How to Repot a Cactus Plant

Repotting is an inevitable activity in the life of a cactus let alone any other succulent.

Due to the fact that it always growing (just as any plant), it is bound to overgrow its initial pot. And this necessitates a change for your plant to keep glowing.

Typically between 2-4 years, you’re going to have to repot your cacti, don’t you wish you had a new home this often?

Right below, you’ll learn about repotting a cactus (the right way) without killing your plant.

First off…

Requirements for Repotting Cactus Plants

Repotting isn’t much different from the initial potting. Below is a recap of the requirements.

The right pot or planter

When it comes to choosing a pot for your cactus, the size and material are of utmost importance.

Usually, a pot made of clay like these terra cotta pots made from Winlyn is preferred over a plastic one. The clay allows the roots to breath more easily which contributes to the general well-being of succulent plants.

Additionally, it boosts the drainage of the cacti potting mix hence providing just the ideal conditions for your cactus – scarce water.

On the size aspect, choose a pot that is neither too large or too small – depending on the size of the cactus you wish to pot. You want to make sure that there is just a bit of space between your plant and the pot’s walls. A super small pot will choke up the roots ultimately killing the plant. A larger than life pot will lead to the soil mix retaining water, and you know that means for your cactus.

If you don’t know what excessive water does to cacti or let alone any succulent, please be sure to read our article on when you should water succulents. It’s helped over 3000 people and it may help you too.

Also, don’t forget to ensure your pot has a few holes down there. A big enough and well flowing draining system will be crucial to your cacti’s growth.

The proper potting mix

Cacti, being succulents, require a potting mix that is well-draining to provide the water scarcity condition that they’re adapted to. So your normal soil mix is a no-no. (If you’re looking for a premium cacti soil mix, here’s one we highly recommend from Superfly Bonsai).

Instead, you can grab a commercial succulent mix prepared just for your cactus. A typical cacti/succulent potting mix contains a small amount of organic materials, sand, perlite and sphagnum peat moss.

Alternatively, you can prepare your own ideal mix at home as long as you have the ingredients – and it’s not some endless collection of stuff from the outer space, although that’d be pretty cool. Check out the ingredients your cacti soil mix will need.

  • Potting soil
  • Coarse sand
  • Pumice (perlite is also a good option here)

And the procedure is straightforward – mix the above ingredients with potting soil taking up a larger share of the combination while the other two ingredients sharing the remaining part equally.

For instance, 2 parts of potting soil can be combined with 1 part of coarse sand and 1 part of pumice/perlite.

To test if you’ve indeed ended up with the real thing, wet your mixture and try squeezing it. A good one should be coarse and crumby. If not, consider adding more of sand and pumice/perlite. The coarseness and crumbiness (is that a word?) is what allows your succulent soil to have a functional draining system.

how to repot cactus plant
@thepricklybitch

How to Repot a Cactus Plant

Here’s a refresher for when you first pot a cactus

In case you aren’t well informed on how to properly pot plants in the beginning, here is a quick reminder on what you need to do. Just follow the steps below, skip to the next section if you just want to learn how to repot your awesome prickly cactus.

  1. Place a well-draining material at the bottom of your pot. Gravel is fine.
  2. Fill up the pot with a well-draining mix – commercial or homemade – up to a third way of the pot.
  3. Try placing your plant in the pot. This way, you get to know if the pot’s size is ideal for it. The cactus shouldn’t be too deep into the pot nor too high up. And should leave just a bit of space between it and the pot – remember above? And, please don’t forget to watch for spikes. A pair of tongs or even cacti gloves will cover you.
  4. If all is good with the size, hold the plant centrally and fill up the remaining space with more potting mix.
  5. Firm the soil by pressing it gently. Add some more it goes down considerably but be sure to leave some watering space at the top.
  6. Give the plant its first shot of water.

Repotting a Cactus Plant

  1. Loosen up the soil in the pot by running a blunt knife or some other gardening tool in it. Be thorough at this to avert any possibilities of damaging the plant.
  2. Remove your cactus plant being careful not to come into contact with its pricks. Rolled up fun cactus bed sheets or a pair of tongs will do just fine for protection. In case the plant is quite huge, use a rolled up towel or actual gardening gloves.
  3. Rid the roots of large soil debris and see to it that you have individual roots separated from each other.
  4. Check the roots for any pests and diseases. Treat with appropriate chemicals. Also, nip off any dead ones.
  5. Prune the very large roots. Cutting these roots will help your plant grow with much more vigor.
  6. Allow the plant to dry out for up four days. This allows the roots that might have been hurt to heal hence eliminating any risk of rot.
  7. Follow the potting procedure above to install your plant in the ideal pot. But don’t water it yet. Give it up to a week before your first watering session.

After that, you can go back to your normal care routine.


Repotting your cactus plant is mandatory to maintain the ideal pot size. And as long as you’ve taken your plants through the above treatment, you should do so without a problem.

Thanks for reading our repotting a cactus plant article, we hope you learned something new today in order to avoid getting pricked by the spiky thorns on cacti. Let us know if you have any tips that we didn’t share below!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Top 5 Hanging Succulent Planters Worth Having

We think that hanging planters are one of the most underrated ways to display your succulents. Hanging planters add so much visual interest to living spaces and make your succulents a true focal point.

If you’ve never owned any before, you may be wondering where to buy hanging planters and what to put in them. We’ve got you covered! Just keep reading to hear all about our favorite hanging planters and succulents.

Which Succulents Look Good in Hanging Planters?

Trailing succulents are great for hanging planters because they spill and cascade down the sides of the planter. They give an abundant, lush look to any container you put them in.

Our favorite trailing succulents are Burro’s Tail and String of Pearls because they both have beautiful spherical leaves. Some other great choices are String of Hearts and Little Pickles. String of Hearts succulents have green and purple leaves that resemble hearts, and Little Pickles have green, spiky leaves and long, trailing purple stems.

If we were going to put an arrangement in our hanging planters, though, we wouldn’t just use trailing succulents. The key to making beautiful arrangements is contrast, so pick succulents that have different shapes, colors and textures to make your planters look more interesting. Here’s a list of 16 different types of succulents.

Succulent City’s Favorite Hanging Planters

We scoured the Internet looking for the best decorative planters, and this is what we found. We’ve included a few of our favorite DIY planters, too, just in case you’d rather save some money and make your own!

Macrame Plant Hangers

We love macrame plant hangers. They have a boho chic vibe and make any room you put them in look more eclectic.

These small macrame hangers are made out of durable jute rope. You can’t really hang them outside, but they look great indoors in bedrooms, living rooms and kitchens.

These hangers come in a pack of two for just $7.99, but you will have to purchase your own pots. We’d put small terracotta pots or textured white pots in these hangers, but any pot you have on hand will look great!

We love planters that incorporate natural materials, so these jute hanging planters are just our style. But if you’d rather make your own, you can fashion some plant hangers out of jersey fabric. All you need besides the fabric is a few household tools and thirty minutes. Get the full instructions here.

Striped Ceramic Hanging Planters

Striped hanging succulent planters
Via Amazon

We’re obsessed with stripes, so when we saw these planters, we knew we had to put them on this list! They come in a set of three for just $39.99, so they’re an absolute bargain.

These pots have beautiful stripes in earthy colors like rust and sage green. The stripes only cover about half of each pot, and the rest is painted white. This gives them a really clean, minimalistic look that will go with any decor.

These planters are suspended from durable cotton rope that won’t break. They have drainage holes, but come with plugs that you can use to stop the flow of water whenever you want. They’re ceramic and hand glazed, which we never would’ve expected at this price point!

We think that a Zebra Plant or variegated Snake Plant would look gorgeous in these planters. Any green succulent will look amazing, though, because it will pop against the white part of the planter.

Decorative Geometric Wall Planters

Geometric succulent wallplanter
@suspend.it

Some people might argue that wall planters aren’t true hanging planters, but since you hang them up on a wall, we’re including these geometric ones anyway! I mean, just look at them… we couldn’t leave them out.

These planters have a modern, geometric design that’s to die for. They come in packs of two for just $16.95.

Each planter has a unique gold frame that’s shaped like a diamond. It holds up a mini white pot that can house one small succulent like a Haworthia, Echeveria or Aloe plant. These planters would look great in bathrooms, hallways, or anywhere else in your home where you want a touch of greenery. 

Even though these wall planters are pretty cheap, you can save even more money by making your own. Our favorite DIY project actually uses coffee mugs as the planters and simple hooks to hang them on the wall. You can use coffee mugs that you already have in your home, but we think that these adorable cactus mugs would make this DIY even cuter!

Aqua Blue Mini Ceramic Planters

Aqua blue hanging succulent planters
Via Amazon

The rest of the planters on this list are pretty neutral, so we had to include a pop of color with these bright aqua mini planters. They come in white too, but we think you should take a chance and go with the aqua!

These planters are made of ceramic that has a beautiful shine to it. Despite being ceramic, they’re very lightweight. They come with twine rope that you can use to suspend them from your ceiling, which we definitely recommend doing. Their unique globe shape makes them look amazing when you hang them up high.

These planters also have drainage holes, which is a big plus. They come in a set of two for $21.99, which we think is a great deal for what you get.

These planters are on the smaller side, so we’d only put one or two plants in each one to avoid overcrowding. We love the way that bright green succulents look up against aqua, so we’d probably put a String of Pearls in one and a cactus in the other.

But colored succulents, especially orange ones, would look great in these planters too, so get creative and put whatever you want in them!

Round Metal Hanging Planter

Metal succulent hanging planter
Via Amazon

We’ve saved this one for last because it’s an absolute showstopper! This planter has a pretty gold pot, but that’s not what makes it special. The pot is encircled by a shiny gold hoop, so it looks more like a sculpture than a plant pot. It’s modern and elegant and everything we’ve ever wanted in a succulent planter. We’ve never clicked the “buy now” button so fast!

This planter isn’t just pretty—it’s functional and durable, too. Unlike a lot of decorative planters, this one has a drainage hole. Drainage holes are super important for succulent health because they can rot if they sit in too much water. You can rest easy knowing that’s not going to happen with this pot.

You’ll also be glad to know that this planter is durable enough for outdoor use. It’s made of sturdy metal materials and has an iron chain instead of a rope one, so it can withstand wind. No matter where you put it, this planter is guaranteed to be a conversation starter!


We hope that this post has given you plenty of hanging planter ideas!. We got a few new ideas, and a few new hanging planters—we couldn’t resist purchasing that stunning, gold circular one!

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Which planter is your favorite? Let us know in the comments below. Happy shopping, and happy planting!

Repotting Succulents— the Right Way

Whether you’ve been a succulent guru for the past ten years or you just purchased your very first succulent plant, knowing how to repot succulents correctly is crucial for long life. Below you will find a step-by-step process on how exactly to repot your succulent, so you can do it successfully. (And have some fun with it).

When Should You Repot Succulents

repotting succulents
Repotting Succulents@succulent.yinn

Here are a few reasons when you should repot your beautiful succulent plants like popular echeverias and lithops. (Here’s 16 other succulent types you can check out).

You bought a new succulent plant to add your collection.

When you purchase a beautiful succulent plant at your local store, they usually come in those small, cheap black plastic containers. (You know what i’m talking about). Not only do these plastic containers look hideous in your home, they also obstruct the growth of your succulent plant.

Make sure you repot your succulent after you purchase it with soil and potting mix that is nourishing for your succulent. You don’t want to wait too long before you repot it, I would safely say no more than 2 weeks. (1 week to be certain).

You have a gut feeling that when watering your succulent, it feels “weird” or “different”.

If your treasured succulent plant seems to dry out quickly shortly after watering it, thus requiring more frequency in watering, it can be a sign that you may need to repot your succulent. Sometimes the planter or pot you utilize may not allow for a good flow for the water to travel around the plant completely.

Also, if your succulent isn’t absorbing the water, this can be another sign that your pot is too small. If it’s too tight and cramped, your succulent won’t be able to full use it’s roots stress free. Consider a larger pot.

repotting succulents
gorgeous succulent arrangement @succycrazy

Your succulent looks like it’s outgrowing its pot.

If you succulent plant looks like it’s outgrowing the current pot that it’s in, do it a tremendous favor and repot it. (Succulents need room to grow just like you and I). If you see the roots growing out of the bottom of the planter or pot repot it.

Sometimes the plan looks squished within the current pot and this is another sign that you should repot your succulent plant so that it continues to grow healthy. It’s begging for a new home!

You don’t want to upset your succulent plant do you?

Plain and simple, you can’t remember the last time you repotted your flourishing succulent.

If it’s been days, weeks and then years since the last time you repotted (or remembered), this can be a telling sign that it’s time to switch things up.

It’s important to know that when considering repotting, it may not be necessary to actually make a change in the pot or planter itself. You may need to switch things up with the soil and placement rather than the pot or planter.

How Often Should I Repot Succulents

repotting succulents
Succulents @growingwithsucculents

All plants have a different time frames for when they mature out of their current pot, but most plants should be repotted in between 12 and 18 months. Though it’s ideal to repot your succulent plants every 12 to 18 months in order to keep it healthy, there are exceptions.

Some succulent plants can a few years in their planters or pots before it requires another change.

PRO TIP— Even if it’s technically not time to repot, make sure you regularly change out the soil. This is SUPER beneficial for the plant. Why? New soil has a bunch of crucial nutrients that the succulents need to survive and thrive! If the soil looks old, change things up a bit. (Change is good).

Spring is growing season for your indoor succulents. Fuel them up with a little more water and new soil. Watch them grow like the beautiful succulents you see on pinterest.

What Supplies Do I Need to Repot Succulents

A New Pot: Make sure it’s larger than the pot you’re transferring the succulent from and has a drainage hole at the bottom (very important). Spice things up a bit and get a fun new funky pot that your succulent and home will love.

New Soil: The nutrients from the new soil will make your plant thrive. Just like us, your succulent plants need rich soil (or food) to grow healthy and go about their daily lives.

A trowel: Don’t know what a trowel is? It’s that little baby shovel! Use it when removing the plant from it’s existing pot. If you’re repotting smaller succulents or propagating buds and seeds, be sure to use metal tweezers to help you plant them effectively and carefully. Learn how to successfully propagate your succulent plants here.

Coffee Filters : Use this to cover the drainage hole, it’s a great inexpensive solution aside from newspaper or the other materials you might use as a filter.

repotting succulents
repotting and propagating @succulentsuz

How to Repot Succulents

It’s time for the fun and action of this whole thing… I’m excited, are you?

The Prep Work: Make sure that a day or two before you plan on extracting the succulent from its existing pot, you water it frequently. Check the soil you will be using for the new pot and see if it seems a little dry. If it does, spray it a little bit with some water. Moisture is key in having a successful repotting process.

Step 1: Extract your succulent from the existing pot.

This step can sometimes be tricky, daunting even, but we promise it will be okay. Start by turning the plant sideways then grab the plant at the base of the stem. Tap the bottom of the container and shake it a little bit. If you have to, give the stem some nice and gentle pulls.

If your succulent plant is squished and there’s no way of safely removing the succulent plant out of the pot or planter, you might have to break it. Yes, you’d have to sacrifice the old planter for the new planter.

Gently hammer the planter not to hurt yourself in the process. Extract the beautiful and healthy succulent child you cared for deeply.

repotting succulents
adorable succulent set-up @cultivando_flores_plantas

Step 2: Root work.

Roots are obviously crucial to your succulent, so it’s important we take extra special care of them. If the plant’s roots look like they are tangled and knotted together in a bunch at the base of the plant, try to loosen them. Use your hands to loosen them! Feel free to give them a little trim too.  If you cut, tear, or even break some do not worry. This is not the end of the world. Just do your best to be careful and do this process cautiously, patiently, and calmly.

3. Removing & Replacing Potting Mix.

Remove about ⅓ of the existing old potting mix. Pour a layer of the new soil you bought, which is packed with nutrients that your succulents are going to love! Then place the plant on the new soil. Once you make sure that it’s centered, add more mix around the base of the plant until it sits straight up without you holding it. Make sure you do not put too much of the mix in the planter so that the roots can breathe!

You also do not want to put soil to the tippy top of the pot because when you try to water it, it will overflow and make a mess. (It happens to the best of us). 

4. Water your succulent.

Make sure you water your succulent well! This is a major problem if you don’t do it correctly. We wrote an article with over 2000 shares to help you understand how to water your succulents to be healthy and thriving.

Give it more water than usual, this is because it will drain through the entire pot and all of the soil.

repotting succulents
nautical succulent pots @curso_lembrancinhasplantas

There you have it! How to repot your succulent plants the right way. If you haven’t already be sure to check out our other articles, you’ll probably get a kick out of the 12 minimalistic succulent planters we have too. Or check out Air Plants vs Succulent Plants and Why is My Succulent Rotting to enhance your succulent knowledge!

Feeling inspired to own every succulent you can get your hands on?! (don’t feel bad, we do too) We have an awesome opportunity to fulfill your succulent dreams. Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today!

Thanks for reading, be sure to share your re-potting photos in our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge, where thousands of succulent lovers would love to see!

Enjoyed learning about Repotting Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about Replanting Practices to Keep Your Succulents Safe. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting! ?

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