14 Sedum Succulents You Need In Your Garden-Succulent Lovers

In the extensive Crassulaceae family, the genus Sedum gives you, a succulent lover, probably more than you can ever ask for. And that is not just in terms of the available plant options – there are about 600 of them.

In all of these species, you’ll find varied growth habits – the creeping ones and shrubs. Aside from that, you won’t get just a single foliage color, shape, and size. There is green, red, gray, etc. for the colors. The shapes also vary – oval, round, or needle-like.

Add the diversity in flowers, and you’ll quickly rush out to grab a few Sedum succulents. But which options will you go for? There are tons to choose, and the following are an excellent starting point.

1. Golden Sedum (Sedum adolphii)

The golden sedum can attain a height of between 10 and 12 inches and spreads to about 24 inches. The good thing about this Sedum succulent?

It’s a rapid grower, and of course, it’s a beauty.

It has thick evergreen foliage that spots a tinge of yellow in normal light conditions. When exposed to bright sunlight, the leaves turn reddish around the tips. These color schemes are further spruced up by white to yellow star-shaped blooms that come out at the close of winter or early spring.

One thing to look for when growing this Sedum succulent is the frost. Any contact and your plant will be no more.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum adolphii @toriawats

2. Giant Jelly Bean (Sedum lucidum)

The distinctive feature of the giant jelly bean is the super thick glossy leaves. The leaves are green, but just like the golden sedum above, they develop a red tint at the tips when exposed to bright light.

The plant grows to a height of approximately 20 cm and produces yellow-centered white flowers during winter.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum lucidum @liveasucculentlife

3. Coastal Stonecrop (Sedum litoreum)

This is a bit smaller than those two mentioned above – it grows to a height of just 15 cm at most. It bears obovate leaves that are bright green.

The coastal stonecrop can either be simple or branched (usually at the base) and produces pale yellow star-shaped flowers.

Liking the picks so far? Be sure you check out “Succulent Leaves Changing Color? Find Out What That Means” to see what changing color on your succulent means.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum litoreum @stephmerchak

4. Sedum mocinianum

If you were to take only one Sedum succulent from the whole of this list, then it should be Sedum mocinianum.

The leaves grow together in thick rosettes and are green. The whole of the plant is covered by numerous tiny hairs that make it appear bluish. As with most Sedums so far, Sedum mocinianum throws up blooms in winter. These flowers’ white color is broken by the dark red anthers.

Though majorly small, this jewel can grow to a length of 90 cm.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum mocinianum @mai.bloom

5. Sedum confusum

This is the perfect Sedum for ground cover.

Sedum confusum grows rapidly to cover a length of 25 cm tops. The most pleasing aspects of this cupcake are the leaves. They are glossy, dark green, and grow dominantly near the tips of the long trailing branches. On top of this, they have an oval shape and develop traces of pink around the edges when exposed to full sun.

In summer, they put out adorable bunches of yellow-colored flowers in the shape of stars.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum confusum @coastalcacti

6. Sedum allantoides

This is another awesome Sedum succulent with Mexico as its natural habitat. Being not so winter hardy, you’re better off excluding it from your garden if you leave outside of USDA hardiness zones 9b to 11b.

Sedum allantoides itself is shrubby and, just like the Salexanderi above, has the potential to attain a height of 12 inches. Its thick pale green leaves form rosettes and have a powdery look. Its green-white flowers add more pomp during the summer.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum allantoides @barokahnursery

7. Sedum bulbiferum

This one is a bit more cold tolerant compared to Sedum allantoides above. You can grow it outside form USDA hardiness zone 5b through to 10b. This beauty has quite long stems – 2 feet is the approximate length of each.

The Sedum bulbiferum flowers in summer with the blooms being star-shaped and yellow.

Check out more from the succulent family with “16 Most Popular Succulent Species In The World“. Find new succulents for your garden.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum bulbiferum @chappyandmikky

8. Sedum commixtum

Quite a notable entry on this list.

This succulent has unique leaves that vary in color as it grows. The fleshy leaves start as grayish-blue and turn into a tinge of purple-red. These leaves form rosettes on the nearly 30 cm mature stem. And as the others so far, the Sedum commixtum bears yellow star-shaped flowers sprouting in winter.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum commixtum @potty_about_plants

9. Tasteless Stonecrop (Sedum sexangulare)

This little beauty has an adorable leaf arrangement. Its name – sexangulare – was inspired by the leaves. They are arranged in six spirals hence the species name, which translates to “six-angled.

With its small height of just 15 cm at maturity, the tasteless stonecrop blooms in mid-summer in June and July. The flowers have the signature color and shape of the Sedum succulent– yellow and star-shaped.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum sexangulare @vistaverdearranjos

10. Blue Spruce Stonecrop (Sedum reflexum)

Other common names include prickmadam, crooked yellow stonecrop, jenny’s stonecrop, and stone orpine.

This succulent isn’t much of an upwards grower. The tallest it can grow is between six to eight inches. Its lack of height is compensated to a small extent by its spread – it can cover ground equal to as much as 2 feet wide.

Although leaves are blue-gray, light green, gray, and yellow are also other common colors. The leaves have a needle-like shape.

Interested in taking on a new adventure by gardening your succulents? Check out “7 Mini Garden Hand Tools For Your Succulents” for our full guide to tools you might need in your garden.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum reflexum @toffeee300

11. Nevius Stonecrop (Sedum nevii)

This is such a flexible jewel in terms of all the areas you can grow it outside. It can tolerate low winter temperatures of up to -40o F. This implies it can ideally be grown in a garden in quite a number of places. Areas in USDA hardiness zones 3a to 10b.

The nevius stonecrop is such a dense-growing producing numerous stems lined with gray-green foliage at the tips. The leaves are also narrow and pointed.

12. Mexican Sedum (Sedum stahlii)

You can also call it the Coral Bells. It is the unique Sedum succulent so far with its fleshy egg-shaped deep red leaves. The plant itself can grow up to 10 inches (25 cm) tall and spreads across 12 inches (30 cm).

The flowers are yellow and star-shaped – as with the rest of the Sedums so far – and emerge between late spring and early summer. To grow the Mexican sedum outside, you have to be in the USDA hardiness zones 7b to 11b.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum stahlii @solnechnyi_dvorik

13. Sedum treleasei

The leaves of this succulent are a sight to behold with their pale blue-green hue. As usual, they’re fleshy and are flat on top while being rounded below. The leaves don’t always maintain this color, though. Mature ones have traces of yellow or pink towards the tips 

Sedum treleasei can attain a maximum height of up to a foot (30cm). The plant is winter hardy in USDA hardiness zones 9a to 11b.

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum treleasei @hookedonsuccs

14. Sedum booleanum

This low growing beauty has a bushy habit rising to approximately 6 inches (15 cm) tall. The leaves are fleshy and bright blue-green and have an overlapping arrangement.

Unique to this Sedum succulent are the flowers with their red pigmentation.

BE SURE TO ALSO READ:

14 Sedum Succulents You Need in Your Garden
Sedum booleanum @botanical.concepts

Thank you for reading with us today! Be sure to check out related articles from the Sedum family to extend your succulent picks like “Sedum Spurium ‘Roseum’ Plants— the Perfect Addition to Your Garden” or “Sedum Morganianum— the Burros Tail Succulent Plant“.

Enjoyed learning about these Sedum succulent picks? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor“. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents. 

Happy Planting! 🌵

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents |Succulent City

Before we begin, how about some fresh produce! This post is sponsored by Amazon Fresh, enjoy unlimited grocery shipping for only $14.99/mo! Sign up for a free trial here. It’s great for our office snacks, it might be great for your home too!

Stonecrop succulents, also known as Sedums like this one, are a hardy little group of plants that are perfect for outdoor gardens! They can survive in below freezing temperatures, poor soil conditions, and hot, sunny weather. No matter what growing zone you live in or where you plant them in your garden, they’ll be able to thrive!

Sedums come in colors like green, red, purple, and yellow. They usually produce yellow, pink, or white blooms that attract birds and butterflies. They’re just as pretty as they are hardy, so they’re fantastic plants to have in your garden!

Caring for sedums is pretty easy, but you’ll still need a few essential tips—so keep reading!

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@succy_place

Origins

Most varieties of sedum are native to Europe and Asia, so they can handle a temperate climate. Sedum is grown in many gardens in North American today because of their cold hardiness and pretty appearance. Sedum has beautiful, showy flowers and glossy leaves in colors like green, blue, maroon, purple, orange, and gold.

Most varieties of sedum are creeping, which means that they spread out as they grow and fill up bare spaces in gardens. Some varieties of sedum, though, are tall. Tall varieties grow up instead of out and get to be about 2 or 3 feet high. They’re prized for their beautiful flowers!

Caring for Sedums

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@succy_place

By now we’ve probably convinced you that you need some beautiful stonecrop succulents in your garden, so now you need to learn how to care for them! Well, we’ve got your back! You’ll have no problem caring for sedums even if you have a black thumb as long as you follow these tips.

Soil Requirements

The easiest way to kill a sedum is to let it sit in water! Planting sedums in porous soil that drains quickly helps prevent water from pooling and damaging their roots.

If you’re planting your stonecrops in pots, make sure that you use ones with drainage holes and fill them with a porous succulent soil.

If you’re planting stonecrop succulents out in your garden, you should test the soil to make sure it drains quickly enough before you put the succulents in the ground. To do this, dig a hole that’s a foot deep and fill it with water. If the water drains in thirty minutes or less, your soil is ready for your stonecrops! If not, you’ll need to mix three inches of something gritty, like perlite or sand, into the soil to make it more porous.

Water Requirements

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@succy_place

Overwatering is another major cause of death for stonecrop succulents! Stonecrop succulents that are kept outside don’t need a whole lot of water. During the winter when they’re dormant, they may not need any water at all if your area gets rainfall. During the spring, summer, and fall, you’ll only need to water them once a week if they’re a tall variety. Creeping sedums can get by on even less water.

If you’re growing sedum indoors, your plants will need more water than ones kept outside. We recommend that you water your sedums about once a week during the spring through fall. During the winter, cut back on watering your plants. Once every three to four weeks should be sufficient—you only want to water them enough to keep their leaves from drying out and puckering.

Before you water your sedums, make sure the soil is completely dry. You can test this by sticking your finger about an inch deep into the soil. If it’s wet, put down the watering can! If it feels dry, your succulent is thirsty and needs a drink, so proceed with watering!

You should follow the soak and dry method when watering your sedums. To do this, grab your watering can and pour water onto the soil until it starts running out of the drainage holes of the pot. If your sedums are outdoors, pour enough water on the soil until it feels wet about an inch down. Don’t water your plants again until the soil feels completely dry to avoid overwatering them!

Light and Temperature Requirements

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@succulent_crazy_sisters

Outdoors, sedums can thrive no matter where you put them in the garden. You can plant them in partial shade or full sun and they’ll do well. Here’s some great outdoor pots if you don’t plan to have them in the regular ground or soil. Our team member has one of these bad boys actually!

Indoors, sedums need bright sunlight, so keep them near the sunniest window in your home or under a grow light.

As for temperature, sedums are pretty hardy. Most varieties can survive in below freezing temperatures of negative twenty or thirty degrees, so they’re the perfect outdoor succulents for cold growing zones. No need for ridiculous plant covers like this, nope!

Fertilizer Requirements

Stonecrops don’t absolutely need fertilizer. Since they can survive in poor soil conditions, they don’t need extra nutrients from fertilizer to keep growing. If you want to save money or time, it’s a step you can skip.

But if you want your stonecrops to be the healthiest they can be (we know you do!), then they’ll benefit from a few applications of diluted fertilizer during the spring, summer or fall.

Diluting water-soluble fertilizer is easy—just use half as much fertilizer as the directions call for. So if the back of the box says to dissolve 1 tablespoon of fertilizer in a gallon of water, you should only use ½ tablespoon.

If you’d rather not use chemical fertilizer, you can apply a layer of organic compost to the soil once during the fall.

Propagating Sedum

Succulent propagation can seem kind of intimidating, but propagating a sedum is super easy! All you have to do to be able to grow brand new plants is take a couple of stem cuttings. We promise your sedum won’t even notice those stems are missing!

To take some cuttings, grab a sharp garden knife and cut the stem of your sedum below the leaves. You want the whole cutting to be at least three inches long, so keep that in mind when you’re cutting the stem.

Any leaves on the bottom inch of the cutting should be stripped, and then the cutting should be planted in some moist succulent soil. You should keep the soil just barely moist at all times over the next week or two. You can mist the soil with a spray bottle like this to keep it damp. Once the cuttings take root you can water them normally, just like you would any other sedum.

Make sure you keep your cuttings in a place with bright but indirect sunlight. Sedums can’t handle harsh sunlight or freezing temps until they’ve matured and grown a bit!

ALSO READ:

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
@worldofsucculents

Now that you know all about stonecrop succulents, are you going to plant any in your garden? Let us know in the comments section below!

If you already have these and want to ask specific questions in how to care for them even more, be sure to ask our exclusive members for TIPS and TRICKS that they find to be super useful. (It helps our team members a lot).

Enjoyed learning about All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting! ?

Sedum Spurium (Roseum Plant)— the Perfect Addition to Your Garden

Sedum Spurium ‘Roseum’ plants are a beautiful addition to any garden. They have bright green scalloped leaves and pale pink flowers shaped like stars. They grow quickly compared to other succulents, so they’re often used as ground cover. They’ll bring any bare areas of your garden to life with their vibrant green foliage.

These plants may look dainty, but they’re actually quite hardy. They can survive in poor soil conditions and below freezing temperatures. They can even tolerate droughts that last several months, though we don’t recommend depriving them of water for that long!

If you’d like to learn more about this beautiful on the outside, tough on the inside succulent, then keep reading!

Sedum Spurium ‘Roseum’ Succulent Plant

Sedum Spurium plants are native to the Caucasus, a mountainous region between the Black Sea and Caspian Sea, as well as Iran and Turkey.

Sedum Spurium plants are part of the genus Sedum. Sedum is derived from the Latin word “sedeo” which means to sit. Sedums got this name because of one of their most common growth patterns. Many Sedums grow or “sit” on top of objects like rocks. This Sedum is also called two row stonecrop and Caucasian stonecrop.

Sedum Spurium ‘Roseum’ plants, the type of succulent that we’re going to talk about today, are a cultivar of the Sedum Spurium. Cultivars are sort of like plant varieties, except for the fact that they were bred by humans and aren’t found in nature. Some cultivars are a hybrid of two different species of plants. Others started out as a mutated plant that humans continued to breed because they liked its characteristics.

Single quotes are placed around the third word in a cultivar’s name to indicate that it’s a cultivated variety. That naming convention is a little clunky, so we’re probably going to refer to this plant as the Roseum plant from here on out. Roseum plants are also called rose stonecrops because of their pink, rosy leaves.

How to Care for Rose Stonecrops

The Best Soil for Roseum Plants

Sedum Spurium plants are known for their ability to survive in nutritionally poor soil. If you don’t know what the soil quality in your garden is like, this succulent is a great choice because it will be able to survive no matter what.

With that being said, you should aim to put your Roseum plant in a nutrient rich soil. It also requires soil that has good drainage, which is why it’s often planted in rock gardens. You can’t go wrong with a commercial succulent or cactus soil blend. It has the kind of gritty, porous materials in it that Roseum plants need to avoid root rot.

How Often Should Your Water Roseum Plants?

Sedum Spurium succulents need very little water and can even survive several months of drought.

We usually recommend that you water your succulents once a week, but this particular plant will do better with more infrequent waterings. Twice a month should be enough, but make sure that you watch out for signs of underwatering. If your succulent is thirsty, its leaves will get wrinkly and lose their characteristic plumpness and firmness.

To learn how to water your Roseum plant properly, check out our watering article that helped over 2000 people.

How Much Light do Roseum Plants Need?

Roseum plants can handle both full sun and partial shade. This versatility makes them great for outdoor gardens. You can plant them in the sunniest part of your garden or keep them in a planter on a covered patio. They’ll do great in either location!

Find out more than one way you can give light to your succulent plant here.

Temperature Requirements

Another reason why Sedum Spurium plants are perfect for gardens is because they’re cold hardy. This particular cultivar can stay outside in below freezing temperatures. Even if it’s negative twenty or thirty outside, this succulent will be ok, which is pretty remarkable! A lot of succulents wouldn’t survive if you left them outside in those kinds of weather conditions.

Fertilizing Roseum Plants

Roseum succulents like their fertilizer how they like their water—in moderation. These plants are fast growers on their own, so they don’t need much help from fertilizer. They can also thrive without a lot of nutrients, so they won’t really benefit if you fertilize them more frequently. In fact, too much fertilizer can actually hurt them. Giving them too much nitrogen, one of the main ingredients in fertilizer, softens their leaves and makes them more susceptible to rot.

You only need to feed your Roseum plants about once or twice during their active growing season. They’re dormant in the winter, so fertilize them in the summer. To prevent your plants from getting too much nitrogen, you should use a low-nitrogen fertilizer.

You can tell if a fertilizer is low-nitrogen by looking at the numbers on the packaging. Fertilizers have three numbers on them that indicate how much nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium they contain. A 5-10-10 fertilizer, for example, has 5% nitrogen, 10% phosphorus, and 10% potassium. That’s the kind of fertilizer you want to go for—one with a first number that’s lower than the other two.

It’s also a good idea to dilute your fertilizer to half strength. If you have a water soluble fertilizer, it’s easy to do. Just add half as much fertilizer to the water as the instructions call for. So for example, if the instructions say to dissolve 1 tablespoon of fertilizer into a gallon of water, you’d only use ½ tablespoon.

Where to Plant Your Sedum Spurium

Sedum Spurium is a type of creeping succulent that spreads out and makes great ground cover. They grow much faster than other succulents, filling up the space around them with lush greenery.

They look great in containers with much taller succulents like cacti and Snake Plants. They grow low and hang over the sides of the containers you plant them in, so they provide a nice contrast in arrangements with lots of tall plants.

Try planting this succulent in pallet gardens, hanging baskets, planting beds, or rock gardens. They’re perfect for any bare spots in your garden, too, because they’ll fill them in quickly.

We love to keep our Roseum plants outside because they attract butterflies. You can keep yours indoors, but they’re practically made for outdoor areas since they’re cold hardy and sun-loving.

Propagating Rose Stonecrops

Cultivars like the Roseum plant have to be propagated by cuttings in order to retain all of their characteristics. If you try to grow a cultivar from seeds, the new plant will have different colorings and traits than the parent plant.

Roseum plants have no problem spreading out and propagating on their own, but you can propagate even more of them using tip cuttings.

Propagating with Tip Cuttings

Tip cuttings are taken from the top of the plant near the leaves. To take a tip cutting, grab a clean, sharp garden knife and cut just a few inches below the leaves of your plant. Remove some of the lower leaves to expose the stem and then let the cutting dry out for a little while. You’ll know it’s ready when you see a hard, dry callus on the cut side of the stem.

Now, place it in some succulent soil, cut side down. Grab a spray bottle and mist the cutting with some water. You’ll want to water it once or twice a day to keep it moist. Keep it in an area of your home that gets bright but indirect sunlight. Too much sunlight can harm fragile cuttings.

Your cutting will take root in a few weeks, and as it grows, you can begin to water it less. Don’t worry if it doesn’t take root—unfortunately, that happens sometimes.

If your cutting doesn’t root the first time, you can change up your propagation strategy and see if that helps. Some people don’t let their cuttings dry out before they plant them—they put the freshly cut stems in succulent soil right away. Some people also use rooting hormone to encourage their cuttings to root. Try out some of these different techniques and see what gets you the best results.

ALSO READ:


Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complementary guide. 

We hope that this post has encouraged you to plant this unique cultivar in your garden and given you the confidence to care for it. This is a wonderful plant for both people with brown thumbs and green thumbs because it’s so resilient. So don’t hesitate to buy one even if you’re not a gardening expert. Happy planting!

Sedum Morganianum— the Burros Tail Succulent Plant

You’ll agree with me that in the recent years the popularity of succulents has grown in leaps and bounds. These little chaps are seen in almost everything, from hanging planters like the image below to boutonnieres. The succulent fandom is not only sweeping the internet, but also botanical gardens, home décor stores, and plant nurseries.

They’re not only idiosyncratic, cute little plants trending in gardens, but also being used as wedding and home décor nuggets.

The wide plethora of these unique plants leaves a succulent newbie literally spoilt for choice. From the “living pebbles” to the stoic saguaro cacti, succulents are one of the most diverse plant groups.

What if I introduced you to the world of the most sought-after and versatile succulents of our age? Ladies and gentlemen, help me welcome: Mr. Burro’s tail.

Hanging succulent planters
Hanging Succulent Planters @sassandbelle

Sedum Morganianum

The burro’s tail is a descendant of the genus Sedum, hailing from the Crassulaceae family. The scientists saw it fit to name it Sedum morganianum. It’s popularly known as the burro’s tail, horse’s tail, lamb’s tail or donkey’s tail. Burro’s tail was thus named because of its pendulous stems and overlapping leaves that resemble an animal’s tail.

This perennial succulent is native to southern Mexico and Honduras. Sedum morganianum has been cultivated since 1935, however, it’s true origin was discovered in 2008 by Mexican botanists in Tenampa, Veracruz. Best used as an indoor hanging plant, burro’s tail is extensively grown as a house plant in Northern America.

Sedum morganianum is an award-winning, ever-green, easy-to-grow succulent with trailing stems arising from the base that may grow up to 3 feet long or more. The burro’s tail scooped the Royal Horticultural Society’s award of Garden Merit in 1993 – even before it’s native origin was discovered!

This attractive succulent has long trailing stems completely covered by thick, lance-shaped leaves that are blue-green in color. Burro’s tail is best grown in suspended pots or containers so that the stems can freely cascade downwards.

Though rare, sedum morganianum produces small, unscented, star-shaped flowers which are pink, red or lavender in color during spring and summer.

This succulent, mostly thought to be a cactus, has brittle stems with loosely attached leaves that fall off at the gentlest touch. Due to its delicate nature, it’s advisable to keep it away from disturbances.

Sedum morganianum is sometimes confused with the Myrtle Spurge or the Creeping Spurge which is at times erroneously referred to as Donkey’s Tail plant. Myrtle Spurge is a highly poisonous plant which should be handled very cautiously.

The burro’s tail provides an intriguing texture as a houseplant or captivating green exterior in outdoors and landscapes.

Sedum morganianum burros tail
Burro’s Tail @succsgalore

What Makes the Burro’s Tail so Popular?

  • It’s trailing stems covered by fleshy, blue-green leaves overhanging a pot displays a one-of-a-kind indoor aesthetic.
  • The succulent is easy to grow with very little care needed.
  • Simple propagation technique.
  • One can grow it as a houseplant or a garden plant.
  • Sedum morganianum can be grown in a small pot as it grow’s vertically downwards hence little space is needed.
  • It is pet and toddler friendly.
  • It does not need a lot of water to grow.

How to Take Care of Burro’s Tail Succulent

The burro’s tail is an easy-care succulent, suiting the neglectful plant care lover or the novice gardener. Whether grown out on the garden or as an indoor plant, growing a burro’s tail is quite a snap.

The following conditions are ideal for a healthy Sedum morganianum.

Lighting for Burro’s Tail

These succulents love bright sunlight, either directly or partially. A minimum of four hours is recommended. Avoid setting them up in very hot sun as the leaves bleach out and turn yellowish instead of the original blue-green color.

Insufficient light will cause the stem to have longer internodes thus lack of leaf compaction giving it a skimpy tail.

When you grow it indoors, place it on a sunny window to ensure absorption of maximum light. Outdoor burros should be shielded from very hot sun during the growing season to protect them from leaf color bleaching and cringing.

Ideal Climate for Burro’s Tails

In tropical climate, burro’s tail can stay outdoors throughout the year. Pull them indoors during freezing winter as they can’t stand it.

Sedum morganianum will grow well in room temperatures during the growing season. Ideal winter temperatures should be anywhere between 50 and 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Burros tail sedum morganianum
Sedum Morganianum @houseplantclub

Watering Burro’s Tail Succulent Plant

The burro’s tail is a succulent, which means it stores water mostly in its leaves. These plants use the stored water for its metabolic processes. They can use this water for quite some time. Therefore, the easiest way to kill a succulent would be overwatering it. Pumping a lot of water on succulents makes it more susceptible to root rot.

Use a watering tool like this to have better control for the amount of water you use.

The best way of ensuring safe watering of the burro’s tail is by using the “soak and dry” method. This is making sure the soil dries out completely in between watering.

Give it a generous, thorough watering once in two weeks and every week while in its growing season. Reduce watering during winter as these plants are inactive and don’t grow a lot.

A sure-fire way of knowing when next to water your sedum morganianum is by investigating the leaves. Once the leaves begin to shriven, then it needs a drink – a thorough one.

Best Soil for Sedum Morganianum

Like most succulents, the burro’s tail thrives on well-drained soil specific to cacti and succulents. You can create your own well-draining soil mixture by augmenting regular soil with equal parts of pumice or perlite.

Never use pure garden soil on succulents. They hate soaked soil and it is the major cause of root rot. Instead, use grainy soil or mixed garden soil because it’s well-draining and never holds water in. Here’s a great grainy and mixed bag of soil from Amazon that is highly rated.

To add a little bit of spice to your sedum morganianum, you can add worm castings to the soil. Burro’s tail fertilizer is really not necessary, but you can feed it twice or thrice only during its growing season. A weak solution of cactus fertilizer will get the job done.

Feeding it once a month is enough and during winter, don’t feed at all. Sedum morganianum doesn’t need any fertilizer during winter because it’s inactive.

Propagating Burro’s Tails

Propagating the burro’s tail is a very facile exercise. The plant can be propagated from stem or leaf cuttings. Propagating from leaves is the easiest. Simply pluck a few leaves from the burro’s tail stem and place them in moist soil.

After a few days, the propagated leaves will start to sprout. Once the baby burro’s tails are half an inch, you can transplant them in their own individual pots.

The stem propagation is also quite straight forward. Cut your desired stem-length. Remove the leaves a few inches from the bottom. leave the stem-cutting to dry for one week until it calluses.

Slightly moisten the soil and then plant the cutting. While planting, pin down your plant deep in the soil to avoid pulling off once it becomes heavy. The most important nutrient needed to grow sedum morganianum is lots of sunlight, therefore, place the new propagates near a window.

If you don’t have much experience with propagating succulents or plants in general, be sure to check our in-depth guide on how to propagate succulents successfully.

Last update on 2020-03-19 / Amazon

Repotting Burro’s Tail Succulent Plants

Repotting can always be done if the burro’s tail overgrows its pot or when the pot becomes too old to support the plant. Choose a pot with draining holes to keep your plants dry and easily breathing.

Before repotting, ensure the soil is dry. Gently remove the plant from the current pot. Identify the rotted roots and get rid of them together with the old soil. In case of any cuts on the plant, treat with fungicides. Put the plant in a new pot and cover with well-draining soil. Let the plant remain dry for a week. Slowly begin watering it lightly to prevent root rot.

It is not advisable to repot mature plants severally because of the brittle nature of the plant. Too much handling of the burro’s tail results in plant damage and loss of leaves as they’re very delicate.

Burro’s Tails Pests & Problems

Pests

The burro’s tail does not get attacked by a wide range of insects. The most common pests associated with burro’s tail is mealy bugs and aphids. You can hose them off with water or spray with a mixture of 1/5 rubbing alcohol to 4/5 water. If that fails to work, go for Neem oil which is an organic pest control alternative that is simple yet effective.

Root rot

Only caused by two things; overwatering or poor draining soil. Rotting may also graduate to the stem and crown. In case you notice such, collect the healthy leaves and stem tips and get rid of the rest of the plant.

Low light issues

Insufficient light causes the burro’s tail to have longer internodes with scanty leaves attached to the stem. Prune the weak parts and move the plant to well-lit area and ensure it receives four hours of bright sunlight every day.

Dropping leaves

Not really a problem but it’s nice to know that Sedum morganianum is very brittle and just a slight brush will cause the leaves to drop. Hanging the succulent is best done in places where objects or people can’t brush against it.

Poison Concerns

As per the ASPCA, the burro’s tail does not contain any poison and it’s therefore non-toxic to humans and pets alike. Caution should be taken however, not to confuse the plant with the poisonous Creeping Spurge or Myrtle Spurge which is erroneously referred to as the donkey’s tail.

Tips for Burro’s Tails

A healthy and mature Sedum morganianum plant will yield the longest stems, growing up to 4 feet in length. To grow your burro’s tail really long, observe the following best practices.

  • Give your burro’s tail plenty of Bright sunlight. Not “sun heat.”
  • Avoid overwatering your plant. Give a thorough watering once or twice a month.
  • Keep the plant away from places where people may brush against it.
  • Burro’s tail thrives best in room temperature and doesn’t like freeze winter. Therefore, keep it warm.
  • Use well-draining soil, preferably a commercial cactus mix or your own mixture of garden soil combined with pumice or perlite.

ALSO READ:

Sedum morganianum succulent burros tail
Burro’s Tail @shaughey04

Where to Buy Burro’s Tails

Sedum morganianum is easily available in plant nurseries and home garden centers. You can also find it online in sites such as Etsy and Amazon. Read our new article about where you can buy succulents for a full in-depth how to.

Fat Plants San Diego Succulent Plant(s) Fully Rooted in 4 inch...
  • FOR HEATED SHIPPING - please select Standard...
  • Fully rooted living succulent plant in a 4 inch...
  • Plants will arrive in individual gift packaging...
  • Fat Plants is a California licensed grower and...
  • See product description for more information on...

Last update on 2020-03-19 / Amazon


There you have it, the Sedum Morganianum succulent plant, also known as the burro’s tail. Be sure to read our other articles if you liked this one. We have more specific articles in the works now, in the meantime, comment your favorite succulent and we’ll write in-depth about it!

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

>