Full Guide to Watering Succulents – When, How & Why

how to water succulents
How to water succulents images Succulents Box

Succulents can survive in arid regions because of their ability to store water in their roots, stems, and leaves.

For this reason, many persons tend to overlook the fact that they need to water their succulents when planted in their homes. That said, to keep your succulents blooming, it is best to water them regularly.

In this article, you will learn how to water succulents plants indoors or outdoors, as well as how you can see if you are overwatering your succulents.

How to Water Succulents Indoors

Instead of just spritzing your indoor succulents, soak them to the extent that water gushes out from the drainage holes beneath the pot. Before watering your succulents again, ensure that the soil is parched.

According to Bryce Lane, a horticulturist from North Carolina State University, check the soil after a week of watering to see if it is dry. If it is not, wait one or two more weeks. When watering indoor succulents, ensure that water does not get on top of the leaves to prevent rot.

Another thing to note about watering succulents planted indoors is that they need the most amount of water during the spring when they are still growing. You can reduce the amount of water during the summer and even more during the winter. During the winter, succulents are in dormancy and do not get plenty of light, and so, their water requirement reduces.

How to Water Succulents in Outdoor Containers

During the summer, you can place your potted succulents outdoors. Give your succulents the chance to adjust to varying temperature levels by placing them in a shaded environment before moving to a brighter area, this required to ensure your succulents are not exposed to direct sunlight.

The best kits for watering outdoor succulents are squeeze bottles and spout watering cans. Use any of these kits to pour water onto the soil until it is properly soaked—from the top of the pot to the bottom. After that, wait until the soil dries out completely before watering the succulents again.

How to Water Succulents in the Ground

Succulents such as Opuntia, Sedum, and Agave can survive harsh weather conditions, especially the fully grown ones with stronger roots. Both hardy and annual succulents need to be planted in well-drained soil. According to Lane, planting succulents in stagnant water is an exercise in futility.

Creating a 2-foot mound of organic-based compost with a mixture of PermaTill will allow your succulents to flourish even if they find themselves somewhere different from their native environment. A good soaking, good soil, and good drainage are essential for growing healthy succulents.

How Often Should I Water My Succulents?

Now that you know how to water indoor and outdoor succulents, the next question on your mind will be how often you should water your succulents? Well, to answer your question, first, note that there is no rigid watering schedule for you to follow.

The watering frequency depends on the type of succulent, the size of your pot, and the weather conditions in your area. The smaller the pot, the less moisture it can accommodate. Hence, the more frequently it needs to be watered.

A good watering frequency that most indoor succulent growers adopt is watering 14 – 21 days at the early stage. Ensure that you do not overwater your succulents to avoid rot.

You can use a tool called Succulent Tracker App (only iOS version available currently). This app are useful to remind your watering schedule, as well as to avoid under-watering and overwatering, .

Signs Your Succulent is Thirsty

Even though succulents are recommended to be dry before watering, ensure that you do not dehydrate them in the process. Once you notice any wrinkles and shriveled leaves, it is a sign that you need to water your succulents.

As the cells of your succulents try to transfer their stored moisture to other parts, they also try to accumulate more water to make up for the amount they have lost. But then, if the water is not available to replace what was lost, the cells begin to contract gradually, making the leaves that used to flourish shrivel.

Signs Your Succulent Has Been Overwatered

The danger of overwatering succulents is that it damages the cell structure, roots, and leaves.

The first and most common sign of overwatering to take note of is discoloration. Once you notice the leaves are becoming soft, translucent, and squishy, know that you have been overwatering the succulents. Unlike under-watered succulents, leaves that contract overwatered succulents leaves will be dropped.

While succulents can recover from overwatering, it is not all that easy. A great way to save overwatered succulents is to plant a new one with the cuttings to root and leaves.

1 moment for promotion: Our new eBook The Correct Way to Water Succulents is out for sale 🙂 If you want a really simple guide with many useful tips for watering succulents, this eBook is right there for you. See it now!

Signs of a Healthy Succulent

First off, plants will always tell you when they are in need of something. But sadly, not everyone knows how to read the signs.

While squishy leaves discoloration tells you that you are overwatering your succulents, shriveled leaves show that you are under-watering your succulents.

Hens and Chicks plants tend to shut down older, lower leaves as they grow. While this is a natural phenomenon that is part of the growth process, the leaves do not wither. They just become very thin, papery, and brownish. Prone these leaves to keep your succulents looking fresh.

All in all, when watering your succulents, you have to consider the soil and the environment. Follow the watering guidelines we mentioned in this article, and your succulents will keep blooming even under the most adverse conditions.

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off? Succulent Care tips

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off

It’s easy to tell when your succulent is in distress. When it starts doing things like dropping leaves left and right, you know it’s not healthy or happy. But figuring out why your succulents babies are in trouble is really hard!

There are so many factors that affect plant health. Water, sunlight, temperature, the soil you use, and even the pot you’ve put your plant in can affect its health. With so many variables, how are you supposed to care & figure out why the leaves of your succulents are dropping like flies?

That’s what we’re here to help you with today! Unfortunately, we can’t come to your house and diagnose your plant in person, but we can give you the info you need to figure out what’s wrong on your own. By the end of this post, you’ll be an expert plant doctor!

Before we get to the root of the problems in this article, Amazon is offering our Succulent City community an exclusive offer of a FREE 30-day trial of their famous Amazon Prime Membership. Click here to get your free trial started and also enjoy that free 2-day shipping! What’s better than having new succulents on your doorstep extremely fast?

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Why are my succulents leaves falling off? @mijardin.pe

Low Light Succulents

Succulents can start to drop their leaves if they’re kept in low light conditions for too long. You’ll know that your plant has this issue if it looks tall and stretched out. Sun-starved succulents will also start growing towards a light source. So if your plant seems to be growing sideways to get closer to a window, that’s another sign that lack of light is the problem.

Luckily, this issue is really easy to fix! All you have to do is put your plant someplace sunnier, or put it under a grow light like this one— and for additional grow lights we recommend, check out our article, here! But before you put it outside and expose it to the sun’s blistering rays, make sure that you acclimate it first!

Plants get sunspots / burn too!

Acclimate Your Plant for the Outdoors

To start, you should only give your plant about an hour of sunlight or artificial light each day. Anything more and you’ll risk sunburning it. You can slowly increase the length of sun exposure over a period of a few weeks until your succulent is getting around six hours of bright sunlight each day, or around 12 hours of artificial light.

Your succulents should stop dropping leaves after soaking up some much-needed sun. But unfortunately, you can’t reverse some of the damage that’s been done, like your succulent’s stretched-out appearance. You can propagate your original plant and grow brand new plants from it that won’t look stretched out. But giving your original plant more sun won’t make it look as compact as it was on the day you bought it. Bummer, right?

Check out our full article about the importance of sunlight for succulents!

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Low Light Succulents @howorthia

Overwatering Your Succulents

Overwatering can have some serious consequences for your plant! It can cause root rot, make your succulent leaves falling off, and can even cause total plant death. Yikes!

Overwatering is one of the easiest ways to kill your succulent, so it’s something you definitely want to avoid. If you notice that your succulent leaves are mushy, soggy, and falling off on the regular, you need to cool it with the watering can!

You should only water your succulent when the soil it’s planted in is completely dry to the touch. You’ll probably end up watering your succulents once every week or two.

If you tweak your watering schedule, your succulent leaves should make a full recovery in no time!

ALSO READ:

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Overwatering your succulents @momsgarden_la

Will too Much Fertilizer Hurt My Succulents?

If you put too much fertilizer on your succulent, it could actually have the opposite effect and stunt its growth! It can also cause some of its leaves to drop off, discolor the remaining leaves, and burn its root system.

If your houseplant is showing some or all these signs, it’s time to take action! If you see any white crust on the surface of the soil, grab your succulent tools and make sure you remove it all carefully. This is excess salt from the fertilizer—it can damage your plant and burn it if you leave it on there.

How to Remove Excess Fertilizer

Now, if you’re going to try to flush the excess fertilizer out of the soil by watering your succulent. Let the water drain completely, and then repeat the process once or twice to make sure there aren’t any traces of fertilizer left.

Then, make sure you remove any leaves that are damaged or dying. This will prevent your plant from using up its precious resources to try to repair damaged leaves. Your succulent will grow new leaves to replace them, so don’t worry about removing them!

If you follow these steps, we think your succulent leaves will make it! But remember in the future to only fertilize your succulents with a water-soluble fertilizer, like this one we use from Miracle-Gro, that’s been diluted to half-strength. You should only ever use diluted fertilizer on your plant babies to avoid chemical burns. You should also fertilize them sparingly—no more than once a month during their active growing season. That way they won’t get overloaded with salt or nutrients and start losing their leaves.

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Can too much fertilizer hurt my succulents @olorfulife.photography

Can Succulents Survive Extreme Temperatures?

If your succulent gets too hot, its leaves will actually start dropping off. It’s a normal response to the stress caused by heat and drought. Isn’t that weird? It seems strange, but it won’t actually hurt your plant and it’s not something to worry over too much.

Still, you should try to throw some shade cloth or a plant cover over your succulent or move it to a less sunny area of your garden to try to prevent this from happening. After all, who likes to see their succulent baby stressed?

If your plants get too cold, though, that can spell disaster. A lot of succulents can’t handle freezing temperatures, and if they’re exposed to them for too long, the cells inside their leaf tissue can freeze and burst, causing irreparable damage.

If your succulent has frozen in the cold, some of its leaves will look brown or black and kind of mushy. If the damage is really bad, the whole plant will look like it’s rotting. In that case, it’s pretty much unsalvageable. For a proper guide on how to care for succulents in the winter, dormant months, check out this article.

But if the damage has only affected a few leaves here or there, your succulent leaves will be ok. Leave the damaged leaves on your plant. When your plant grows, those leaves will fall right off on their own and be replaced by healthy ones.

For cacti-specific tips, click here to see our guide on determining if your cactus is dying.

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off?
Beautiful spiral succulents! @akadamatsuchi

Those are some of the potential causes of leaf-loss and how to treat them! Did this post help you figure out what’s going on with your succulent leaves? Let us know in the comments section below!

Learn about some further ways to ensure your succulents and cacti are as healthy as can be! Check out What to Do When My Succulent Leaves are Splitting, How to Get Rid of Mealybugs, or Repotting Succulents the Right Way.

Thanks for reading! We appreciate all of our dedicated Succulent City readers. Don’t forget, we’re on Pinterest and Instagram! Give us a follow for daily succulent content and inspiration.

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth or even The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent today!

Happy planting! ??

Succulent Soil Types

Succulent soil types-SC
Succulent Soil: IG@satori.rd

To grow succulents’ plants, you need different soil from other plants. Several variables decide the right soil for safe, beautiful plants indoors or out. Using the wrong soil form, and you will find yourself endlessly solving problems with care.

Succulents are pretty and lively, but often they can be very picky. Succulents are very selective with their soil, unlike your typical indoor vine, and that’s possibly what makes them so unique.

If you’re an old succulent veteran or a new kid on the succulent block, it will take a long way to get the preliminaries right the first time in your succulent adventures. And nothing more than the form of soil used affects growing succulents.

Succulents, these beautiful, lush, little aliens, don’t get along with the mundane, traditional soil of gardening too well. It’s overrated and a little dull, they think, at least in its pure form.

What Type Of Soil Do Succulents Need?

Succulent is a plant that mostly has dense, fleshy stems and leaves. It tends to store water as an adaptation. In other words, succulents are desert-denizens. Therefore, they have recently been tamed by their peculiar yet stunning looks to spice up the living room décor, using minimalistic planters.

These plants are native to Africa, Central America, Mexico, and some of Europe’s desert regions. They have lived all their lives in the hot and dry desert and thus have a few survival hacks to fight a desert life. Their ability to store water is one of these special adaptations.

You see, in the mountains, it rarely rains. And it pours as it does, very literally. In the subsequent weeks, succulents store this water in their leaves and stem for use until it rains again. So their roots don’t suck up water all the time for succulents since they’ve always got plenty tucked away in their leaves. 

This backs up the type of soil found in the desert. It is sandy, and the hot weather helps drain the water quickly, so with excessive water, succulents do not stay on the soil.

Not only is damp, unnecessary soil is also harmful because it can lead to root rot and a host of pests, not to mention the fungal diseases that follow wet soil.

So what kind of succulent soil is cool?

Succulent soil types-Succulent Soil should be Well-Draining-SC
Use of Pumice in soil: IG@natural.gas

Succulent Soil Should Be Well-Draining

It sure had to be at the top of the list. (We discuss this lot because of how important it is if you’ve been reading our recent articles). There is just a catastrophic mixture of succulents and moist soil.

You want to end up with soil that will drain well and rapidly while creating your succulent potting mix. The best substrate for growing succulents is loose and grainy soil.

Your Succulent Soil Needs to Have Good Aeration

It is necessary to have some room for the roots to breathe. Not only would this make the absorption of soil and nutrients easier, but it will also create a sustainable atmosphere for beneficial soil microorganisms.

Non-Compacting and Breathable Succulent Soil

Sticky and compact soil for succulents is awful. The roots dislike it because it holds moisture for long periods and makes it impossible for the plant to breathe.

Succulent soil types-Excessive Nutrients in Succulent Soil-SC
Use of Coffee Grounds in Soil

Excessive Nutrients in Succulent Soil

It sounds pretty crazy, but it’s real. Soil that contains too many nutrients, especially nitrogen, can lead to skinny, frail, and nasty plants. No one ever likes goofy-looking plants of this kind, do they?

What Makes A Good Soil For Succulents?

When we choose the best soil for succulents, our primary objective is to ensure that it has good drainage. That means we’re based on the ‘humidity’ portion of the above list.

What is soil drainage, first of all? Simply put, that’s how easily water leaves the ground. Some of the water should come out of the bottom of the pot. This should be after you water a plant, but most of it will remain in the soil. The water must either be taken up or evaporated into the air by the plant.

Succulents and cacti, as it turns out, need different soil than ordinary houseplants. Many houseplants are tropical plants. They’re originally from a region with a lot of rain and humidity in the atmosphere, presumably. Their soil is often naturally rich in nutrients.

Succulents, on the other hand, are known to be from deserts. They grow in dry regions with low rain and poor soil quality. The soil is possibly coarse and rough there and lacks nutrients.

Undoubtedly, recreating their natural situations as closely as possible is typically best. However, you might be shocked that an essential thing to copy is not the number of nutrients they receive; it’s the water amount.

Criteria For Choosing The Best Succulent Soil

In the succulent soil, let’s start by talking about what you should be looking for.

The best soil in pots for succulents can retain ample water to absorb what they need, but it also dries out quickly so that the roots do not rot.

Water from the air around them is absorbed by succulents, not by direct touch.

Sitting in moist soil continuously causes their roots to rot because they get too much water. The cells in the roots and leaves gradually break apart, allowing the plant to die.

Soil may be dried out by many environmental factors, so different soil types would be better suited for different growing areas.

In deciding what kind of soil your succulents’ need, the region where you live, as well as the place where you hold your succulents, will play a role.

Succulent soil types-How do you know if the drainage of the soil is adequate?-SC
Image by: IG@canadiansucculentguy

How Do You Know If The Drainage Of The Soil Is Adequate?

Since we understand that soil drainage is an essential aspect of succulents, we know how to make it happen. But how much drainage is sufficient?

Your succulent soil needs to be dry in a day or two after irrigation as a rule of thumb. And I’m staying dry—dry bone.

There is an easy way of measuring how dry the soil is. Stick your finger one or two inches into the soil in the cup. Not only does it feel dry but warm as well. If it feels “cool,” it is probably merely slightly damp, and you misunderstand the feeling. If the pot has been filled out by your succulent, it can be challenging to verify soil dampness and could use more space for the mass of roots. You would have to consider repotting the succulent one.

Succulent soil types-Choosing the right soil for succulents-SC
Perfect Soil mix for succulent: IG@crayons_n_spices_decor

Choosing The Right Soil For Succulents

That might sound awful, but it isn’t that difficult to select the right soil for the succulents. Only decrease the quantity of organic matter and use the effective watering techniques that we discussed.

Each succulent species seems to have its own unique needs and wants, but 99 percent of them are cool with almost the same soil. To be sure, after being placed into the new soil, watch how a plant responds and change your treatment accordingly.

It can be challenging to grow unique succulent plants, but the Fat Plants can be magical if you get the best soil type. 

A well-drained and nutrient-rich eco-system that succulents need to grow and thrive is all a succulent plant need. You will be proud of growing sound root systems, healthy fleshy green stems, and lovely colourful blooms for your succulents when you choose your soil wisely.

For selecting the right succulent soil, the Succulent City team has published this book: The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent. The book is all about how to choose the right soil for your lovely succulent, all knowledge needed from the most fundamental to expertise level information. You can buy this ebook in the SC shop. For the ultimate pack of Succulent knowledge, find it here! Thanks for visiting and we hope to see you around soon on SucculentCity.com.

Adjusting To Grow Succulents In Warmer & Drier Climates

Grow Succulents in Warmer and Drier Climates

Succulents will get burnt or dehydrated when they get exposed to hot and dry weather conditions. So, you need to know how to adjust your succulents to grow in warmer and drier climates. We will share with you some tips on how to grow succulents in a hot environment.

Adjusting to growing succulents in warmer and drier climates

Tips for Growing Succulents in Warmer and Drier Climates

If you want your succulents to thrive in a warm and dry environment, follow the tips below:

Watering Schedule

When growing your succulents in a hot and dry area, you have to adjust the watering schedule. Since there is not enough rainfall, you have to ensure your succulents do not lack water. The best method to do this is by adopting the soak and dry method.

This method involves soaking the soil and allowing the soil to dry out totally before you start watering again. For the soak and dry method to be effective, you need well-draining soil and a pot with a good drainage system.

When watering indoor succulents, ensure the water does not reach the leaf’s top. If water stays on the leaf for more than three or four days, it will lead to rot. Use a squeeze bottle or a watering can to water your indoor succulents.

For outdoor succulents, you do not have to bother about drying because there is considerably more airflow, allowing the water to dry out quickly. Keep on watering the soil around the succulents until it is soaked. That is, But remember, you have to wait until the soil is totally dried out before you water it again.

The truth is, there is no rigid watering schedule formula when it comes to dry and hot climates. Some succulents demand more water than others, so ensure you do not under-water or overwater your succulents. Generally, most succulents growers have discovered that following a 2-3 week watering schedule is enough to keep your succulents alive in the hottest climate. You can take this watering schedule as your starting guide and adjust as necessary.

What is more, you need to water your succulents in the morning during the summer. This way, the roots will be cool, and the succulents will remain fresh, even during the hottest hours of the day. Watering twice a day can also be helpful. But ensure you only water again after the soil is totally dried out.

Adjusting to growing succulents in warmer and drier climates

Shade

You will need to provide more shade for your plants as the temperature rises in the summer. There are several ways to provide more shade for succulents, and one of such is to plant large plants close to your succulents. These large plants will provide shade for your succulents. If these plants grow out of proportion, you may need to trim them, so they do not completely shield your succulents from sunlight.

You can use a shade cloth to cover your succulents in the summer. Shade cloth is particularly suitable for covering young plants that can get destroyed by exposure to direct sunlight. Shade clothes come in different densities ranging from 5% to 95%, depending on the intensity of sunlight you want to block out. The great thing about a shade cloth is that water-permeable polyester makes it, so rainfall, irrigation systems, and sprinklers can water your succulents.

If you cannot afford to get a shade cloth, a beach umbrella can come in handy. Shading your succulents is quite easier if you grow them in pots. You can easily move the pot to any appropriate location around your house to shade your plants from direct sunlight.

Planting

You need to adjust your planting during the summer. If you planted the succulents in pots, you could move them to a shady area with carts or plant trolleys during the hottest period of the year.
If you are planting new succulents in a dry and hot climate, it would be best to use larger specimens. It is because smaller plants will require more watering and will not withstand too much sunlight. On the other hand, larger plants are naturally equipped to withstand sunlight and heat and require less watering.
Generally, larger succulents can adjust to the climate and environmental changes better than smaller succulents. So, suppose you are in a region where the adverse effect of climate change is pretty drastic. In that case, we recommend that you plant larger succulents.

You have to choose whether to plant your succulents in the ground or a pot in the summer. If you decide to plant the succulents in the ground, they are less susceptible to sunburns. They remain cooler during the day because their heat will not necessarily get to their roots. On the other hand, your succulents will dry out quicker than succulents planted in the ground if you plant them in a pot. You can also move your pots as much as you want.

Types of Plants

As a succulent grower, you have to understand that not all succulents are suitable for shade.
For instance, cacti plants can survive in the heat. Some cactus can even withstand direct sunlight because of their long spines that provide shade for them and help them stay cool in hot climates. Also, the needles of cactus help them retain more water during rainfall or water them.

Agaves can also survive in a hot environment because of their deep roots, which help them absorb as much water as possible. If you are looking for plants to grow during a drought, Agaves are your best choice.

Some succulents you can shade in the summer include

  • Jade plant (Crassula)
  • Aloe Vera
  • Devil’s backbone (Pedilanthus)
  • Sansevierias
  • burrow tail (Sedum)
  • Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera)
  • night-blooming cereus (Epiphyllum)
  • rosary vine (Ceropegia).

Final Words – Choosing the ideal succulents

Not all succulents can grow in warmer and drier climates. You can check out the USDA Hardiness Zone Map to know the plants that are ideally suited for specific hot regions in the United States. Be sure to follow this guide when adjusting your succulents to bloom in a dry climate.

Adjusting to growing succulents in warmer and drier climates

Elephant Bush Succulent- Portulacaria Afra

Elephant Bush - Portulacaria Afra

Elephant Bush is opulent and larger than life. Also known as the Portulacaria Afra, this is a succulent that grows into a bush. It is a part of the Didiereaceae family. Its unique feature is in its ability to grow to amazing heights. It has stems that appear woody in nature with small leaves all along with them. These stems are also bendy, making these plants ideal for using in hanging baskets.

Lots of space is needed for the portulacaria afra succulent, especially if you want it to achieve its maximum growth. It can grow up to 12ft tall. Wondering how this succulent got the name Elephant Bush? It had little to do with its ability to reach such great heights. In its native South Africa, this plant’s leaves have been food for elephants. In the wild, it can exceed the height of 12ft, with some being recorded as reaching even 20ft. It is found in places that are rocky and dry, on slopes.

Not to worry, when growing it indoors, it only grows a few feet tall. It is also non-toxic to people and animals. Since it is flexible in look and feel, being able to fit a hanging basket, it is an ideal ornamental plant.

Elephant Bush - Portulacaria Afra
One of The Most Famous Indoor Succulent @dwarfjadebonsai

Features of The Elephant Bush

The main features of the Elephant Bush are the stems and the leaves. The stems are dark brown in color, with the leaves being small and green.

In the wild, this plant blooms with flowers in clusters. These are normally a range of colors, including white, purple and pink. However, when cultivated, it is exceptionally rare for Elephant Bush to flower. The only way to achieve this result is to ensure that the conditions are exactly the same as its native habitat.

Elephant Bush plants are lovers of light, requiring some extra thought if they are to be kept indoors. They need to be kept close to the windows so that they can benefit from both light and warmth. This is best achieved with a south-facing window where it can get at least six hours of light each day.

When keeping this plant, it is advised that you leave it in one location. It can get damaged when moving from indoors to outdoors. This is because of exposure to direct sunlight. When it is not used to this exposure, the leaves can quickly burn outdoors. This plant is able to survive in cold temperatures since it is tolerant to frost. However, in the event of snow, you may want to move your plant indoors.

Make sure you also check out “Why Succulents Grow Tall and What to Do About it” for more info on seeing why certain succulents grow this way.

Elephant Bush - Portulacaria Afra
Characteristics of The Elephant Bush @dwarfjadebonsai

Propagating Your Elephant Bush Succulents

To grow your own Elephant Bush, propagation can give excellent results. Starting out in the spring or early summer will ensure excellent results.

All you need to do is plant a cutting that has been dried out and calloused. The soil should be moist. Once planted, in a few weeks, a new Elephant Bush will have taken root and the leaves bloom.

The weather where you are propagating will influence how you water your plant. If the area is humid, then use minimal water. If the plant is not exposed to constant and consistent sunlight, then you can use less water as well. Also, be aware of rain so that if it does rain while you are propagating, you resist watering your plant as this could affect the roots causing rot.

Want more info on root rot on succulents? Check out our piece “What is Root Rot & How Do You Fix it?” and learn techniques on how to fix this problem.

Quick Tips to a Thriving Elephant Bush

Keeping your Elephant Bush in the best possible health requires the following:

  • Consistent exposure to sunlight, with partial shade for protection
  • Use a stake to help keep the plant stable as it grows bigger
  • Sandy soil with extra perlite will help elevate drainage
  • Potted Elephant Bush should be repotted every two years

If you are starting out with caring for succulents, then this is an ideal plant for you to keep. It requires minimal care and can add character to a succulent garden, both indoors and outdoors.

BE SURE TO ALSO READ:

Elephant Bush - Portulacaria Afra
Care For Your Elephant @dwarfjadebonsai

Thank you for reading! Enjoyed learning about the Elephant Bush succulent? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “The Most Common Issues Amongst Succulent Growers“. With this ebook you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents. 

Be sure to also check out similar articles on rare succulents like the Elephant Bush to spark up your interest. Check out “Crassula perforata – String of buttons” or even “Pachyphytum Oviferum — Moonstones“.

Happy Planting! ?

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