How to Propagate Succulents Successfully

How to Propagate Succulents

It’s a lot more cost-effective to grow your own succulents. Fortunately, succulents naturally come equipped with an amazing ability regrow from leaves or branches… and that means free plants!

There are three primary methods of succulent propagation, each of them easier than the last!

Leaf Propagation

If you’ve ever seen leaf propagation in action, you probably understand at least part of the fascination surrounding succulents. People love taking pictures of their leaf props – and for good reason! Nothing is more satisfying for a plant parent than seeing a whole new succulent grow from a mere leaf.

It may seem that you need a green thumb to pull off this amazing feat, but nothing could be further from the truth. Propagating succulents from leaves is very easy. All you have to do is pull the leaf off.

… And you’re done! No, seriously, that’s all there is to it. If you remove the leaf, nature will take care of the rest. For the sake of thoroughness, however, I’ll add some details.

  1. It’s vital that you get a clean break when separating the leaf from the succulent. That means there should be no extra plant matter left on the leaf or stem. This isn’t difficult to achieve since succulent leaves don’t really need to be persuaded to fall off (looking at you, Ghost Plant).
  2. To ensure you get that clean break, grab the leaf close to the base and wiggle it gently from side to side. There shouldn’t be much “pulling” involved.
  3. Now that they’re separated, both the mother plant and the leaf have an open wound. You have to let it “callus” over (that’s the plant version of scabbing). Just set the leaf in a dry place and wait a week, a dish on the windowsill works great. (we highly recommend these propagation trays by Yield Lab). Don’t expose it to water during this period – that will slow or impair the callus formation and could allow bacteria or fungi to infect the succulent.
  4. Once the mother plant is callused, resume watering and treat it like normal. The leaf doesn’t need any special attention at the moment. Don’t water the leaf propagation until roots appear. It’s pointless since they can’t drink water without roots anyway. You may want to refer to our article about when you should water succulents if you need more information.
  5. You can put the leaf on dirt at any point, but don’t try burying it (or its roots). The succulent will take care of it.
  6. Once the roots show up, endeavour to keep them moist. Use a spray bottle to mist the leaf every couple of days. (Enter the quintessential, super affordable succulent tool kit). Keep the propagation in bright light so that the new growth doesn’t become etiolated (stretched out).

That’s pretty much it! It really is as simple as pulling the leaves and chucking them on some dirt. All of the nutrients, and most of the water, that they need is inside the leaf itself. After a few months, that leaf will shrivel up and fall off. Now you’ve got a whole new succulent for the cost of one leaf!

Be aware that this only works on succulents that have distinct stems and distinct leaves. Succulents like Echeveria, Sedum, Senecio, and Graptopetalum all make great candidates. If you try this with an Aloe or a Haworthia, for example, you’ll end up with a dead leaf and disappointment. Only do it if the leaf comes off easily!

Image by:@misucculents

 

Cutting Propagation

Anyone with a modicum of gardening experience will have used this technique before. It’s a trick as old as plants themselves. You cut off a part of a succulent and stick it back into the dirt and it just starts growing again.

Crazy, right?

Succulents have an even easier time of this than other plants. With herbs and veggies, you sometimes have to coax out new roots by putting the cutting in water for a while first, but that is not so with succulents.

Here’s how you propagate succulents via cuttings:

  1. Choose where to make the cut. It needs to be near the end of the branch or stem, usually 3 to 6 inches away is appropriate. You’ll also want to make sure that the plant is growing and healthy here – propagating a weak or dying plant is a recipe for failure.
  2. Clear the stem above the intended cut. Remove leaves one to two inches above the place you want to cut for two reasons: you’re going to put that part underground and also it makes it easier to get a good cut. Bonus tip – depending on the plant, you might be able to propagate succulents leaves!
  3. Make a clean cut perpendicular to the stem (the stem should be flat on top, not diagonal at all). Be sure to use really sharp, really sterile scissors. That part is important because dull scissors will crush the plant while cutting it, which makes it less likely to recover. Dirty scissors transfer germs directly into the wound – that’s no good. I highly recommend using gardening scissors or shears for this process. These gardening pruning shears by Vivoson are really really good!
  4. Allow the mother plant and the cutting to callus just as we did for leaves in the above technique. It should take between 3-10 days. Don’t let them get wet but keep them in direct light.
  5. Stick the bottom of the cutting into the dirt up to the place where the leaves start. Depending on the species of succulent, roots should start growing within a month and you can begin to water. There will be enough water in the plant already to sustain it until then.

We also recommend making sure you are using quality succulent soil. We highly recommend this soil mix by Bonsai Jack. It is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, it helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. 

VIVOSUN 6.5 Inch Gardening Hand Pruner Pruning Shear with...
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VIVOSUN 6.5 Inch Gardening Hand Pruner Pruning Shear with...
$6.99

Last update on 2021-10-07 / Amazon

In summary, snip off a bit of the succulent and stick it in the ground. It couldn’t be easier. This method only works with plants that have a pronounced stem, however. Sorry Aloe and Haworthia, that means you’re not eligible. Many of the plants we suggested for leaf propagation are also great choices here: Echeveria, Sedum, Graptosedum, Graptopetalum, etc.

This method is particularly useful because it addresses two problems:

  • It “fixes” etiolated plants. When plants have insufficient light and grow leggy, that can’t be undone. You can, however, snip out the leggy part and plant the top part again to have two plants – the base of the original (which will resume growth) and a cutting. Just make sure they get enough light this time!
  • It’s the fastest way to get new plants. Growing new succulents from leaves is easy and efficient, but slow. It could take up to a year to get a decent sized plant. Cuttings root and grow more quickly than leaf propagations (plus they start out bigger).
Image by: @growingwithsucculents

Budding Propagation

It’s finally time for Aloe to shine!

Ever notice how some plants just grow more of themselves? Sempervivum are famous for it – that’s why they’re commonly called Hens and Chicks. Haworthia do it too, as do Sansevieria. It’s a very common kind of propagation and not at all unique to succulents. It’s how grass gets around, too.

The baby plants are called “buds” or “pups” or “offshoots”. They usually grow out of the base of the mother plant and share a connected root system.

Propagating plants that reproduce through budding is a double-edged sword – on one hand, you literally don’t have to do anything at all, but on the other hand you have to wait for the plant to propagate on its own.

Being at the whim of your plants isn’t so bad, though. Keep them happy and healthy and buds should grow constantly throughout their growing season. Removing and replanting them is very similar to the process of take a cutting:

  1. First, you have to wait until they’re big enough to remove. It varies from species to species, but once they’re at least an inch or two in diameter (or several inches tall for the vertical variety of succulents).
  2. Find where the pup connects to the parent. It is probably either at the base of the primary stem or connected through a thick root called a “runner”. It’s okay to unpot the plant while you’re propagating it.
  3. Using the same technique we used for cutting propagations, make a clean cut where the bud meets the mother plant. If they share roots, give a generous portion to the baby when separating them. The mother plant can make more easily.
  4. Move the bud directly into a new pot, no need to wait for callusing this time. Still, you shouldn’t water it for a few days while it heals over.

Budding is also the way to propagate succulents like cacti, so you can use this method on them too!

 We hope you got some pointers on how to keep your plant family healthy! If you did, please take a moment to SHARE on Facebook or PIN US on Pinterest with the social buttons below!

Enjoyed learning about Propagating Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook titled The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully! With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll you have greater success with propagating! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Do you have any propagation tips or tricks? Share them with us in the comments below!

Thanks for reading!

If you enjoyed reading our blog about succulent propagation check out our other articles! Enhance your succulent knowledge with 6 Best Indoor Succulents, 6 Edible Succulents to Excite Your Taste Buds, or Household Items You Can use as Succulent Planters.

Are you looking for more propagation guides? You may want to take a look at our new ebook: The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully!

5 Tips for Propagating Succulents

Tips for Propagating Succulents

Propagation was our number one requested blog post article idea! (The polls on Instagram don’t lie) You asked us and we listened, continue reading below for our 5 tips to having a successful propagation process for your succulents.

Disclaimer: These are not all of the tips and tricks out there! These are just the tips that we wish we knew before our first propagation endeavor. (It was a nightmare at first). Feel free to let us know your techniques!

1. Some succulents are Easier to Propagate than Others

There are so many species of succulents out there and they all differ in difficulty when it comes to propagating. Three of the easiest succulents to have success with are: Kalanchoe daigremontiana (Mother of Thousands), Sedum morganianum (Burro’s Tail), and Sedum rubrotinctum.

Burros Tail Succulent Tips
Burro’s Tail Succulent Image: @done.by_hand_concrete

If you’re a beginner, we definitely recommend starting your propagation journey with these species! A lot of the time, the leaves of these succulents will fall down on their own and you can do the propagation process with them without accidentally cutting off too much of the leaf.

To learn more about this, check out “Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off”

2. Patience

Patience you must have my young “propagator.”

Yoda from Star Wars

Time to test your patience! Succulent propagation can sometimes take up to four to six weeks before the new leaf cuttings will begin to root. Remember, great things don’t happen in a day and this process is going to be worth it at the end.

When it is time for the ends of your clippings to dry out and harden, this alone can sometimes take up to a week, so make sure you don’t rush the process!

3. Watering Succulents

After the ends of the leaves have hardened over, it’s time to water them! Every leaf hardens over at different times. This is important to know because if you water them when they haven’t fully hardened, too soon after cutting from the mother plant, they’ll sometimes turn mushy and yellowish.

When propagating, here at Succulent City we spritz the leaves once a day. A quick spray over the top of all the leaves should be enough, not too close to them. Some leaves are going to look different than others, which is totally normal.

If you want to learn more about when you should water your succulents check out our in-depth article here.

4. Don’t Place the Clippings in Direct Sunlight

Succulents are desert plants and usually, they all need to be in direct sunlight for the majority of the day. This is true, but not with the succulent leaves during the propagation process.

I always put my leaves by a window that’s protected with some shade. Once the new plant has grown from the leaves, then they can be placed in direct sunlight.

ALSO READ:

Succulent Buds Sprouting
Succulent Buds Image: @peculiarshadelemontree

5. Don’t Get Discouraged

Remember that this can sometimes be a frustrating process. Not every single leaf will create a new plant. (Remember what Yoda said).

Don’t get discouraged if you don’t have a 100% success rate. Most of the time I usually only have about 50-70% success rate for all of the leaves I propagate.

Keep up with the process and try again! Practice makes perfect, even the “experts” don’t succeed with the propagation process each time.

Until next time! Oh and don’t forget to share the love down below.

Enjoyed learning about 5 Tips for Propagating Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the eBook about The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our eBooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

View our entire eBook collection here: SucculentCity eBooks

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know

Perhaps you’ve come across a hairy looking cactus plant with long stems that look like rat tails. Or perhaps not…

The popularity of rat tail (Aporocactus flagelliformis) cactus plant has grown more profoundly in homes than in the wild over recent years. They are actually almost termed as a threatened cactus variety in their native land of Mexico.

With the growing popularity, there is obviously a need to learn how to grow and care for them.

In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about the rat tail cactus plant— from its origin to how to care for it. If you have one passed down from a friend who also got it from a friend, here is an opportunity to learn.

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know
Rat Tail Cactus growing in the street @cactinaut

Disocactus Flagelliformis—the Rat Tail Cactus

The Rat tail cactus plant is scientifically known as Disocactus flagelliformis (L.) Barthlott. It belongs to the Disocactus genus of the Cactaeae family.

As far as where it’s from, the Rat tail cactus is a native of Mexico, just like many cacti. It is largely found in the southwestern and central parts of America. Learn more about the cacti community in Mexico by going here.

Rat tail cacti have a very distinctive look. The plant itself is green in color when young but turns to beige as it ages. It has long trailing stems that go as long as six feet at maturity and half an inch in diameter. Moreover, this is why they are often planted on hanging baskets or pots, kind of like this one we have in our office.

The stems have tiny reddish yellowhairy’ spines that can be trained into different forms and shapes.

Its flowers, which bloom in spring and early summer, are bright pink to red and sometimes pale pink or orange. They can grow up to two meters wide and 3 inches long. The flowers only grow and bloom for a few days and shade off. In some cases, they rarely even grow.

The stem’s grow is at a rate of about a foot every year.

In the wild, Aporocactus flagelliformis do not grow on soil. They either grow on other tree structures, rocky crevasses, and tree crotches or on top of the soil.

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know
a great gift @houseplantslove

The Right Conditions for Growing Your Rat Tail Cactus

The rat tail cactus, just like other cacti plants, does not require much attention or special growing conditions. With the right soil type and climatic conditions, your rat tail cactus should thrive.

Below are conditions that rat tail cactus will thrive best in:

Light Requirements

Given that this plant is adaptable to desert conditions it thrives best under direct sunlight. Therefore place your plant where it can access full and bright sunlight. You can take it outside when the weather is sunny and warm. If your house has not enough sunlight, you can use indoor LED plant lights to supplement the small amounts of natural light it can get.

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know
hanging out @plantsyall

Temperature & Climate

The best temperatures for rat tail cactus are between 45° to 50° degrees Fahrenheit but it can tolerate temperatures of up to 90° degrees Fahrenheit.  During the summer, early autumn, and spring the Rat Tail cacti do great at normal room temperatures. However, during the winter time, the rat tail cactus enters its dormancy stage and therefore you will need to relocate your plant to a place with cooler settings for it to rest.

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know
spread the cacti @ropeandroot

Best Soil to Grow the Rat Tail Cactus

The Rat tail requires rich potting soil to thrive best. Well-draining soil meant for cactus or succulents is most recommended for rat tail cactus. A perfect mixture of soil for this cactus would be four parts of loam, one part vermiculture and one part sand for drainage. Lining the pot or basket with organic materials, such as sphagnum moss, will help the cactus thrive even better.

We highly recommend this soil mix by Bonsai Jack. It is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, it helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. Go ahead and get the 7 Gallon Bag if you are plant nerd like us :). Pick up some of our favorite soil by clicking here: Bonsai Jack Succulent Soil.

Our Pick
We earn a commission if you click this link and make a purchase at no additional cost to you.
10/21/2021 09:24 pm GMT

How Much Water Does the Rat Tail Need?

Water your succulents regularly during their active growing season. You can then cut back on the watering as it matures. Reduce watering during Fall and don’t water at all during Winter unless you notice excessive drying of the soil. And even then, just water it very slightly-— just enough to dampen the soil.

Fertilizer Needs

Apply fertilizer onto the stems of the rat tail cactus every couple of weeks. Use a liquid fertilizer for ease of use. The liquid fertilizer should be diluted to a mild strength. Do not use any fertilizer on your cactus during the winter season!

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know
family gathering @appetiteshop

How to Successfully Propagate the Rat Tail Cactus

Propagating is the easiest way to quickly grow your rat tail cactus. They can grow from any of the six-inch stems.

You can either cut an entire stem into sections of an inch each or cut off the tip of a stem if you only need to plant a single cactus. For cutting, try these shears and see how they perform. Place the cuttings out in the air to dry for at least three days before potting.

To plant, poke the bottom end of the cuttings into the soil. Do not poke the cuttings too deeply into the soil, just about an eighth of an inch (2 cm) deep. You can use a stick to hold it firmly so that it doesn’t fall over. You should notice some root forming within two to three weeks of planting.

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know
indoor decorations @plants_everywhere

Repotting Your Rat Tail Cactus the Right Way

Since rat tail cactus grow pretty quickly, you are better off repotting them once every year but only after their active growing season and flowering.

Repotting greatly helps to replenish nutrients for a flagelliformis as it quickly uses up the nutrients. When repotting, the best basket size to use for a rat tail is a 9” – inch basket and the best pot size is a 6” – inch pot.

When the cactus overgrows the pot or the basket size, it is time to discard the overgrown plant. Before discarding though, propagate and start a new plant. You can reuse the pots you already have but you will need to thoroughly clean it first.

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know
repotting @shed_bkk

Common Pests and Diseases for Rat Tail Cactus

Rat tails have a high resistance to pests and diseases, however, they easily get attacked by red spider mites and a host of scale insects, so keep a pesticide nearby!

Spider mites are tiny almost invisible to the naked eye insects that cause damage to rat tail’s tissue. They do this by sucking up the sap from the leaves. You can easily spot them by their webbed nests. The best way to deal with spider mites is to immediately quarantine the affected plant as you treat it. Use a neem- oil- based insecticide If the infestation is heavy, otherwise just washing it under running water should suffice.

Scale insects are larger than spider mites so they can easily be spotted, as they are dome-shaped. Nevertheless, scale insects invade rat tail cactus by attaching themselves to their surface. Thus, to remove them you have to forcefully scrape them off or wipe off with a cotton swab dubbed in alcohol.

Another common concern for rat tail cactus is root rot. This is caused by overwatering or by poor drainage, so be sure you have this in check!

ALSO READ:

The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know
cactus selfie @smartplantapp

There you have it, everything you need to know about the Rat Tail Cactus plant.

Before we conclude (or forget), we wanted to share this awesome opportunity from Amazon, in honor of our recent partnership with the online- giant. For a limited time, Amazon is offering a FREE 30-day trial of their famous Amazon Prime Membership! Get full access to all the perks, including FREE 2-day shipping on all eligible products, which is perfect for all the new care items you’ll be stocking up on for your Rat Tail Cactus. Click this link to learn more and sign up today!

Want to continue expanding your succulent plant knowledge? Head over to our articles How to Successfully Grow Indoor Succulents and How Long Do Succulents Live.

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Thanks for reading, happy planting! ?

What is Proplifting? (Newbie Friendly Guide)

What is Proplifting - Newbie Friendly Guide

This word sounds so weird at first. Proplifting. What could it be? Well, it’s a pretty common thing nowadays, but the act is simple. If you look up the definition on Urban Dictionary, then you will get “The act of taking leaves or pedals fallen from succulent plants one doesn’t own, typically without permission, for the purpose of succulent plant propagation (creating new plants.)

This seems easy and harmless, right? Well, think again.

What is Proplifting - Newbie Friendly Guide
Succulent cuttings in palm @vernonfamilyplants

How to Proplift Properly?

You might be tempted to do this, so you need to know how it’s done because there’s a right and a wrong way. But that depends on where you want to take from mainly.

From a public area

If you are walking around in a park or something that is considered public space and the ones maintaining the plants are workers that are paid to do this, then your job is simple. You can pick up fallen parts or pick them straight from the plant. It’s okay as long as you don’t completely mutilate whatever you are trying to grow at home. You shouldn’t leave any succulent behind that barely looks like itself anymore.

Grab a flower or a leaf and take that entirely. But do this mindfully because, just like you, someone might want to grow it at home too.

From a plant reservation center

There are times when you see a pretty flower or a beautiful succulent while in someplace you shouldn’t take anything from. And that can break a plant lover’s heart.

But you can do something about it, all you need to do is go out of your way a bit. Go up to a guard or someone in the center’s office and talk to them. In a lot of cases, they will be able to permit you to take some petals or leaves home with you so you can grow that plant at home. The rules are there to prevent people from harming the flora withing the reservation center.

If you are completely honest with someone who works there and show them that all you want to do is preserve that life, then they will have no problem helping you.

Be sure you also go check out “How to Propagate Your Succulents Successfully” for more helpful info on propagating after proplifting.

From someone’s garden

This is the riskiest place of them all. Mainly because you need to go up to the owner and talk to them. And this will either turn out well, or you will be rejected. 50/50, there’s no way to know.

Many people spend a lot of time and energy keeping their plants alive, and thus, they don’t like people mutilating them. After all, how would you feel if someone went up to one of your plants (a stranger at that) and asked if they could tear a part of it off? It just sounds weird.

If you want to take some seeds home, then you need to ask in a particular way. “I’d love to have one of these at home, do you have any spare seeds?” Depending on the answer, you can follow up with a “Could I maybe get a leaf or a couple of petals to grow it from?” This way, you let them know your intentions, and you give them a chance to pick the specific part they take off.

But be prepared to get rejected. It shouldn’t hurt your feelings if someone doesn’t want to give you a part of their plant. It’s completely human to want to protect your seedlings.

Make sure you check out “Best Gardening Tools for Succulents” for a list of all the tools you need to gardening and propagating your succulent.

Why Should You Start Proplifting?

There are a lot of reasons why every plant lover should proplift. Although, make sure you have enough space for all these plants because even we have run into the trap of collecting too much.

The learning curve

The main reason is that this way you will start acquiring new plants that you don’t know much about. Because let’s be honest, if you knew about the succulent that you want to proplift, then you would already have it. But this way you see something you like and take it. You can learn the ropes later.

This provides a way for you to learn along the way instead of just looking everything up online. It’s way more fun to watch a plant grow, not knowing what’s going to happen next or what you need to know in the next life phase of it.

If you buy something in the store, then you already know the name of it. Then you will search for its’ needs and what pH, temperature, and shade it likes. And yes, it does make it easier. But easier most definitely doesn’t mean more fun.

Take a look at “8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower” for a list of succulents that bloom during season.

The price

This one is pretty obvious. If you go to a store or a market to get new plants, then you will spend money. There’s no going around it.

Although we know, seeds don’t cost that much, and if you want something of quality, then you shouldn’t be a cheapskate. Yeah, but have you counted how much you spend on seeds usually? That could be used for better soil or nutrients for your already grown plants. Because in reality, it’s not a huge amount, but it could still be used for other things.

Each time you proplift something, count it as a saved dollar. It will add up quickly if you pay close attention to your surroundings and try to find things you like.

Also, who doesn’t like free seeds?

Socialization

Asking for seeds is a great way to start talking to other plant lovers. It opens up the conversation to not only talk about that one given succulent but to also converse about others you two have. This works exceptionally well if you are asking this favor of your neighbor.

You will quickly find a friend that is equally as invested in growing plants as you. You need to put yourself out there.

Check out “How to Grow Succulents from Seeds” to see also a guide on growing succulents right from scratch.

ALSO READ:

What is Proplifting - Newbie Friendly Guide
A potted succulent @tinyfoliage

If you want all the benefits listed above, plus the happiness that comes with acquiring a completely new plant, then you need to start proplifting. If you do it the right way, then nobody will see you as a thief or a bad person, just as someone who has a love for succulents. It’s a perfectly fine thing to do, so don’t let people deter you with their judgment.

Have you proplifted before? What kind of plant was it? Tell us down in the comments below!

Make sure to check out related articles to improve your succulent knowledge like “Choosing the Right Pot for Your Succulents” or even “Thanksgiving Cactus – Schlumbergera Truncata“.

Enjoyed learning about proplifting succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “Essential Tools for Planting the Best Succulents“. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents. 

Happy Planting! ?

How To Propagate Succulents With Honey

How to propagate succulents with honey

How Do You Propagate Succulents?

As the natural habitats of succulents and cacti decline, the need to propagate and maintain these species in cultivation becomes increasingly crucial to their continued existence. Not only that but because growers and hobbyists who have tried to propagate succulents have found it very rewarding and attractive. Propagation has become part of the allure of growing these plants.

succulents with honey
How to propagate succulents? @Pinterest

There are several ways to propagate succulents. However, some species are easier to propagate than others. Although it takes a bit of trial and error to increase the probability of good results. In most cases, propagation is not difficult. Some of the most common ways to propagate succulents are:

Through Leaves

One of the most common ways to propagate silver is through its leaves. This is a method as simple as a leaf falling naturally to the ground. When this happens, it can likely root and grow into a new plant without any effort. We can also intentionally propagate through the leaves by carefully removing some of a healthy plant, then placing it in a pot with the proper substrate. You then wait for the leaves to take root and grow into a new plant. Generally, this method is done with several leaves at a time to increase the chances of successful propagation.

By Means Of Stem Cuttings

Propagation from stem cuttings is the most common and easiest way to propagate succulents in our home. When done correctly, propagating stem cuttings are more likely to give you a higher propagation success rate than propagating from leaf cuttings. Stem cuttings are taken from an existing plant then allowed to dry for approximately 10 days. After this time, the cuttings will begin to root from the cut end and begin to grow as a new plant.

Through Offsets Or Suckers

Not all succulents produce suckers, but all those that multiply on their own (hens, chicks, aloe, certain species of Haworthia, and some cacti) are suitable for reproduction through suckers. For this, we must carefully remove the young and the branches, place them in a suitable mixture for the pots, and start a new plant in that way. Eliminating suckers from the mother silver improves its health by focusing energy on the main plant’s growth rather than supporting its young.

By means of seeds

To harvest or sow our own seeds from an existing plant, we have to keep in mind that this takes a long time and is not the best route to follow if we want quick results for this process. However, it is one of the methods most rewarding when done successfully. The seeds can be harvested from the flowers of the plant. The flowers must be pollinated by pollinators, such as bees, or by self-pollination thanks to the wind. Another way to achieve self-pollination can be by using a brush to pollinate the flowers ourselves.

If all goes well, fertilization will occur. The flowers can be dried and stored. This way, seed crops can be made. The harvested seeds must have the right environment to germinate into seedlings. The germinated seedlings will be ready to transplant and treat as new plants once they reach a sufficiently developed size. Instead of harvesting your own seeds using self-pollination, we can buy seeds from a garden store or nursery and germinate them ourselves.

Using honey for succulent roots

Succulents, thanks to their scant care and few needs, attract a very diverse group of growers. For many of them, growing succulents may be their first experience with growing any plant in general. Consequently, some tips and tricks have emerged that other gardeners may not be familiar with, such as using honey as a rooting aid for succulents.

Rooting succulents with honey

As mentioned above, unconventional methods can help us when growing succulents. One of these being using honey to encourage rooting. Honey has healing properties and is used to help with some medical conditions. It is also used as a rooting hormone for plants, thanks to its properties. Honey contains antiseptic and anti-fungal elements that can help keep bacteria and fungi away from the succulent leaves and stems that you are trying to propagate. Even growers claim that by dipping the succulent propagation pieces in honey, it stimulates the roots and new leaves on the stems.

If curiosity gets the better of us and we decide to try this honey method as a rooting aid, we must use various raw honey that is as pure as possible. Many derived products have very high amounts of added sugar and are closer to being syrup than honey. Something important that we should also take into account is that those products that have gone through the pasteurization process. They have probably lost the elements that can make them valuable when using them as rooting enhancers. To avoid any confusion or inconvenience is to carefully read the list of ingredients before using any product to test this peculiar theory. This product does not necessarily have to be the most expensive. The really important thing is that it is as pure as possible.

Does using honey for succulent roots work?

Despite being a method used, and there are even some detailed tests about the use of honey as an aid for the rooting of succulent leaves, there is no certification of any kind on this method’s authenticity. None of these tests affirms to be professional or conclusive. Many of the times this method was applied, very little difference was noticed in the growth of the roots of the plants.

However, on several occasions where this unorthodox method was used, a leaf was found that made a baby grow instead of sprouting roots first. This action was credited to the use of honey as it is the only different factor that was applied. This alone is reason enough to give it a try. We would all like to get to that point faster when we are dealing with the propagation of succulents from leaves.

Plant growth recipe with honey

Thanks to the fact that it is a method that many growers are still testing, it is likely that we will find many recipes around the internet, all of which are equally valid when selecting which one to use. That said, it is best to experiment with several of them to find one that works well for us and can give us the best possible results in our cultivation.

How to root cuttings with honey?

If we really want to try and see if it is possible to increase the effectiveness of the rooting of our succulent using honey, the first thing we should do is prepare the cuttings and the pot with their respective substrate. Your cuttings that we choose from the plant should be 6 to 12 inches long and cut at a slant angle of about 45 °. After this, we must submerge each cut in the honey mixture and then paste them directly on the substrate prepared in our pots. Cutting honey has been proven to be effective using a wide variety of potting substrate options, including soil, water, and even rock wool.

Tips to start using honey for rooting

Use the entire leaf of the plant. When propagating from cuttings, keep it right side up.

When planting our leaves or stems, we must make sure to submerge them adequately in, or on top of, our soil, it is best if it is sandy and moist but not wet.

We should place our cuttings in a location where they are covered with abundant bright light, but they mustn’t be in direct sunlight.

Keep them outside when temperatures are warm or indoors during colder temperatures, it is important to take care of our cuttings from temperature damage, especially in winter and if we live in cold and humid areas.

Succulent propagations are slow to show activity, which requires your patience. We must be calm and patient and observe our future plant’s progress in a calm way.

When applying honey to the cutting, some growers can advise us to water the honey, putting two tablespoons in a cup of warm water. Others dip the cutting directly into the pure honey and plant it. Neither method is proven to be more effective to try both and decide which one is more effective when it comes to the growth of our succulent plant and its roots.