Sedum Reflexum

Sedum Reflexum – Everything You Need to Know

Sedum reflexum is also commonly called Sedum rupestre or Jenny’s Stonecrop. It is a cold-hardy perennial succulent that is native to North America. As the succulent grows, it forms a mat shape to use it as a lawn alternative.

sedum reflexum
Sedum Reflexum @Pinterest

Jenny’s Stonecrop is a drought-tolerant succulent that can thrive in dry regions. Also, Sedum reflexum is edible and can be used in making salads, even though it slightly tastes like acid.

This article is for you if you want to know more about identifying, growing, and caring for Sedum reflexum succulents.

How to Identify Reflexum Succulents

Sedum reflexum belongs to the Crassulaceae family. It is called a “stonecrop” because it usually grows in stony areas. It is a strong, slightly upright succulent that grows up to 12 inches and produces yellow flowers that are bent in bud.

The leaves of the Sedum reflexum succulents are lush, terete, and with pointed tips. Unlike most succulents, the leaves Sedum reflexum do not form tight clusters in the summer.

Bear in mind that the Sedum reflexum succulents do not bloom in the first year. When they finally bloom, usually during the summer, they will form clusters of yellow flowers. These flowers grow on tall stalks which you may need to prune if they are out of shape.

How to Care for Sedum Reflexum Succulents

You have to consider the following requirements to grow your Sedum reflexum succulents successfully:

Light

Jenny’s Stonecrop can be grown in partial or full sun. For the golden foliage to look its best, you need to grow the plant under direct sunlight.

Soil

Sedum reflexum needs to be planted in well-draining soil with a pH of 6.0 – 7.0 (mildly acidic to neutral). You can plant Jenny’s Stonecrop in gravelly or sandy soils, even if they are not that packed with vital nutrients.

Water

After planting the Sedum reflexum succulent, you need to water it. Once it matures, it becomes resistant to drought. However, your plant can die if the soil is waterlogged or contains heavy clay.

If you grow Jenny’s Stonecrops in a pot, you might need to water them more frequently than if they were planted in the ground.

Temperature and Humidity

Sedum reflexum succulents can be grown in the USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 3 to 9. This means that it can survive at a temperature of – 30 to 30 degrees Fahrenheit.

While this plant can withstand heat to a considerable extent, you should move it indoors during a heatwave. Also, Sedum reflexum plant can tolerate high humidity.

Fertilizer

Jenny’s Stonecrops do not need fertilizers. If the nutrients are not adequate for the plant to grow, consider using lean soil or compost. Using fertilizers for Sedum reflexum will make it stretch and grow out of proportion.

Pruning

If your Jenny’s Jenny’s Stonecrops are growing too big, you can prune them to stay in shape. Use hand pruners to trim off the stems growing out of proportion. Also, get rid of any dead material you notice on the plant.

The only time of the year you should not prune your Sedum reflexum is when the temperature is too high or too low.

Propagating Reflexum Succulents

There are three ways of propagating Sedum reflexum succulents: tip cutting, stem cutting, and seed propagation. Let us take a closer look at them:

Propagating from Tip Cutting

Propagating from tip cutting is one of the easiest ways of propagating Sedum reflexum succulents. This propagation technique involves taking the tip of a healthy leaf and sticking half of the tip in the well-draining soil. If you notice a tug in the soil after three or four weeks, that is a sign that the tip cutting is developing roots, which will become more evident in the coming days.

Propagating from Stem Cutting

To propagate Sedum reflexum succulents by stem cuttings, cut off a stem from a parent plant and plant it in the ground or a succulent pot with well-draining soil.

The best time to propagate by stem cuttings is during the spring when the plant just starts growing.

In three weeks, you will notice new tender roots spring up from the cuttings. Water the roots once a week until they mature.

Seed Propagation

To propagate Sedum reflexum from seeds, bury the seeds in moist soil and keep the pot in an environment with a temperature of 80 – 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

The downside of propagating Jenny’s Stonecrop from seeds is that seeds take a while to germinate. Also, some hybrid varieties of Sedum reflexum cannot be grown from seeds because they contain different genetic materials and the outcome is unpredictable.

Sedum Reflexum Pest Problems

Sedum reflexum succulents are usually attacked by bacteria, snails and slug if grown in a damp soil. Similarly, overwatering invites scale insects, aphids, and mealybugs to your succulents.

If you do not want to experience any trouble with insects and pests, do not overwater your Sedum reflexum succulents. Also, provide a well-draining soil and adequate light for the plant.

To know if your Jenny’s Stonecrops are infested by insects, examine the plant for any trace of a honey-like substance. Also, check if the leaves of the plants are wrinkled and shriveled.

If you notice any of these signs, you can get rid of the pest by spraying isopropyl alcohol solution on the succulents. When spraying this solution, be very careful so that you do not damage the succulents’ waxy coating.

You can also use insecticidal soap to eliminate mealybugs and aphids. But bear in mind that the outer layer of the succulents can be washed away with insecticidal soaps. So, ensure you test the soap on a small part of your plant and see how it reacts before spraying the entire plant.

If you need a safer method of getting rid of insects, use a natural organic insecticide like pyrethroid.

How to Care for Dudleya Succulents

How to Care for Dudleya Succulents

Have you ever heard of Dudleya succulents?

Well, it may be the first time you are hearing anything about them. The anonymity of this succulent plant genus is due to its small number of species and resemblance to other succulents from another naming.

Dudleya succulents are native to the states to the West of America, and some have their native homes in Mexico. There are between 40-50 species of Dudleya succulents. The dry summers and mild cold winter seasons favor the Dudleya in their native homes.

An exciting nickname for the beautiful flowered dudleya succulents is ‘Liveforever’. True to it, the dudleya plants can live for up to a century. Well, it all depends on how best you care for your dudleya succulents.

Want century-old succulents that you will gift your children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren? Read on to find best practices for rearing the fun-to-see dudleyas.

How to Care for Dudleya Succulents
A native of West America @yamamotohl

Growing a Dudleya Succulent

Dudleya plants do well in warm, dry climates. However, it is not all bad news for chalky succulent lovers living in cold climates. Some species such as the D. cymosa are cold hardy.

Replicating the California climate when growing your succulents is making your succulent thrive with ease.

The Perfect Spot for Growing

Let us make things easy by making it simpler to keep your plants happy.

Optimum growing conditions characterize the perfect growing spot. You should be asking which these conditions are.

Water

Dudleyas are known to be happy in a dry climate. Unlike cacti native to the South American highlands and the Amazon forest, they will require far much lesser watering.

During summer it is advisable to cut down on your watering program considerably. For plants growing on sand, consider slight watering. The reason why no watering is essential during summer is that these plants are dormant over the same period — never mistaken this dormancy with a need for watering.

So when do you water this long-living plant?

Dudleya genus plants grow and bloom through fall. This is the perfect time to fill your watering cans. Water at the base of the plant and be careful enough to avoid the leaves.

 

How to Care for Dudleya Succulents
Care for Overwatering @addytude

Sunlight

Ever wondered why the ‘LiveLong’ succulents have a chalky appearance?

The plants love rays from the sun and should be left out for as long as the sun shines. The chalky appearance is useful when you overdo the sunshine exposure.

The whitish appearance on the surface of dudleya plants is due to the epicuticular layer of wax, otherwise known as farina. The core function of this layer is protecting the plant from any harm that results from too much sunshine.

Avoid disturbing this layer by touching the plant in any way.

Soils

The perfect soil mix for dudleya succulents is one that drains excessive water in the fastest way possible. Just like any other cactus plant, its roots are shallow. Too much watering weakens the roots. Rotting roots are also common phenomena of too much water. Conversely, dudleyas will require little watering after all.

Be sure to check out our guide on making your own soil. What could be better for your succulents?!

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Temperature

Think about California and the scorching heat is wholly evident in your mind. To the grower, high temperatures can be an issue but not for a dudleya plant. They thrive in areas where the heat can be as high as what Californians live under.

How to Care for Dudleya Succulents
Temperature Can Be a Problem @onesuccydayatatime

 

Care for Diseases & Pests

Every living plant is prone to pests and diseases, and the dudleya succulents are no exception either. Ensuring optimal growth conditions is a sure way of providing healthy and vibrant looking plants. For instance, vent from too much watering and always maintaining good air circulation for your succulent friend.

If by any chance you notice any attack for your plants, take action immediately to wade off any further damage. Being keen when inspecting your plants is key to being aware of any attack. You will notice a change to the chalky white surface layer or holes on the foliage.

Some of the common pests that attack dudleya succulents are aphids, mealybugs, gnats, snails, and slugs.

For more guides to taking care of your succulents, check out our articles like “What to do When Succulent Leaves are Splitting?” or “Why is My Succulent Rotting?“.

 

Some Interesting Facts for Dudleya Succulents

Here are some interesting facts that every dudleya succulent owner needs to know.

  • Dudleya species are either branching or non-branching. The ground-spreading and low-level plants are termed as branching while those that only realize single rosettes are unbranching.
  • During summer seasons when no watering is done, the succulents may wilt but will regain the energetic plump look when watering resumes.
  • The dudleya species that flower are an excellent attraction for hummingbirds
How to Care for Dudleya Succulents
Some Facts About Dudleya Succulents @popon.purun

As days go by, dudleya succulents are becoming rare to find. You can only see a handful of them out in the wild. Some of these plants are now protected by the law with punitive measures for smugglers. If you happen to have one, breed it carefully as it can last a century.

If you want to continue the discussion, you can join and like our exclusive Facebook Group, Succulent City Plant Lounge! The group is a great place to discuss and connect with other succulent fans. Get tips, ask questions, answer questions, and make friends! 

Also, be sure to keep an eye on our Succulent City Youtube channel! We are organizing to release some great quality videos to help all succulent parents have plants that thrive. Be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss out on new videos.

Enjoy reading our article about “How to Care for Dudleya Succulents”? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “Essential Tools for Planting the Best Succulents“. With this ebook you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents. 

Happy planting! ?

 

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