How To Care For Indoor Succulents During The Winter

The cold season means a change in the way you take care of those babies. Reason? Your succulents’ needs have changed. Sticking to what you’ve been doing all year round will put your plants’ survival in jeopardy. Certainly, you don’t want this. No succulent lover wants their plants getting a hit from the cold.

Keep reading to find out how you can care for your indoor succulents in the winter.

How to Care for Indoor Succulents During the Winter
Potted succulent plant @cosas_de_crasas

What Winter Brings With It

Before delving into the care regimen you’ll need during this season, it’s essential to have at least an idea of why the needs of your succulents change. In other words, how the low temperatures affect the plant itself and the surrounding conditions.

First off, a good deal of indoor succulents have varying growth patterns during this time of the year. That means some of them will be:

  • Actively growing – the needs will remain constant; hence, you can keep on with usual care routine. HaworthiaAloe, and Aeonium are some of the indoor jewels that keep growing in winter.
  • Partly dormant – the plant is still growing but a slower rate. That means you have to reduce necessities like water and fertilizer.
  • Or fully dormant – the plant has completely stopped growing. You may have to withdraw or reduce by a significant amount of the growth requirements. For instance, watering can be only once or twice for the whole winter season and no fertilizing at all.

Secondly, a couple of natural growth requirements become scarce, light being the most prominent one. That calls for additional steps to try and maintain those optimal growth conditions. And the other steps are exactly what we’re going to look at.

Make sure to also check out our similar piece “How to Care for Succulents in the Winter” to see different kinds of tips to taking care of your succulents during the cold weather.

Caring For Your Indoor Succulents In Winter – 5 Simple Steps

Grab yourself the following winter care guideline to keep your indoor succulents beaming with life during this not-so-nice season.

1. Sort out your succulents

If you’ve been raising succulents for some time, you may have a collection of different plant types. And as it is, each one of these is going to have its unique requirements, especially in terms of light and temperatures.

It’s possible to find several succulents with common needs. Use this criterion to group your succulents. This makes it easier for you to give each of the plants a dose, albeit a reduced one, of the elements of life.

Additionally, it helps to avert any mishaps that may doom the existence of your plant – like fertilizing a dormant plant and reducing watering for an actively growing succulent.

By the way, an easy way of grouping your plants will be using the growth patterns. So you put the actively growing ones (the AloesAeonium, and Haworthia) in one group and the rest (that is partly and fully dormant) in another.

This just one way of going about it. Be sure to look at each plant’s needs and see what you can come up with.

2. Identify the brightest spot in your house for the succulents

Naturally, there is much less light indoors, and winter only makes the situation worse. So you should pay attention to the light aspect to keep those babies in good shape – even if some of them aren’t growing.

This will be relatively easy if you’ve made an effort to group your plants as per their requirements – light in this case. Some succulent types like the HaworthiaSenecio, and Crassula can still do fine in low light. So you’ll be on the right to dedicate these to a spot that isn’t that much lit.

For those that require more light, reserve the brightest spot in the house for them. This will most likely be a sunny window. And while at it, be sure to rotate the pots regularly so that the rays hit the plant all around. This prevents both stretching and discoloration.

But sometimes the brightest window might not also cut it in shining enough light on your plants. The number of hours the sun is up can be quite little – less than 3 hours per day.

In such a case, a grow light will be your savior. Grab one ASAP and have your succulents soak up those rays – and keep your interiors beaming with plant life.

But…

Don’t let the lights on throughout the day. Take care of your indoor succulents by providing about 8 hours per day for them to thrive. A full 24 hours of light will interfere with the growth patterns, and hence the health of the plant. Those few hours of darkness every day are also beneficial.

Check out our article “How to Successfully Grow Indoor Succulents” to see our guide to growing the succulents.

How to Care for Indoor Succulents During the Winter
Succulents at a bright spot of the house @j.l.perrone

3. Be vigilant about pests

This would be a regular thing for all seasons. But considering the conditions that come with winter, it’s very important to heighten your lookout. The season brings with it some particularly favorable surroundings for pesky little invaders.

Picture this: as you strive to keep your house warm by utilizing that fireplace, you’re creating just what mealybugs love. So you’re indirectly inviting these pests to take a bite of your babies. Should you then brave the cold to protect your plant from attacks? Of course not. Get to know what to do in a minute.

Another contributing factor to pest infestation is the generally calm nature of the indoors. Pests love this and quickly jump in to draw some juices. The solution here is to instigate an artificial airflow – by blasting fans and opening windows.

But if it turns out that several of your plants are attacked, the standard procedure of curbing these insects applies.

The first step is to separate the affected succulents to control any further spread of these agents of destruction. The next step will depend on the extent of the pest attack. If they’re just a few mealybugs (or any other houseplant pests), dabbing them with a cotton swab dipped into dilute rubbing alcohol is all you need.

For significantly larger attacks, you might have to use a spray bottle. Alternatively, you can use a water jet to wash off the insects.

Make sure you also go check out “Succulent Leaves Changing Color? Find Out What That Means” to see if your succulents changing colors is a good thing or bad.

4. No fertilizer

That is for winter dormant types. Fertilizer is only useful as long as it’s getting utilized. And when your succulents have put growth on hold, there is every chance that it won’t get used – even if it gets absorbed.

This has the same effect as excessive water – it leads to your plant rotting. Only that the rot here will pick off from the leaves as they become soft due to fertilizer accumulation.

You should fertilize your plants near the end of the summer as they prep to enter dormancy.

5. Cut back, significantly, on watering

Succulents need even less water when the cold season kicks off. Firstly because the plants’ rate of growth is zero. Even in the partially growing ones, growth is significantly slowed down. Consequently, the rate of water intake is also slow.

But most importantly, the soils are taking much longer to dry out. As pointed out above, in the enclosed interiors, air circulation is greatly hampered. As such, the rate at which water evaporates from the potting mix is very slow.

This can be a major problem for your plants if you maintain the same watering routine. In winter, watering every once to twice a month is fine.

Or you can let the top part of the potting mix guide you. As usual, water when it is dry 1-2 inches down.

Don’t miss out on our ebook “The Correct Way to Water Succulents” to see our full guide to watering your succulents during all seasons.

How to Care for Indoor Succulents During the Winter
A succulent growing in a white planter @itsjustmejenp

Thank you for reading with us today! Need some options for picking your succulents for your garden? Be sure to read “Summer & Winter Succulents: What’s the Difference?” for succulent picks hardy enough for winter.

Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor” “Different Types of Planters” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complimentary guide.

Happy Planting! 🌵

How Big Do Air Plants Grow?

Ever walk into a room and noticed little plant-like decorations? You ask the host where you can get a piece or two to decorate your home, and they mention that they are actual plants. If you are not familiar with the Tillandsia plants, you would probably think they are pulling your leg. These Air plants grow without soil, how?

It is quite perplexing to a newbie who has no idea how air plants survive. They can live without soil, as a matter of fact, the dirt will suck the life out of these extraordinary beauties. The atmosphere around them supplements their every nutritional need- food, air, and sunlight.

These cuties come in differing colors, shapes, and sizes that make them favorable to place on whatever staging you wish to. Be it on a geometrical model, a hung metallic frame or a simple glass tabletop terrarium. You may even include one variety or two as part of your fairy garden. However, for this to be possible, you have to familiarize yourself with the exact size each grows so that you know the best location to place them. Every species germinates from a seed, then a seedling, then a fully grown plant. But the question we are to answer today is how big do they grow? And the best way to do so is to take a look at the largest kinds in the Tillandsia family.

How Big Do Air Plants Grow
Grow Your Air Plants @m.o.m.o_sapiens

Bulbosa

This air plant has long wave-like dark green tendrils that originate from the bulbose base and meander outwards. The thin flat leaves give the crop a striking resemblance to an under the sea creature because of their unique winding nature that grows freely in all directions. The leaves at the base of the plant are usually highlighted with an attractive hue of plum and will yield a bright red bloom and bright violet petals when it flowers.

This crop marks its origins on the wild sides of the Caribbean basin and Central America. It loves the humid air found in such regions. These Bromeliad epiphytes use their tiny roots to anchor themselves on any surface. They are therefore found growing on trees and rocks where they get plenty of direct shaded light.

A full-grown Tillandsia Bulbosa produces large bulbous bases that can range between 2 to an astounding 9 inches in circumference and 18 inches in height. Their narrow, curled up leaves can spread to a length of 8 to 10 inches.

Due to their larger size as compared to other air plants, they do best when grown in open structures such as open frames and unconstricted containers.

Make sure to check out “7 Rare Air Plants You Need in Your Home” to see a full list of rare airplants for your home.

Caput Medusa

If you are familiar with the Greek mythological story of medusa, you will recall that her head was filled with live snakes. And this air plant appears as this name suggests. The snake-shaped green leaves bring an exotic flair on any surface this crop is placed.

The Caput Medusa acts as an ant-plant in the wild, where it provides a habitat to the small animals. And in return, the ants keep the plant safe by repelling pests and providing a natural fertilizer by means of their feces. When grown domestically, they do enjoy the brightly lit spots that receive filtered bright light. This air plant loves humid air, and that is why it prefers being sprayed as opposed to being soaked in water.

A mature Caput Medusa’s grey-blue, snake-shaped leaves grow to a stature of around 9.8 inches. This air plant would look divine located on a shell decoration or laid on a wooden saucer as centerpiece art.

Take a look at “5 Types of Air Plants” to see other types similar to the caput medusa you can get for your home.

How Big Do Air Plants Grow
Medusa is Growing @chengjit

Circinata

The Tillandsia Circinata is a sturdy, light fuzzy green stalky air plant with a lot of character. This air plant has trichomes covering the leaves, and they help the plant acquire nutrients from the air. During its blooming season, the crop grows strikingly bright yellow or purple flowers that are a great attraction to bees and hummingbirds.

Tillandsia Circinata traces its original habitat in the countryside of Mexico, Costa Rica, the Bahamas, and the southern united states.

This air plant grows to an approximate width of 1 inch at the base and around 7 to 9 inches in height. The Circinata looks wonderful mounted on driftwood.

Don’t miss out on “Your Ultimate Guide on How to Care for Air Plants” for our full guide to taking care of your air plants.

Juncea

This grass-like species is native to the west indies, Mexico and Central America. This Tilly looks fantastic in a hanging planter or a simple tabletop planter. It has a very memorable fan-like leaf structure that grows to a height of about 12 to 18 inches. It is perhaps one of the biggest air plants found. Although, there are smaller versions of this crop that grow to a height of about 5 to 7 inches and 8 to 10 inches.

It is an extremely hardy plant that forms a clump over time, but before then it blooms charming royal purple flowers. It does well under brightly filtered lights, a low- moderate watering regime and an easy-going maintenance schedule.

Learn how to take care of your air plants and check out “Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?” for tips on maintaining them.

Xerographica

The xerographic air plant is a striking air plant that has a bright mossy green coloring on the gently gathered leaves. It is perhaps one of the most beautiful large air plants that look beautiful placed as it is. With or no container, it is a sight to behold. The leaves grow and curl inwards towards itself, forming a bowl-like shape. The leaves are thicker at the base and extend into thinner streams.

It relishes direct sunlight in the summertime. Its watering is not so time-consuming as one may either do a frequent misting or soak it in water for fifteen minutes at least once a month.

The seedling alone volumes 2 to 4 inches and the jumbo matured one measures 8 to 10 inches. And with proper care, the Tilly’s size can multiply three times over. The fascinating thing about this air plant is its bloom. Its sensational floweret can be an astounding four times the plant’s height. For this reason, the Xerographica makes an incredible centerpiece for any table.

Be sure you also go check out “5 Benefits of Succulents” to see some benefits of having a succulent in your home.

How Big Do Air Plants Grow
Fascinating Air Plant @sirenofsucculents

Contrary to belief, air plants can actually grow to super and jumbo sizes. Evident from the sorts mentioned above. And just like their smaller counterparts, they still look amazing!!

Thank you for reading with us today! Enjoyed learning about how big do air plants grow? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “Rare Succulents You Wish You Knew About“. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy Planting! 🌵

Totem Pole Cactus (Pachycereus Schottii Monstrosus)

Cacti are probably the most popular succulents we have around. Remember the days when cactus and succulent were used synonymously?

Thank God, we know better now.

We know cacti are part of the larger succulents group and the two are not interchangeable. Succulents are diverse with a ton of individual plant types – and cacti are part of this diversity.

Further on, the cacti have a diverse background. There are so many cacti species. Any three you know of?

Well, here’s the fourth one: the totem pole cactus.

Have you seen it? Heard about it maybe? Or this is your first time?

Whatever the case, you’ll have more than a handful of information about this yet another wonder from the succulent kingdom. Read on.

Totem Pole Cactus Pachycereus Schottii Monstrosus
A thickly stemmed cactus @succulentsontheside

Totem Pole Cactus

Lophocereus schotii var. monstrosus is the name the totem pole cactus goes by in the botanical world. It is yet another beauty that goes against the usual spiny – and sometimes dangerous – nature of a majority of cacti.

Its entire height, which can be as high as 12 ft, is covered by a series of tiny spineless bumps – a characteristic brought about by mutation. But if it grows to maturity, you’re bound to see traces of its past spiky glory.

At full height, it bears sharp grey spikes at the stem tips.

Native to the Mexican state of Baja California, the totem pole cactus is green and flowers only occasionally. The blooms are pink and open during the night – so probably you’ll never see them. They come out in summer.

Be sure to also check out “What Is Special About A Cactus?” to see more features on the cacti species and what makes them so special.

Totem Pole Cactus Pachycereus Schottii Monstrosus
A young cactus @artslug_

Totem Pole Cactus Care

This cactus is pretty easy to nurture. It’s a set-and-nearly-forget type of plant.

As long you have a few pieces of the puzzle in place, you’ll have your plant for as long you wish — the most important details to pay attention to include watering, potting mix, and lighting.

Very paramount also is your area’s USDA hardiness. This will determine whether you’ll grow your totem pole cactus as an outdoor plant or an indoor one.

Have a closer look at each one of these below.

1. Ideal climate – outdoor or indoor growth?

The totem pole cactus is ideal for both outdoor and indoor growth. But there’s no denying – it’s such a darling with outdoor growth. This could be attributed to its rather imposing physique.

The bad news is that not every area will be suitable for growing this beauty piece outside, at least not all year round.

Places that experience a warm climate can accommodate the totem pole cactus in the open quite well. And that is throughout the whole year. In terms of hardiness zones, we’re talking of areas with values from 9 to 11.

For cooler parts, you can still grow your plant outdoors. But it should be in a container so that you bring it inside as the cold months approach.

Be sure to also check out our guide “How to Successfully Grow Indoor Succulents” for more info on growing indoors.

2. Lighting for the totem pole cactus

The totem pole cactus cherishes the sun, so much. That means you should make sure it’s getting as much of it as possible – not a few hours, we’re talking a full day here.

This is fairly simple if you’re growing this succulent in a garden – assuming your climate is ideal for such. All you need is a clear spot devoid of any shade.

For indoors, place your plant near the window receiving the most hours of sunlight throughout the day.

Anything partial and your plant won’t be as impressed with its growth.

Don’t miss this opportunity to take away our ebookBest Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth” for our full guide to taking care of your succulents with the best lighting practices.

3. Totem pole cactus watering requirements

This is a drought-tolerant plant. A few prolonged periods of not quenching it isn’t much of a bother.

Nevertheless, you still need to be watering your baby – and your frequency will depend on whether you’re raising it in a container or out there in the garden.

Indoors, it’s best to wait at least two weeks between watering and a week when the plant is outdoors, in the ground. These are the rough timelines during which the soil would have dried up.

If you can’t keep with counting the days (it’s only natural) then simply checking whether the top part of the soil is dry or not will do just fine. You want to make sure that the soil has completely dried out before heading for your watering can.

The frequency will also be influenced by seasons. You’ll need to water your plant often during, say, a heatwave and much less when the temperatures tumble. The trick is in keeping an eye on the topsoil.

Sometimes you may even overwater your cactus. For that, check out our piece “5 Dangers Of Overwatering A Cactus” for tips on salvaging your succulent.

4. Soil requirements

The above watering requirements will only make sense if you have the right soil in place for your totem pole cactus.

As it is the norm with succulents, make sure the soil you put your plant in is well-draining. It just ensures your plant is getting the scarce water conditions it’s used to in the wild. And that’s how you end up with a truly ornamental possession.

Learn how to make your own succulent soil in “How to Make Your own Succulent Soil at Home“.

Totem Pole Cactus Pachycereus Schottii Monstrosus
Close up of a cactus @crazy_plant_guy

Totem Pole Cactus Propagation

Getting new totem babies is possible through stem cuttings. And the whole process is a piece of cake.

Here’s a cheat sheet for going about it:

  • Identify a stem with a few healthy bumps and cut it off, a few inches from the tip, using a sharp, sterilized knife. Make sure your cut is at an angle to prevent water accumulation on the parent plant.
  • Treat the wounds on both the remaining stem and the cutting using scouring powder to prevent infections. This is optional, but it’s always good to be proactive.
  • Store your cutting away from direct sunlight, giving it just enough time for the cut part to callus. This takes a few weeks.
  • Now it’s time to stick your cutting in a well-draining mix.
  • Give your cutting a few days before you start watering. Follow the watering routine outlined above and keep it away from direct sunlight.
  • The roots will form between 2 to 6 weeks, and you’ll have a new plant to look out for. At this point, you can start to gradually increase the exposure to sunlight and follow the above caring tips.

Check out more tips on propagating by taking a look at “5 Tips for Propagating Succulents“.

Totem Pole Cactus Pachycereus Schottii Monstrosus
Succulent planted in a black planter @soitgrows_

Pests and Problems

The totem pole cactus is a hardy succulent. Sure, it can go for long periods without water– like all succulents. But what sets it apart is its resistance to pests and diseases. So you shouldn’t worry at all on those fronts.

What you want to keep tabs on are your watering and the soil mix. Root rot is still a major nightmare here. Refer to the caring requirements above.

Totem Pole Cactus Pachycereus Schottii Monstrosus
Top view of a potted succulent @nicoleska665

There is no shortage of places when it comes to buying a totem pole cactus. The most no-brainer options are Amazon and Etsy.

Aside from these e-com giants, there are many enough options that are even better since their sole focus is on succulents. Check out the full list in this post. Check out this totem pole cactus we found online just for you!

Thank you for reading! Be sure to check out more from the cacti species by checking out “Blooming Beauty: Moon Cactus (Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii)” or even “Cottontop Cactus – Echinocactus Polycephalus“.

If you liked this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read. 

Happy Planting! 🌵

Cutest Succulents: Living Stones (Lithops)

A touch of character with an element of surprise is what you can expect from living stones. These little succulents known as Lithops plants are small and absolutely adorable. Lithops is both a singular and a plural, so don’t go searching for a Lithop if you want one.

Typically, they grow to about an inch above the surface of the soil. The rest of the plant is underground. They appear unassuming, often split into a cloven shape. In fact, if you do not know what to look for, they will be easy to miss. Living stones have two leaves that are thick and padded. They are the masters of camouflage which is how they have earned their name. Numerous colors, spots, and little stripes can be found on the upper surface of the leaves. There are at least 145 different types to choose from. Their resemblance to stones is uncanny.

These cute succulents originate from South African deserts, where they can easily grow amidst sand and rocks. They do best in areas where the weather is exceptionally hot and needs very little water.

Cutest Succulents Living Stones Lithops
Surprising Item @maceplants

Unique Features of The Living Stones

It would be a challenge for anyone to kill this plant, even if one does not have a green thumb. It all comes down to nutrients and water, which this plant barely requires. Very little is lost from the surface area of this succulent as most of it is underground. Having only two leaves also minimizes the surface area of the plant. In fact, some Lithops can grow and stay alive with fog or mist being the primary source of moisture.

The Lithops have no stem, and the leaves are like storage tanks for the plant. It is the leaves that ensure that the plant can stay without water for months. When experiencing a drought, these plants are able to stay alive by shriveling and shrinking below the soil level. When the succulent seeds, these seeds can remain viable for months since they need minimal moisture.

Cutest Succulents Living Stones Lithops
Unique Characteristics of Living Stones @idrenpeachpoo

Growing Your Cute Succulents

The sandier the soil, the better if you want your Lithops to thrive. These plants are light lovers. Bright sunlight is ideal. Full-on exposure won’t damage them, though a little shade in the afternoon is advised. If you want to keep them indoors, you should make sure they are close to a south-facing window so that they can get the most light. Four to five hours of direct sunlight is what they need each day.

If you start out with your Living Stone succulent indoors, you should not transplant it to grow outdoors later. This is because being indoors makes them lose resistance to bright light. If you move them outdoors, the leaves of these cute succulents will burn, and they will die. During the winter, ensuring that these plants have adequate access to light should be a priority.

Check out this guide on “How to Successfully Grow Indoor Succulents” for a guide on growing your Living Stones indoors.

The most surprising and endearing feature of this plant is its flower. Flowering happens in autumn or in early winter. The flowers are in various colors including pale orange, yellow and white. They resemble daisies, looking like small clusters of perfect bouquets on the ground. The unique feature of these flowers, they are only open in the afternoon when it is sunny and hot. When it gets cooler, towards the late afternoon going into the evening, the flowers close up. With some varieties of these cute succulents, the flowers are scented. They come out from the space between the two leaves.

Once flowering has completed, a new phase of life begins for these succulents. They go through dormancy, where the old leaves are reabsorbed, and new leaves develop. In some cases, a new cluster will appear.

Enjoying learning about the Living Stones succulent? Be sure to also check out “7 Succulent Bouquets You Wish You Knew About” for a look at succulents you can use at your wedding! Check it out!

Cutest Succulents Living Stones Lithops
Grow Your Living Stones @succulents.ireland

Keeping Living Stones

When keeping them, ensuring that the conditions are as close as possible to their natural environment is what you should aim for.

Succulents typically require minimal watering, and only when their soil has dried out. These succulents require even less water. Between the fall and spring, they should not be watered at all as this is when they are dormant. They have a yearly cycle of growth.

This is one succulent that can stay within a family for generations, living up to 50 years if they are grown outdoors in ideal conditions. When indoors, they can be grown in the same pot for up to 20 years.

Thinking of using grow lights for your succulents? Be sure to check out “Are Grow Lights Bad for My Succulents” and see if it’s safe to continue using these lights.

Cutest Succulents Living Stones Lithops
The Natural Surroundings @im.juyoung

Some Interesting Facts On the Living Stones Succulent

Here are a few interesting facts about this plant.

  • When looking to purchase these plants, there are several names they go by. Look for flowering stones, mimicry plants or even pebble plants too.
  • There is a theory that they look like stones to protect themselves from being eaten by grazing animals in the wild.
  • They grow best in groups and surrounded by small pebbles.
  • Roots need room for growth, so pots should be at least five inches deep.
  • These plants are non-toxic, ideal to have around children and pets.
  • It can grow well without any fertilizer.
Cutest Succulents Living Stones Lithops
Lithops @nannileslie

Thank you for reading with us today! Let us know in the comments below which kind of succulents you have laying around the house. Do you have the Living Stones succulent yet?

Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complimentary guide.

Happy Planting! 🌵

Elephant Bush – Portulacaria Afra

Elephant Bush is opulent and larger than life. Also known as the Portulacaria Afra, this is a succulent that grows into a bush. It is a part of the Didiereaceae family. Its unique feature is in its ability to grow to amazing heights. It has stems that appear woody in nature with small leaves all along with them. These stems are also bendy, making these plants ideal for using in hanging baskets.

Lots of space is needed for this succulent, especially if you want it to achieve its maximum growth. It can grow up to 12ft tall. Wondering how this succulent got the name Elephant Bush? It had little to do with its ability to reach such great heights. In its native South Africa, this plant has been food for elephants. In the wild, it can exceed the height of 12ft, with some being recorded as reaching even 20ft. It is found in places that are rocky and dry, on slopes.

Not to worry, when growing it indoors, it only grows a few feet tall. It is also non-toxic to people and animals. Since it is flexible in look and feel, being able to fit a hanging basket, it is an ideal ornamental plant.

Elephant Bush - Portulacaria Afra
One of The Most Famous Indoor Succulent @dwarfjadebonsai

Features of The Elephant Bush

The main features of the Elephant Bush are the stems and the leaves. The stems are dark brown in color, with the leaves being small and green.

In the wild, this plant blooms with flowers in clusters. These are normally a range of colors, including white, purple and pink. However, when cultivated, it is exceptionally rare for Elephant Bush to flower. The only way to achieve this result is to ensure that the conditions are exactly the same as its native habitat.

Elephant Bush plants are lovers of light, requiring some extra thought if they are to be kept indoors. They need to be kept close to the windows so that they can benefit from both light and warmth. This is best achieved with a south-facing window where it can get at least six hours of light each day.

When keeping this plant, it is advised that you leave it in one location. It can get damaged when moving from indoors to outdoors. This is because of exposure to direct sunlight. When it is not used to this exposure, the leaves can quickly burn outdoors. This plant is able to survive in cold temperatures since it is tolerant to frost. However, in the event of snow, you may want to move your plant indoors.

Make sure you also check out “Why Succulents Grow Tall and What to Do About it” for more info on seeing why certain succulents grow this way.

Elephant Bush - Portulacaria Afra
Characteristics of The Elephant Bush @dwarfjadebonsai

Propagating Your Elephant Bush Succulents

To grow your own Elephant Bush, propagation can give excellent results. Starting out in the spring or early summer will ensure excellent results.

All you need to do is plant a cutting that has been dried out and calloused. The soil should be moist. Once planted, in a few weeks, a new Elephant Bush will have taken root.

The weather where you are propagating will influence how you water your plant. If the area is humid, then use minimal water. If the plant is not exposed to constant and consistent sunlight, then you can use less water as well. Also, be aware of rain so that if it does rain while you are propagating, you resist watering your plant as this could affect the roots causing rot.

Want more info on root rot on succulents? Check out our piece “What is Root Rot & How Do You Fix it?” and learn techniques on how to fix this problem.

Quick Tips to a Thriving Elephant Bush

Keeping your Elephant Bush in the best possible health requires the following:

  • Consistent exposure to sunlight, with partial shade for protection
  • Use a stake to help keep the plant stable as it grows bigger
  • Sandy soil with extra perlite will help elevate drainage
  • Potted Elephant Bush should be repotted every two years

If you are starting out with caring for succulents, then this is an ideal plant for you to keep. It requires minimal care and can add character to a succulent garden, both indoors and outdoors.

Elephant Bush - Portulacaria Afra
Care For Your Elephant @dwarfjadebonsai

Thank you for reading! Enjoyed learning about the Elephant Bush succulent? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “The Most Common Issues Amongst Succulent Growers“. With this ebook you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Be sure to also check out similar articles on rare succulents like the Elephant Bush to spark up your interest. Check out “Crassula perforata – String of buttons” or even “Pachyphytum Oviferum — Moonstones“.

Happy Planting! 🌵

>