5 Tips for Propagating Succulents

Tips for Propagating Succulents

Propagation was our number one requested blog post article idea! (The polls on Instagram don’t lie) You asked us and we listened, continue reading below for our 5 tips to having a successful propagation process for your succulents.

Disclaimer: These are not all of the tips and tricks out there! These are just the tips that we wish we knew before our first propagation endeavor. (It was a nightmare at first). Feel free to let us know your techniques!

1. Some succulents are Easier to Propagate than Others

There are so many species of succulents out there and they all differ in difficulty when it comes to propagating. Three of the easiest succulents to have success with are: Kalanchoe daigremontiana (Mother of Thousands), Sedum morganianum (Burro’s Tail), and Sedum rubrotinctum.

Burros Tail Succulent Tips
Burro’s Tail Succulent Image: @done.by_hand_concrete

If you’re a beginner, we definitely recommend starting your propagation journey with these species! A lot of the time, the leaves of these succulents will fall down on their own and you can do the propagation process with them without accidentally cutting off too much of the leaf.

To learn more about this, check out “Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off”

2. Patience

Patience you must have my young “propagator.”

Yoda from Star Wars

Time to test your patience! Succulent propagation can sometimes take up to four to six weeks before the new leaf cuttings will begin to root. Remember, great things don’t happen in a day and this process is going to be worth it at the end.

When it is time for the ends of your clippings to dry out and harden, this alone can sometimes take up to a week, so make sure you don’t rush the process!

3. Watering Succulents

After the ends of the leaves have hardened over, it’s time to water them! Every leaf hardens over at different times. This is important to know because if you water them when they haven’t fully hardened, too soon after cutting from the mother plant, they’ll sometimes turn mushy and yellowish.

When propagating, here at Succulent City we spritz the leaves once a day. A quick spray over the top of all the leaves should be enough, not too close to them. Some leaves are going to look different than others, which is totally normal.

If you want to learn more about when you should water your succulents check out our in-depth article here.

4. Don’t Place the Clippings in Direct Sunlight

Succulents are desert plants and usually, they all need to be in direct sunlight for the majority of the day. This is true, but not with the succulent leaves during the propagation process.

I always put my leaves by a window that’s protected with some shade. Once the new plant has grown from the leaves, then they can be placed in direct sunlight.

ALSO READ:

Succulent Buds Sprouting
Succulent Buds Image: @peculiarshadelemontree

5. Don’t Get Discouraged

Remember that this can sometimes be a frustrating process. Not every single leaf will create a new plant. (Remember what Yoda said).

Don’t get discouraged if you don’t have a 100% success rate. Most of the time I usually only have about 50-70% success rate for all of the leaves I propagate.

Keep up with the process and try again! Practice makes perfect, even the “experts” don’t succeed with the propagation process each time.

Until next time! Oh and don’t forget to share the love down below.

Enjoyed learning about 5 Tips for Propagating Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the eBook about The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our eBooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

View our entire eBook collection here: SucculentCity eBooks

The Art of Repotting Succulents— the Right Way

Repotting Succulents the Right Way

Whether you’ve been a succulent guru for the past ten years or you just purchased your very first succulent plant, knowing how to repot succulents correctly is crucial for long life. Below you will find a step-by-step process on how exactly to repot your succulent, so you can do it successfully. (And have some fun with it).

When Should You Be Repotting Succulents

repotting succulents
Repotting Succulents@succulent.yinn

Here are a few reasons when you should repot your beautiful succulent plants. 

You bought a new succulent plant to add your collection.

When you purchase a beautiful succulent plant at your local store, they usually come in those small, cheap black plastic containers. (You know what i’m talking about). Not only do these plastic containers look hideous in your home, they also obstruct the growth of your succulent plant.

Make sure you repot your succulent after you purchase it with soil and potting mix that is nourishing for your succulent. You don’t want to wait too long before you repot it, I would safely say no more than 2 weeks. (1 week to be certain). We highly recommend using a terra-cotta planter  as they greatly help with moisture. Though, any planter with drainage holes should do.

You have a gut feeling that when watering your succulent, it feels “weird” or “different”.

If your treasured succulent plant seems to dry out quickly shortly after watering it, thus requiring more frequency in watering, it can be a sign that you may need to repot your succulent. Sometimes the planter or pot you utilize may not allow for a good flow for the water to travel around the plant completely.

Also, if your succulent isn’t absorbing the water, this can be another sign that your pot is too small. If it’s too tight and cramped, your succulent won’t be able to fully use it’s roots stress free. Consider a larger pot.

repotting succulents
gorgeous succulent arrangement @succycrazy

Your succulent looks like it’s outgrowing its pot.

If you succulent plant looks like it’s outgrowing the current pot that it’s in, do it a tremendous favor and repot it. (Succulents need room to grow just like you and I). If you see the roots growing out of the bottom of the planter or pot repot it.

Sometimes the plant looks squished within the current pot and this is another sign that you should repot your succulent plant so that it continues to grow healthy. It’s begging for a new home!

You don’t want to upset your succulent plant do you?

Plain and simple, you can’t remember the last time you repotted your flourishing succulent.

If it’s been days, weeks and then years since the last time you repotted (or remembered), this can be a telling sign that it’s time to switch things up.

It’s important to know that when considering repotting, it may not be necessary to actually make a change in the pot or planter itself. You may need to switch things up with the soil and placement rather than the pot or planter.

How Often Should I Repot Succulents

repotting succulents
Succulents @growingwithsucculents

All plants have a different time frames for when they mature out of their current pot, but most plants should be repotted in between 12 and 18 months. Though it’s ideal to repot your succulent plants every 12 to 18 months in order to keep it healthy, there are exceptions.

Some succulent plants can spend a few years in their planters or pots before it requires another change.

PRO TIP— Even if it’s technically not time to repot, make sure you regularly change out the soil. This is SUPER beneficial for the plant. Why? New soil has a bunch of crucial nutrients that the succulents need to survive and thrive! If the soil looks old, change things up a bit. (Change is good).

Spring is growing season for your indoor succulents. Fuel them up with a little more water and new soil. Watch them grow like the beautiful succulents you see on pinterest.

What Supplies Do I Need to Repot Succulents

A New Pot: Make sure it’s larger than the pot you’re transferring the succulent from and has a drainage hole at the bottom (very important). Spice things up a bit and get a fun new funky pot that your succulent and home will love.

New Soil: The nutrients from the new soil will make your plant thrive. Just like us, your succulent plants need rich soil (or food) to grow healthy and go about their daily lives.

A trowel: Don’t know what a trowel is? It’s that little baby shovel! Use it when removing the plant from it’s existing pot. If you’re repotting smaller succulents or propagating buds and seeds, be sure to use metal tweezers to help you plant them effectively and carefully. 

Coffee Filters : Use this to cover the drainage hole, it’s a great inexpensive solution aside from newspaper or the other materials you might use as a filter.

Riseuvo 5 Inch Terra Cotta Pots with Saucer - 6 Pack Clay Flower...
Hoffman 10404 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 4 Quarts,...
Radius Garden 16011 Root Slayer, Trowel, Red
8-12 Cup Basket Coffee Filters (Natural Unbleached, 500)
-
Riseuvo 5 Inch Terra Cotta Pots with Saucer - 6 Pack Clay Flower...
-
Hoffman 10404 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 4 Quarts,...
Radius Garden 16011 Root Slayer, Trowel, Red
8-12 Cup Basket Coffee Filters (Natural Unbleached, 500)

Last update on 2021-12-01 / Amazon

repotting succulents
repotting and propagating @succulentsuz

How to Repot Succulents

It’s time for the fun and action of this whole thing… I’m excited, are you?

The Prep Work: Make sure that a day or two before you plan on extracting the succulent from its existing pot, you water it frequently. Check the soil you will be using for the new pot and see if it seems a little dry. If it does, spray it a little bit with some water. Moisture is key in having a successful repotting process.

Step 1: Extract your succulent from the existing pot.

This step can sometimes be tricky, daunting even, but we promise it will be okay. Start by turning the plant sideways then grab the plant at the base of the stem. Tap the bottom of the container and shake it a little bit. If you have to, give the stem some nice and gentle pulls.

If your succulent plant is squished and there’s no way of safely removing the succulent plant out of the pot or planter, you might have to break it. Yes, you’d have to sacrifice the old planter for the new planter.

Gently hammer the planter not to hurt yourself in the process. Extract the beautiful and healthy succulent child you cared for deeply.

repotting succulents
adorable succulent set-up @cultivando_flores_plantas

Step 2: Root work.

Roots are obviously crucial to your succulent, so it’s important we take extra special care of them. If the plant’s roots look like they are tangled and knotted together in a bunch at the base of the plant, try to loosen them. Use your hands to loosen them! Feel free to give them a little trim too.  If you cut, tear, or even break some do not worry. This is not the end of the world. Just do your best to be careful and do this process cautiously, patiently, and calmly.

3. Removing & Replacing Potting Mix.

Remove about ⅓ of the existing old potting mix. Pour a layer of the new soil you bought, which is packed with nutrients that your succulents are going to love! Then place the plant on the new soil. Once you make sure that it’s centered, add more mix around the base of the plant until it sits straight up without you holding it. Make sure you do not put too much of the mix in the planter so that the roots can breathe!

You also do not want to put soil to the tippy top of the pot because when you try to water it, it will overflow and make a mess. (It happens to the best of us). 

4. Water your succulent.

Make sure you water your succulent well! This is a major problem if you don’t do it correctly. We wrote an article with over 2000 shares to help you understand how to water your succulents to be healthy and thriving.

Give it more water than usual, this is because it will drain through the entire pot and all of the soil.

ALSO READ:

repotting succulents
nautical succulent pots @curso_lembrancinhasplantas

There you have it! How to repot your succulent plants the right way. If you haven’t already be sure to check out our other articles, you’ll probably get a kick out of the 12 minimalistic succulent planters we have too. Or check out Air Plants vs Succulent Plants and Why is My Succulent Rotting to enhance your succulent knowledge!

Feeling inspired to own every succulent you can get your hands on?! (don’t feel bad, we do too) We have an awesome opportunity to fulfill your succulent dreams. Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today!

Thanks for reading, be sure to share your re-potting photos in our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge, where thousands of succulent lovers would love to see!

Enjoyed learning about Repotting Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about Replanting Practices to Keep Your Succulents Safe. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting!

Succulents: Popular Trends on Instagram@ #succiepotinapot

Succulent Trends on Instagram

The succulent community on Instagram is known for creating fun challenges for all of us succulent lovers to join in on. Recently, the #succiepotinapot challenge has become very popular and continues to bring out the creativity in many succulents enthusiasts on Instagram.

As soon as the hashtag was created, there has been a plethora of designs that include a small pot within a larger pot which gives the illusion that the pot is actually standing upright when it really is not. From intricate designs to teeny tiny pots, it is easy to see how much the succulent community has enjoyed this challenge.

If you are someone who likes creating succulent arrangements then this challenge is perfect for you! As a participant of the #succiepotinapot challenge, Succulent City asked us to share our step by step process we used to create our design.

If you are familiar with our work on Instagram, then you may just recognize this design as well! In this article, we are to explain what you will need to create your very own #succiepotinapot that you won’t be able to resist showing off!

Check out our video on instagram before you get started. See what it looks like and get a taste of what’s to come!

Succulent pot trend

Supplies Needed

Choose your Style of Succulents Planters

To start, you will want to find two pots. One of the pots should be relatively smaller than the other to give the illusion of a pot within a pot. In this design, we used two different sized terra-cotta pots that already have a drainage hole on the bottom: the large size is 10 inches across and 6 inches deep and the small size is 4 inches across and 4 inches deep.

You may choose to use a different styled pot depending on your design aesthetic, but make sure the pots have a drainage hole on the bottom. Take a look at these minimal planters if you’re having trouble finding a planter for this project.

Last update on 2021-12-01 / Amazon

Step 1

Succulent pot trend instagram

First, fill the large pot with your choice of succulents plants and cacti plants soil mix. Then with the small pot on its side add the soil into the larger pot. Half of the small pot should be showing, and add extra soil to set it in place.

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Not sure what is the best soil to use when planting succulents plants, don’t worry, we’ve written about the best soil for succulents that has gained quite the interest.

Plant your Succulents plants

Step 2

Succulent pot instagram trend

We start by adding the Senecio rowleyanus, also known as String of Pearls, which gives the illusion that the plant is hanging from a pot as if it was upright. When planting the String of Pearls, make sure to tuck the roots into the smaller pot to make it look like the plant is hanging over the small pot.

Step 3

Succulent pot trend instagram

After you have your String of Pearls in place, it is time to add succulents plants that make it look like an upright arrangement. For this design, we used three colorful succulents plants that work well with the aesthetic of this design. Check out 16 other types of succulents that work perfectly for this project!

First, we place a stunning Echeveria subsessilis towards the corner of the pot, making sure to keep the plant tucked in closely to the already planted String of Pearls. To plant the Echeveria, make sure to massage the roots if they are root bound and create a small-sized hole in the soil. Add the roots of the Echeveria into the hole and surround the succulent with extra soil.

Step 4

Succulent pot trend on instagram

Next, we added the Fenestraria aurantiaca, or Baby Toes. Again, make sure to massage the roots if the succulent is root-bound and nestle the plant close to the already planted succulents plants. Using planting tools or even gardening tweezers will help spread the roots easily.

Step 5

Succulent pot trend on instagram

Lastly, we added an Echeveria ‘Ramillette’ to tie the design together. This one is placed on the other side, rounding out the look of the small succulent pot. Here is where you can really start to see the illusion come to life.

Add your Top Dressing

The last step of the design process is to add a top dressing of your choice. This is the most important part of the design because it defines the smaller pot and creates the desired effect. In this design, we used a sandy color stone that works well with the colors of the succulents plants and terra-cotta pots.

Step 6

Succulent pot trend instagram

Place the top dressing around the edges to really highlight the smaller pot.

Time to Post

Once you are satisfied with your design, take a photo, and show off your creation by posting it onto your Instagram with the #succiepotinapot to join in on this exciting challenge!

Check out the Instagram video for reference if you haven’t already!


That’s it! The #succiepotinapot project is complete. Be sure to tag us @succulentcity so we can see what you’ve come up with. Who knows, maybe we’ll feature yours too!

Did this DIY project inspire your inner gardener? We have the perfect opportunity for you then! Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents plants, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents plants and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today! 

Want to continue enhancing your succulent knowledge? We have some additional articles that we think you may enjoy! Check out Top 5 Hanging Succulent Planters Worth Having, Are Succulents Poisonous, or Best Grow Lights Reviewed by Succulent Lovers.

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Thanks for reading, hoped this inspired you! Happy planting!?

How to Water Air Plants

How to Water Air Plants

I know, I know—these cute little plants are just to die for! Don’t have soil? No worries! They don’t need it anyway. They absorb nutrients and water through trichomes which is just a fancy name for the fine hairs located on the leaves. (Kind of like our fine hairs on our arms).

This presents endless possibilities on creative ways to display them. From those adorable teensy terrariums to seashells, or anything really, air plants don’t mind at all.

With their attractive spiky tendrils, these epiphytes are no doubt a got-to-have in every living room. And if you’re a brown thumb looking for some bragging rights, air plants got you covered.

These trendy plants are low-maintenance and so you can get away with some little negligence. Less maintenance and easier to take care of than your traditional succulent plant, count me in!

Losing an air plant is a sad affair. Though hard to kill, these plants will collapse on you due to several reasons. The most common however, is in regard to watering. To have a healthy air plant, the following watering best practices are valuable.

Watering air plants
@ary_plants

What are Air Plants?

Air plants are part of the Tillandsia genus which consists of about 650 species. Native to Mexico and the Americas, air plants are epiphytes, which means they grow on other plants and emerge from stem crevices or tree branches. Their roots can also attach to rocks and other shrubs just for support as the roots can’t take in water or nutrients.

In their native tropical rainforest habitats, air plants survive by absorbing water in the humid environment through their leaves. Unlike other plants, these rule-breakers don’t require dirt to grow, just air.

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Do Air Plants Need Water?

A common myth associated with growing air plants is that since these plants grow in the air, they don’t need water. This is fueled by the fact that they absorb water from the atmosphere and so they can survive long periods with little or no water. If you follow such advice, you’ll soon end up with a withered plant.

While it’s true air plants absorb water from the atmosphere, the environment they’re grown in has a huge bearing on this. Their native tropical rainforest habitats are very humid and they get along pretty well.

In home settings, however, the humidity is nothing close compared to the forests out there and so they have to be watered just like any house plant.

One way to water your air plants is to soak them in water. We recommended using a large bowl like this or something similar.

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Watering air plants
@ary_plants

What Type of Water is Used for Air Plants?

Since air plants don’t grow in soil, they solely depend on water to get their minerals and nutrients. Therefore, the best water for air plants would definitely be rainwater.

Here’s a neat little tool you can use to collect rainwater for your air plants when it rains.

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However, this may not be easily accessible and so you may opt for spring water. You may also use creek water, pond water, well water, or lake water.

If you can’t get a hold of any of these options, then tap water can be utilized. Your last option should be soft or distilled water. It has little nutrients and minerals—not suitable for air plants as they depend on these nutrients for growth.

Mistakes to Avoid when Watering Air Plants

Thanks to the current digital age, it doesn’t take long for misinformation to spread rapidly. And this has been true when it comes to watering air plants.

Hordes of air plant enthusiasts have lost their plants due to such misleading advice. Avoid the following like the plague…

Assuming there’s sufficient water in the air

Don’t let the name “air plant” fool you. Air plants won’t get all the water they need from the air especially when growing in the living room or office.

Sure, they may absorb itty bitty amounts of water through their trichomes but that is nowhere close to what they need to survive. Depending on the climate of your surroundings, you might need to water your air plants once a week.

 

How to water air plants the right way
@thetipsygardener

Excess humidity due to wet bed

Nothing spells disaster for air plants more quickly than a wet bed. They’ll be susceptible to rot. Planting air plants with plants that require constant moisture like moss plants is not recommended. Air plants flourish on dry medium. Avoid very enclosed containers as this may lead to increased moisture leading to rot.

Ways to Water Air Plants

Watering air plants doesn’t have to be a high-brow process. The following ways are ideal when it comes to watering air plants.

Misting

If you live in an arid area, your plants will appreciate periodic spritzing using a spray bottle similar to this.

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    It’s important to note that this method can’t stand in as the only means to watering your plants. It should only complement other watering methods. The trichomes on the leaves are unable to absorb enough water through misting.

    Dunking

    If your plants are thirsty and you’re in a rush, you can give them a quick drink to last them the whole day by dunking them in water.

    To do this, just submerge the plant in water once or a few more times and they’ll be good until you have enough time to give them a thorough drink. Like a short swim!

    Tips for watering air plants
    @zoiascreations

    Soaking

    Giving your plants a full bath is the best way to water your plants.

    This ensures that trichomes have enough time to absorb water and nutrients. To properly soak your plants, fill a bowl with water and fully submerge your air plants.

    For much bigger air plants and depending on their number too, you can opt for the bathtub or sink. Be extra gentle with air plants that have blooms and don’t submerge the buds. Let the plants stay soaked in the water for at least one hour, on a weekly basis on the minimum side.

    To remove the plant from the water, hold it from the base and pull it upside down, shaking it gently to get rid of excess water. Use water at room temperature to avoid shocking your plant.

    Drying Air Plants

    Once you’ve figured out how to successfully water your plants, what follows is leaving them to dry out right after their bath time. Lay them on a colander, towel or a dish drying rack and set them in a brightly lit area for two to four hours.

    Also, ensure the area has plenty of air circulation—they’re air plants, remember?

    Only return your plants to their display after they’re fully dry to prevent water from accumulating inside the plant which will ultimately result in rotting.

    How Frequently Should I Water my Air Plant?

    Watering air plants at home
    @airplantdesignstudio

    This largely depends on the climate in your area.

    While air plants grown in humid areas may do well with watering only once a week, those in drier areas may need frequent soaking. You can also look for dehydration evidence on your plants.

    A parched air plant has curly leaves with a dull color while a hydrated plant has open and wide leaves.

    But for those that want to, it’s actually not that hard to care for and water air plants. Let us know if you end up trying to care for some air plants, we’ll have more articles about this soon. In the meantime, happy planting!

    ALSO READ:


    Think you’ll give air plants a try now? If not, here’s some rare succulents you can check out.

    Has this helped you at all? Be sure to share with a fellow green thumb, i’m sure the info will help them too!

    If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

    How to Grow Hens and Chicks Succulents

    How to Grow Hens and Chicks

    Growing hens and chicks (Sempervivum tectorum) plants in your garden is quite simple, especially if you want a lot of them. Their offsets keep coming!

    Hens and chicks have beautiful rosettes that come in colors like red, green, blue, and copper. They grow like nobody’s business and produce tons of baby plants cutely called chicks, so it’s likely that you’ll never have to buy more than one Hen.

    Hens and chicks are easy to care for and can thrive indoors or outdoors, so they’re the perfect plant for pretty much everyone!

    If you want to keep your Sempervivum tectorum looking like spring chickens, then you’re going to need our advice! Find out how to grow hens and chicks in your own garden.

    How to Grow Hens and Chicks Succulents
    Growing hens and chicks (Sempervivum tectorum) plants is quite simple, especially if you want a lot of them. Their offsets keep coming! @joske.anoebis.goa

    Hens and chicks

    I bet you’re probably wondering why this plant has such a weird name! It’s called hens and chicks or hens and chickens because it produces a lot of offsets, which are also known as chicks.

    In case you didn’t know, offsets are baby succulents that sprout from mature plants, in this case, called Hen. The mother plant “hatches” baby chicks just like a hen does, so that’s how it got its quirky name hens and chicks!

    Binomial nomenclatureSempervivum tectorum
    Other namesHens and chicks, hen and chickens, hen-and-chicks, hens-and-chickens, houseleek, roof houseleek, hen-widdies
    SizeThey can grow up to be up to 4 inches tall
    pH6.6 to 7.5
    SunFull Sun to Part Sun
    ClimateCold Hardy, Winter Vegetables
    Growing LocationsThroughout the US
    GroundSandy, Excellent Drainage
    WaterLow, Drought Tolerant

    Sempervivum tectorum

    Hens and chicks are also called Sempervivum tectorum. Serpevivum means “always living” in Latin. Sempervivum plants got this name because they sprout many offsets that live on after the mother plant dies.

    Sempervivums are also called houseleeks because they used to be planted on thatched roofs to keep them from catching on fire during lightning storms. They store a lot of water in their leaves, so it makes sense that they would prevent fires from spreading.

    How to care

    Hens and chicks are native to the mountains of Europe, so they’ve adapted to cold weather and are considered a winter vegetable. Even though they’re tough and can withstand less than ideal conditions, there are still a few things you need to know to keep them healthy. Here are some of our best caretaking tips for hens and chicks.

    The best soil

    If you’ve read our other plant guides, you already know that you need to put your plants in well-draining soil. We talk about drainage so often because it’s super important!

    If your hens and chicks get waterlogged, it may get mushy leaves, start to attract pests, or die from root rot. Nobody wants that!

    Planting your succulent in cactus or succulent soil will prevent your plant from sitting in water and meeting an untimely end. Commercial succulent soil is a good choice because it contains porous materials like perlite and pumice that improve drainage and keep your plant nice and dry.

    We highly recommend this soil mix as it is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. We like to get a large bag as we propagate a lot of plants. It is useful to always have soil on hand for any plant project.

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    How to water

    Watering your hens and chicks plants every two weeks is usually enough, but watch out for signs of under watering like dry, wrinkly leaves.

    Fill up a watering can and douse the soil until water runs out of the pot’s drainage hole. In between these deep waterings, let the plant’s ground dry out completely.

    Doing this encourages your hens and chicks to develop a healthy root system because its roots will grow deeper as it searches the soil for more water. Letting the soil dry out also prevents root rot.

    Light requirements

    Hens and chicks can handle anything from partial shade to full sun. Their fleshy leaves are a bit delicate and can burn during the hottest months of the year, so if you keep your succulent outdoors, watch out for signs of sunburn like brown, faded, or crispy leaves.

    It’s a good idea to invest in some shade cloth to keep your outdoor succulents cooler on hot days. You should also water your plants more frequently during hot weather to cool down the soil.

    Temperature and climate

    Hens and chicks are cold hardy plants, which means they can survive in below-freezing temperatures. Even if the temperature drops to negative 40 degrees, your plant baby will still be ok. Sempervivum tectorum can thrive in winters thanks to their cold-hardy attributes.

    A lot of plants can’t handle temps like that—the water they store in their leaves freezes from the cold and make the leaves brown and mushy. Their ability to survive in cold weather is just one of the many things that make Hens and Chicks remarkable!

    Even though this succulent is cold-hardy, it grows best in mild temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees. So growing hens and chicks indoors is not only possible, but also good for them as long as they get enough light.

    Keep them near a bright window like the south or east-facing window for the best results.

    Fertilizing

    Hens and chicks can survive in nutritionally poor ground, so you don’t absolutely need to fertilize them. You probably want your plant to grow more quickly and look more vibrant, though, so you should fertilize it once every month or two during the spring and summer.

    The best fertilizer for hens and chicks is a low-balanced, water-soluble fertilizer. Low-balanced fertilizers are milder and have less of a chance of burning the leaves of your plant. When you’re buying a fertilizer, look for one that has three small, identical numbers on the package, like 8-8-8.

    Even though you’re using a mild fertilizer, you should still dilute it to half strength. Hens and chicks don’t need as much fertilizer as other plants, so you don’t want to give yours as much as the package calls for. Standard fertilizers generally call for 1 tablespoon of fertilizer per gallon of water, but you should only use ½ tablespoon.

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    Do Hens and Chicks Bloom?

    Some succulents use up all of their resources in order to produce flowers and seeds, which leaves nothing for the rest of the plant. Succulents that die after they flower are called monocarpic succulents.

    Hens and chicks flower and die after about three or four years. Your plant may flower earlier if it’s under stress from not getting enough water or sunlight. It flowers early to try and spread its seed in the hopes that the new plants will grow somewhere with better conditions. Even if you take care of your plant perfectly, though, it will eventually flower and die.

    When this happens to your hens and chicks, try not to be upset! You can save the seeds from the flowers and plant them to grow brand new babies.

    Plus, your main plant probably produced a lot of chicks before it died that will grow and take its place.

    Growing and Propagating

    Hens and Chicks have no trouble growing and propagating on their own, but if you want even more plants, you can grow them from seed. You can harvest seeds from your mature plant after it flowers or purchase them online.

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    Mother plant

    If you’d rather not go to the trouble of growing succulents yourself (we don’t blame you), your hens and chicks plant will do the work for you. It produces lots of offsets that you can divide from the mother plant and put in their own pots.

    Growing from Seeds

    Grab a pot or planting tray and fill it up with some succulent or cactus soil.

    With clean hands, take the seeds of hens and chicks and place them on top of the soil. Since the seeds are so tiny, it can be hard to see where you’re putting them, so just do your best to space them out a little.

    After they’re in the soil, make sure you remember to mist them with some water. Keep them moist over the next few weeks until they germinate. Give them access to plenty of sunlight and keep them in a warm room that’s between 70 and 75 degrees if you can.

    It’s unlikely that all of your seeds will germinate, so keep that in mind. Don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t work out the first time… keep trying!

    Dividing Offsets

    Hens and chicks seeds don’t always produce new plants that look like the mature plant they came from. If you want your chicks to retain the characteristics of your hen, the best way to do that is by dividing offsets.

    Most hens and chicks varieties grow offsets from a stem that’s attached to the mother plant. That stem is called a stolon. It’s best to wait until the stolon withers to replant these offsets. By the time the stolon withers, the offsets will have developed root systems of their own and have the best chance of surviving.

    To separate this kind of offset, break or cut the stolon and carefully loosen the soil around the chick. Lift it up out of the soil and transplant it to a pot filled with succulent soil or a new spot in your garden. Wait a few days to water them so that they get a chance to adjust to their new environment.

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    There you have it! Those are all the things you need to know to become an expert hens and chicks gardener.

    If you’d like this guide you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

    Even if you think you have a black thumb, don’t chicken out! Go buy yourself one. We know you’ll do a great job taking care of it. Happy planting!