in color. Burro’s tail is best grown in suspended pots or containers so that the stems can freely cascade downwards.

Though rare, sedum morganianum produces small, unscented, star-shaped flowers that are pink, red, or lavender in color during spring and summer.

This succulent, mostly thought to be a cactus, has brittle stems with loosely attached leaves that fall off at the gentlest touch. Due to its delicate nature, it’s advisable to keep it away from disturbances.

Sedum morganianum is sometimes confused with the Myrtle Spurge or the Creeping Spurge which is at times erroneously referred to as Donkey’s Tail plant. Myrtle Spurge is a highly poisonous plant that should be handled very cautiously.

The burro’s tail provides an intriguing texture as a houseplant or captivating green exterior in outdoors and landscapes.

Sedum morganianum burros tail
Burro’s Tail @succsgalore

What Makes the Burro’s Tail so Popular?

  • It’s trailing stems covered by fleshy, blue-green leaves overhanging a pot displays a one-of-a-kind indoor aesthetic.
  • The succulent is easy to grow with very little care needed.
  • Simple propagation technique.
  • One can grow it as a houseplant or a garden plant.
  • Sedum morganianum can be grown in a small pot as it grows vertically downwards hence little space is needed.
  • It is pet and toddler friendly.
  • It does not need a lot of water to grow.

How to Take Care of Burro’s Tail Succulent

The burro’s tail is an easy-care succulent, suiting the neglectful plant care lover or the novice gardener. Whether grown out on the garden or as an indoor plant, growing a burro’s tail is quite a snap.

The following conditions are ideal for a healthy Sedum morganianum.

Lighting for Burro’s Tail

These succulents love bright sunlight, either directly or partially. A minimum of four hours is recommended. Avoid setting them up in the very hot sun as the leaves bleach out and turn yellowish instead of the original blue-green color.

Insufficient light will cause the stem to have longer internodes thus lack of leaf compaction giving it a skimpy tail.

When you grow it indoors, place it on a sunny window to ensure absorption of maximum light. Outdoor burros should be shielded from the very hot sun during the growing season to protect them from leaf color bleaching and cringing.

Ideal Climate for Burro’s Tails

In a tropical climate, the burro’s tail can stay outdoors throughout the year. Pull them indoors during freezing winter as they can’t stand it.

Sedum morganianum will grow well in room temperatures during the growing season. Ideal winter temperatures should be anywhere between 50 and 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Burros tail sedum morganianum
Sedum Morganianum @houseplantclub

Watering Burro’s Tail Succulent Plant

The burro’s tail is a succulent, which means it stores water mostly in its leaves. These plants use the stored water for its metabolic processes. They can use this water for quite some time. Therefore, the easiest way to kill a succulent would be overwatering it. Pumping a lot of water on succulents makes it more susceptible to root rot.

Use a watering tool like this to have better control of the amount of water you use.

The best way of ensuring safe watering of the burro’s tail is by using the “soak and dry” method. This is making sure the soil dries out completely in between watering.

Give it a generous, thorough watering once in two weeks and every week while in its growing season. Reduce watering during winter as these plants are inactive and don’t grow a lot.

A sure-fire way of knowing when next to water your sedum morganianum is by investigating the leaves. Once the leaves begin to shriven, then it needs a drink – a thorough one.

Best Soil for Sedum Morganianum

Like most succulents, the burro’s tail thrives on well-drained soil specific to cacti and succulents. You can create your own well-draining soil mixture by augmenting regular soil with equal parts of pumice or perlite.

Never use pure garden soil on succulents. They hate soaked soil and it is the major cause of root rot. Instead, use grainy soil or mixed garden soil because it’s well-draining and never holds water in. Here’s a great grainy and mixed bag of soil from Bonsai Jack that is highly rated.

To add a little bit of spice to your sedum morganianum, you can add worm castings to the soil. Burro’s tail fertilizer is really not necessary, but you can feed it twice or thrice only during its growing season. A weak solution of cactus fertilizer will get the job done.

Feeding it once a month is enough and during winter, don’t feed at all. Sedum morganianum doesn’t need any fertilizer during winter because it’s inactive. For a more in-depth guide read our article: “Best Soil for Succulents”.

Propagating Burro’s Tails

Propagating the burro’s tail is a very facile exercise. The plant can be propagated from stem or leaf cuttings. Propagating from leaves is the easiest. Simply pluck a few leaves from the burro’s tail stem and place them in moist soil.

After a few days, the propagated leaves will start to sprout. Once the baby burro’s tails are half an inch, you can transplant them in their own individual pots.

The stem propagation is also quite straight forward. Cut your desired stem-length. Remove the leaves a few inches from the bottom. leave the stem-cutting to dry for one week until it calluses.

Slightly moisten the soil and then plant the cutting. While planting, pin down your plant deep in the soil to avoid pulling off once it becomes heavy. The most important nutrient needed to grow sedum morganianum is lots of sunlight, therefore, place the new propagates near a window.

If you don’t have much experience with propagating succulents or plants in general, be sure to check our in-depth guide on how to propagate succulents successfully.

Repotting Burro’s Tail Succulent Plants

Repotting can always be done if the burro’s tail overgrows its pot or when the pot becomes too old to support the plant. Choose a pot with draining holes to keep your plants dry and easily breathing. We recommend using terra-cotta pots like the ones below as they help with water retention.

Before repotting, ensure the soil is dry. Gently remove the plant from the current pot. Identify the rotted roots and get rid of them together with the old soil. In case of any cuts on the plant, treat with fungicides. Put the plant in a new pot and cover with well-draining soil. Let the plant remain dry for a week. Slowly begin watering it lightly to prevent root rot.

It is not advisable to repot mature plants severally because of the brittle nature of the plant. Too much handling of the burro’s tail results in plant damage and loss of leaves as they’re very delicate.

Read more with our article: “The Art of Repotting Succulents – the Right Way”.

Burro’s Tails Pests & Problems

Pests

The burro’s tail does not get attacked by a wide range of insects. The most common pests associated with burro’s tail is mealy bugs and aphids. You can hose them off with water or spray with a mixture of 1/5 rubbing alcohol to 4/5 water. If that fails to work, go for Neem oil which is an organic pest control alternative that is simple yet effective.

Our Pick
12/01/2020 12:36 am UTC

Root rot

Only caused by two things; overwatering or poor draining soil. Rotting may also graduate to the stem and crown. In case you notice such, collect the healthy leaves and stem tips and get rid of the rest of the plant.

Low light issues

Insufficient light causes the burro’s tail to have longer internodes with scanty leaves attached to the stem. Prune the weak parts and move the plant to well-lit area and ensure it receives four hours of bright sunlight every day.

Dropping leaves

Not really a problem but it’s nice to know that Sedum morganianum is very brittle and just a slight brush will cause the leaves to drop. Hanging the succulent is best done in places where objects or people can’t brush against it.

Poison Concerns

As per the ASPCA, the burro’s tail does not contain any poison and it’s therefore non-toxic to humans and pets alike. Caution should be taken however, not to confuse the plant with the poisonous Creeping Spurge or Myrtle Spurge which is erroneously referred to as the donkey’s tail.

Tips for Burro’s Tails

A healthy and mature Sedum morganianum plant will yield the longest stems, growing up to 4 feet in length. To grow your burro’s tail really long, observe the following best practices.

  • Give your burro’s tail plenty of Bright sunlight. Not “sun heat.”
  • Avoid overwatering your plant. Give a thorough watering once or twice a month.
  • Keep the plant away from places where people may brush against it.
  • Burro’s tail thrives best in room temperature and doesn’t like freeze winter. Therefore, keep it warm.
  • Use well-draining soil, preferably a commercial cactus mix or your own mixture of garden soil combined with pumice or perlite.

ALSO READ:

Sedum morganianum succulent burros tail
Burro’s Tail @shaughey04

Where to Buy Burro’s Tails

Sedum morganianum is easily available in plant nurseries and home garden centers. You can also find it online in sites such as Etsy and Amazon. Read our new article about where you can buy succulents for a full in-depth how to.


There you have it, the Sedum Morganianum succulent plant, also known as the burro’s tail. Be sure to read our other articles if you liked this one. We have more specific articles in the works now, in the meantime, comment your favorite succulent and we’ll write in-depth about it!

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

The Best Succulents Box Review Guide For You

We love getting plants delivered! Our local nursery is a little slim on the succulent pickings, so plant subscription boxes, like Succulent Box, allow us to try out so many species we never would’ve gotten a chance to own. 

We’re always super excited to receive our plants in the mail, and a little nervous. Succulents are pretty hard to ship. Their leaves are delicate and fragile, so they’re easily damaged in transit. The leaves can even fall off if the succulents aren’t properly packaged and get jostled around too much!

When we got our Succulent Box in the mail, we were relieved to discover that all of our plants were ok! Thanks to the ample padding in the box, none of our succulents were damaged.

Succulents Box Review
Just look at all those packing peanuts! Our succulents could not have been safer.

Time to Unwrap!

We carefully unwrapped all of our new succulents and were really impressed with how they looked.

Succulents Box Review
Plant family photo!

Would you be able to tell that these succulents were wrapped in bubble wrap just a few minutes ago? We wouldn’t—they don’t look misshapen at all!

We loved that every succulent came with a little identification card. It’s easy to figure out which genus your succulent belongs to, but it can be pretty hard to figure out the species and variety.

We definitely would’ve known that the succulent on the left in the photo above was an Echeveria, but we might not have figured out it was a Blue Elf. So we really appreciate the fact that these ID cards were included in the subscription box!

Succulents Box Review
Care instructions and a coupon code—sweet!

We also liked that the subscription box came with care instructions. It had some really helpful tips, like acclimate your succulent plants gradually to sunlight to keep them from burning and water them less during the winter. It had almost everything someone new to succulents would need to know to take great care of their plant babies!

Now let’s take a closer look at each plant that came in the box!

What’s Inside?

Our subscription box came with four succulent plants: one Echeveria, two Sedums, and one Sempervivum.

A Succulent Box like this one with four plants only costs $20, so each succulent costs $5. Not bad, right?

We’d say this cute little Echeveria ‘Blue Elf’ is worth the price!

Succulents Box Review
Echeveria ‘Blue Elf’

And so is this Sedum ‘Firestorm’ below. The edges of its leaves turn a beautiful bright red color in the sun. You can already see that they’re starting to turn red, but we can’t wait until the colors get even more vibrant!

Succulents Box Review
Sedum ‘Firestorm’

Here’s one of the Sempervivums⁠—a beautiful Pachyphyllum plant. Look at those gorgeous fleshy green leaves!

Succulents Box Review
Sempervivum Pachyphyllum

Last but not least, here’s a closer look at the Sempervivum Calcareum.

Succulents Box Review
Sempervivum Calcareum

This succulent has a big, beautiful green rosette with a hint of maroon on the tips of its leaves! Isn’t it gorgeous?

Looks like it’s already sprouting a chick, too, so this succulent is basically two for the price of one!

Overall Consensus

Overall, we’re super happy with our Succulent Box! The plants look healthy and didn’t arrive with any kind of damage. We loved all the extra touches that the box came with, like the succulent identification cards and the care instructions. The bright blue packaging on the outside of the box was super cute too!

As you can see from the photos above, there’s a nice variety of succulents in this box. They’re pretty good size as well—the ones you’d get from a nursery wouldn’t be much bigger.

And who knows if a nursery near you would even have all of these unique succulents! We’ve personally never seen an Echeveria ‘Blue Elf’ at any of the garden centers near us.

Plus, going to the garden center is not nearly as fun as getting a subscription box in the mail. Having a succulent surprise delivered to our door and not knowing what was in it was so exciting!

 

Succulents Box Review

Full Succulents Box

Would you guys get a plant subscription box like Succulent Box? We’d definitely get one again, especially since they start at $5! We also love that their 300 varieties of succulents and air plants are organically grown in California, making them a quick- ship when ordering within the USA.

Ready to get your subscription box started? Head to this link to order yours!


Let us know your thoughts and experiences in the comments section below or share in our Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge. We’re sure our fellow succulent lovers would love to hear from you!

Have your own succulent subscription box, or planters, or any succulent- related item you’d like for us to review? Contact us to inquire, we’d love more succulents for the office!

Before your new succulent babies deliver, make sure you check out our care guides so you’re fully prepared! Check out When You Should Water Your Succulents, How to Propagate Your Succulents Successfully, and Your Ultimate Guide on How to Care for Air Plants!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Have fun and happy planting! 🌱

Aloe Aristata— All About The Torch Aloe Plant

How about a succulent that produces juice used as bathing gel which results in a refreshing tonic effect? Well, that’s right! The Pondo people wash their bodies using Aloe aristata juice mixed with water because of it’s refreshing effect.

If you’ve been around the aloe genus block, you’re quite aware that their species have lots of uses and benefits. This is also true for the torch plant. In addition to being showy, evergreen and attractive, aloe aristata is also used for its wound healing prowess among other uses.

No need for over the counter healing gels and ointments when you have aloe gel to work with.

Just like the classic aloe vera, the torch aloe plant is an easy care plant that will literally thrive on neglect. Whether you want to grow it indoors or outdoors, aloe aristata is one succulent that will add spice to your existing collection.

Aloe aristata succulent plant with blue and green hues
@ankigold

The Aloe Aristata Plant

Although most gardeners know it by its synonym, “Aloe aristata,” the correct name of the torch plant is Aristaloe aristata. It hails from the aloe genus though its appearance leans more on the haworthia genus. Just like the China aster plant, the torch plant is the only species in the genus Aristaloe.  Its common names include Guinea-fowl aloe, lace aloe, torch plant and torch aloe.

Native to the grasslands of Lesotho and South Africa, the torch plant is a hardy succulent well adapted to living in arid areas. It’s quite rare to find these plants in the wild due to regular harvesting by the locals. This African succulent is a popular living room companion in many households and gardens all over the world.

Characteristics of the Torch Plant

Short and stemless, Aloe aristata is an attractive, slow growing succulent reaching only to a height of 12 inches. It’s an evergreen perennial growing in closely knit rosettes.

The leaves are fleshy, stubby and lance-shaped, randomly arrayed with white spots giving it a striking resemblance with its relatives in genus Haworthia. The torch plant leaves are triangular-like with a spiny tip and have a serrated margin covered with white teeth.

Still on the leaves, they are pale green when grown in shade and turn dark green when exposed to full sun. Aloe aristata stores water in its long, lanceolate leaves allowing it to cheat long periods of drought.

This plant of merit will bloom in late winter or summer producing a tall inflorescence bearing orange-red, cylindrical flowers that are nectar-rich thus attracting birds and bees. The flowers are scentless and have a short lifespan. Be that as it may, Aloe aristata will bloom every year without fail.

Its well-formed rosettes and conspicuous flowers makes it a perfect fit for containers or a complement to succulent gardens.

 

Aloe aristata succulent plant
@flowersbybia

How to Take Care of Aloe Aristata Succulents

This jungle succulent isn’t demanding when it comes to growing it. A brown thumb or a newbie gardener will find growing a torch plant extremely blissful. Careful though, it might collapse on you if denied ideal growing conditions.

Read on to find out how to grow healthy torch plants.

What is the ideal temperature for the torch plant?

Aloe aristata will do well in room temperature but won’t be very happy if exposed to freeze cold temperatures. If you’re living in a region that’s usually cold throughout the year, it’ll be wise to have your torch plant in a pot so that you can bring it indoors when winter strikes.

This succulent can grow in dry air and really doesn’t care about humidity levels. To encourage blooming, let it have a winter rest at a temperature not exceeding 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

Light requirements for aloe aristata

The torch plant is an avid sun lover and would do well in bright sunlight for a minimum of four hours a day. You want to place it in a west or south facing window to receive adequate light if you’re growing it indoors.

When growing outdoors, plant it in a spot where it will receive enough sunlight every day. Avoid strong sun especially during summer as this might lead to stressing. Aloe aristata can do well in partial shades but be careful not to overdo it. Insufficient light will cause your plants to etiolate.

Succulent aloe aristata plant
@rootsandrope

Soil and fertilizing aloe aristata

If you want your Aloe aristata to be around for a longer period, then be careful with the type of planting soil in use. Nothing leads succulents to an early grave than damp soil. Excessive moisture is a nightmare to any succulent as it leads to root and stem rot.

The solution?

Use commercial cacti potting mix. It’s specially formulated to emulate well-draining desert soils ensuring your plants don’t sit on wet soil.

You can get commercial cacti soil online without breaking the bank. If you don’t mind some dirt on your hands, then you can make your own cacti mix right at home. Simply mix garden soil with equal parts of sand or perlite and you’re good to go!

Like most succulents, the torch plant doesn’t necessarily need fertilizer to grow into a healthy plant. To accelerate growth and blooming, feed it every two weeks with a dilute liquid fertilizer during its growing season. Avoid feeding it during winter.

Hoffman 10410 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 10 Quarts
Miracle-Gro Indoor Plant Food, 8-Ounce (Plant Fertilizer) (2...
Hoffman 10410 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 10 Quarts
Miracle-Gro Indoor Plant Food, 8-Ounce (Plant Fertilizer) (2...
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Hoffman 10410 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 10 Quarts
Hoffman 10410 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 10 Quarts
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Miracle-Gro Indoor Plant Food, 8-Ounce (Plant Fertilizer) (2...
Miracle-Gro Indoor Plant Food, 8-Ounce (Plant Fertilizer) (2...

Last update on 2020-11-30 / Amazon

Watering the Torch Plant— Aloe Aristata

This South African survivor has been cheating drought spells for ages. Its thick, fleshy, and lanceolate leaves store water for use in tough times. With such an adaptation, it’s quite dangerous to feed it excess water as it doesn’t need it. This will lead to the water sitting in the soil for a long time –a disaster for the torch plant roots.

Depending on the environmental climate in your area, water your Aloe aristata 2 to 4 times in a month. Allow the soil to completely dry out in between watering. Cut back on watering during winter and other cool seasons.

The recommended way to water your torch plant is from the bottom. Watering from the top will get the tight rosette wet leading to leaf rot.

Aloe aristata succulent plant in ceramic planter
@theplantstudent

How to propagate the torch plant succulent

Getting more plants from Aloe Aristata is a painless process. Propagation is by pups or offsets which grow at the base attached to the mother plant by a stolon. This is best done in summer for optimum growth of the offsets.

To encourage offsets growth in your plant, avoid placing it in dark spaces as the torch plant will readily produce offsets when showered with adequate light.

To propagate by offsets, look for mature pups at the base of the plant. This can be evidenced by small roots or already formed leaf rosettes on the pups. Gently separate them from the mother plant using a sharp knife or scissors being careful not to injure the delicate roots.

Plant the offsets in well-draining soil, preferably commercial cacti mix. Slightly moisten the soil and don’t water it for two to three weeks until the pups start showing signs of growth. Set the pups in bright light away from direct sunlight for healthy, dark-green leaves formation.

Repotting aloe aristata succulent

Move the torch plant to pots one size bigger during spring. It’s recommended to use shallow pots while repotting. Avoid extra-large pots as the aristata plant will easily produce offsets when it’s root bound.

While repotting, avoid burying leaves close to the soil as this encourages plant rot. Only use cacti potting mix to repot your torch plant.

Aloe Aristata Pests & Common Problems

Aloe aristata succulent plant
@hayven.handmade

Pests

Apart from stubborn mealy bugs and scale insects, the torch plant doesn’t suffer much pest infestations. You can get rid of mealy bugs by washing them off with a jet of water or better still, using 70% isopropyl alcohol or neem oil to combat them. As for scale insects, you can physically remove them or use insecticides to control them.

Yellow and wilting leaves

If you notice the leaves of your aloe aristata turning yellow, then you are overwatering your plants. This is usually accompanied by stem rot and it’s an early grave for your plants. If you detect it early, stop watering immediately and inspect the plant while removing any rotten parts.

Wilting, on the other hand, is caused by plants not getting enough water during summer. Investigate early signs of wilting and continue watering your plant accordingly. Remember, succulents need more water during hot seasons due to increased transpiration.

Where to buy the torch plant succulent?

Aloe aristata is a popular succulent and is readily available in plant nurseries, home garden centers as well as grocery stores. If that doesn’t prove successful, then try online stores like SucculentBox, Etsy, Amazon and Mountain Crest Gardens.

 

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If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Thanks for reading with us and happy planting!

Succulents: Popular Trends on Instagram@ #succiepotinapot

The succulent community on Instagram is known for creating fun challenges for all of us succulent lovers to join in on. Recently, the #succiepotinapot challenge has become very popular and continues to bring out the creativity in many succulents enthusiasts on Instagram.

As soon as the hashtag was created, there has been a plethora of designs that include a small pot within a larger pot which gives the illusion that the pot is actually standing upright when it really is not. From intricate designs to teeny tiny pots, it is easy to see how much the succulent community has enjoyed this challenge.

If you are someone who likes creating succulent arrangements then this challenge is perfect for you! As a participant of the #succiepotinapot challenge, Succulent City asked us to share our step by step process we used to create our design.

If you are familiar with our work on Instagram, then you may just recognize this design as well! In this article, we are to explain what you will need to create your very own #succiepotinapot that you won’t be able to resist showing off!

Check out our video on instagram before you get started. See what it looks like and get a taste of what’s to come!

Succulent pot trend

Supplies Needed

Choose your Style of Succulents Planters

To start, you will want to find two pots. One of the pots should be relatively smaller than the other to give the illusion of a pot within a pot. In this design, we used two different sized terra-cotta pots that already have a drainage hole on the bottom: the large size is 10 inches across and 6 inches deep and the small size is 4 inches across and 4 inches deep.

You may choose to use a different styled pot depending on your design aesthetic, but make sure the pots have a drainage hole on the bottom. Take a look at these minimal planters if you’re having trouble finding a planter for this project.

Last update on 2020-11-30 / Amazon

Step 1

Succulent pot trend instagram

First, fill the large pot with your choice of succulents plants and cacti plants soil mix. Then with the small pot on its side add the soil into the larger pot. Half of the small pot should be showing, and add extra soil to set it in place.

Not sure what is the best soil to use when planting succulents plants, don’t worry, we’ve written about the best soil for succulents that has gained quite the interest.

Plant your Succulents plants

Step 2

Succulent pot instagram trend

We start by adding the Senecio rowleyanus, also known as String of Pearls, which gives the illusion that the plant is hanging from a pot as if it was upright. When planting the String of Pearls, make sure to tuck the roots into the smaller pot to make it look like the plant is hanging over the small pot.

Step 3

Succulent pot trend instagram

After you have your String of Pearls in place, it is time to add succulents plants that make it look like an upright arrangement. For this design, we used three colorful succulents plants that work well with the aesthetic of this design. Check out 16 other types of succulents that work perfectly for this project!

First, we place a stunning Echeveria subsessilis towards the corner of the pot, making sure to keep the plant tucked in closely to the already planted String of Pearls. To plant the Echeveria, make sure to massage the roots if they are root bound and create a small-sized hole in the soil. Add the roots of the Echeveria into the hole and surround the succulent with extra soil.

Step 4

Succulent pot trend on instagram

Next, we added the Fenestraria aurantiaca, or Baby Toes. Again, make sure to massage the roots if the succulent is root-bound and nestle the plant close to the already planted succulents plants. Using planting tools or even gardening tweezers will help spread the roots easily.

Step 5

Succulent pot trend on instagram

Lastly, we added an Echeveria ‘Ramillette’ to tie the design together. This one is placed on the other side, rounding out the look of the small succulent pot. Here is where you can really start to see the illusion come to life.

Add your Top Dressing

The last step of the design process is to add a top dressing of your choice. This is the most important part of the design because it defines the smaller pot and creates the desired effect. In this design, we used a sandy color stone that works well with the colors of the succulents plants and terra-cotta pots.

Step 6

Succulent pot trend instagram

Place the top dressing around the edges to really highlight the smaller pot.

Time to Post

Once you are satisfied with your design, take a photo, and show off your creation by posting it onto your Instagram with the #succiepotinapot to join in on this exciting challenge!

Check out the Instagram video for reference if you haven’t already!


That’s it! The #succiepotinapot project is complete. Be sure to tag us @succulentcity so we can see what you’ve come up with. Who knows, maybe we’ll feature yours too!

Did this DIY project inspire your inner gardener? We have the perfect opportunity for you then! Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents plants, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents plants and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today! 

Want to continue enhancing your succulent knowledge? We have some additional articles that we think you may enjoy! Check out Top 5 Hanging Succulent Planters Worth Having, Are Succulents Poisonous, or Best Grow Lights Reviewed by Succulent Lovers.

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Thanks for reading, hoped this inspired you! Happy planting!?

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