7 Best Succulents for Beginners

7 Best Succulents for Beginners

There are two types of people in this world: those who have that “green thumb” and can manage to make even typical garden weeds look like intricate floral arrangements and those whose homes are basically planted cemeteries.

I’m definitely of the latter persuasion, which I learned when I somehow managed to completely botch my first foray into succulent parenthood (it turns out that, while succulents are just about the easiest, most low-maintenance plants there are, they still do need some water and sunlight).

To be fair, I wasn’t really aware that there are many, many different types of succulents (something I probably could’ve found out with a simple Google search, but I digress) — including those that are perfect for people still working on turning that thumb green.

The best succulents for beginners have a few things in common.

For one, they require very little vigilance. Maybe you’re looking to bring a little life into your house without also having to worry too much about actually keeping it alive with a precise watering schedule. Secondly, they can survive in just about any climate. And, of course, they look gorgeous, bringing a modern feel to your space without needing any kind of special arrangement expertise.

So if you’re wondering where to begin, here are a few ideas to lead you in the right direction.

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1. Golden Barrel Cactus (Echinocactus grusonii)

Golden Barrel Cactus and Picture Frames
Golden Barrel Cactus Image: @flowersbyren_

Affectionately (and hilariously) known as the “mother-in-law’s cushion,” the Golden Barrel Cactus is one of the best succulents for beginners because it’s very drought-tolerant and doesn’t require much attention to do its thing. According to House Plants Expert, this cactus thrives indoors as long as it has enough sunshine. In the warmer months, you’ll need to water it when its soil starts drying out, but in the winter you’ll find you barely have to water it at all.

They grow fast, so you will have to repot it when it’s young. In fact, Tom Jesch from Altman Plants explained in a YouTube video that they can get up to 400 pounds in the wild. Assuming you don’t have that much room for a succulent, you don’t have to worry all that much about a giant cactus taking over your home. The growth rate slows down as it ages, and takes about 10 years to reach a full 10 inches across, so you’d have to have it for a while before it got that big.

2. Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera in White Potted Planter
Aloe Vera Image: @aloegal604

Not only is Aloe Vera the perfect succulent for people prone to getting sunburn, but it’s also a pretty easy plant to take care of. They thrive indoors and don’t need much sunlight — according to the Farmer’s Almanac, indirect sunlight or even artificial light will do. Best of all, you only have to remember to water it every three weeks. As Nell from Joy Us Garden wrote, “easy does it” when it comes to watering an aloe plant.

3. Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)

Sago Palm Succulent Next to Blonde Female
Sago Palm Image: @monicaraymondlynch

You can grow the versatile Sago Palm indoors or outdoors, and it can even survive in temperatures below zero. While young plants require a little more attention (they’ll need watering once a week or so, according to the San Francisco Chronicle), as they mature you’ll only need to water it when the soil dries out. The Sago Palms are also incredibly resistant when it comes to pests, which means you don’t have to worry about it falling victim to any mites hanging around your house.

4. Zebra Haworthia (Haworthia fasciata)

Two Zebra Haworthia Succulents in Blue & Tan Planters
Zebra Haworthia Image: @stayinalivesucculents

This gorgeous “zebra plant” looks a lot like Aloe Vera, but you’ll be able to tell it apart from the healing plant thanks to its white stripes. Like Aloe, Haworthia succulents don’t need direct sunlight or much water, making them a great addition to the home of someone missing that green thumb. These particular succulents also tell you when they need watering — well, sort of. According to Vegged Out, a Haworthia’s leaves are a good indicator of whether or not they need a drink, taking a lot of the guesswork out of caring for your plant.

5. Echeveria

Echeveria Succulent in Tiny Planter
Echeveria Image: @hollyoftherain

According to Certified Urban Agriculturalist Bonnie L. Grant, Echeveria succulents were basically made for people without much succulent know-how. “The Echeveria succulent plant is just such a specimen, thriving on brief periods of neglect and low water and nutrients,” she wrote for Gardening Know How. “Echeveria care is practically foolproof and grows well in either containers or toasty garden beds.” Sold.

6. Panda Plant (Kalanchoe tomentosa)

Panda Plant Succulent Close Up
Panda Plant Image: @jialailai

Panda Plants have a cool name and even cooler leaves, which have a velvet look to them and are soft to the touch. While they need a good amount of (indirect) sunlight, they’re pretty forgiving when it comes to watering. They typically store water in those fuzzy leaves of theirs which lets you get away with forgetting a watering cycle every once in a while.

7. Living Stones (Lithops)

Living Stones Succulent in Planter Held in Hand
Living Stones Image: @jardines_flora

Living Stones might not be the prettiest succulents on the list, but hey — they’re easy to care for, and that’s what’s important, right? While you may not want these as standalone plants, they’re cute little additions to terrariums that look like you made a lot of effort when really, they’re good at taking care of themselves.

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

When Should You Really Water Your Succulents

When you should water you succulents?

Everyone praises succulents as being really easy to care for, so it’s kind of embarrassing when one dies on you.

Don’t worry, you (probably) don’t have a brown thumb. There are a few misconceptions about how to care for succulents well. You really only have to straighten out one thing to become a succulent maven – watering.

How often to water succulents?

Here’s a little-known secret for succulent care – the amount that you water succulents isn’t nearly as important as how often you water them.

It makes sense if you consider why succulents are so sensitive to water.

Since most succulents and cacti are native to dry, desert-y conditions, they have adaptations to prevent water loss. That thick waxy sheen on the leaves is called a “cuticle” and it prevents water from evaporating out of the leaves. Succulents even have a special version of photosynthesis (called CAM photosynthesis) where they only open their pores at night to minimize water loss.

These plants are really good at retaining water. So good, in fact, that they can accidentally drown themselves. Plants actually breathe mostly through their roots, believe it or not. If those roots are wet, they can’t breathe.

Succulent roots have evolved to act like every drop of water might be the last. They cling jealously to all the water they can find in their soil. Unfortunately, if the soil is constantly wet, it leads to root rot – a deadly illness for most plants (and succulents are particularly susceptible).

The number one killer of succulents is overwatering. But not in the sense that they get too much water – rather, they get watered too often. It’s absolutely crucial that the soil is given time to dry out between waterings.

So how often do you actually water a succulent or cactus? A good rule of thumb is to water once every 10 days. You should still check to be sure that the soil is dry (and has been for a couple days) before you water again.

How much to water succulents?

Now we know when to water our succulents and cacti, but not how much.

To figure this out, we go back to the desert these plants came from. It does actually rain in the desert, contrary to common belief. However, that only happens a couple times a year. And in the desert the saying “When it rains, it pours.” is very accurate. The sky just dumps buckets of water. Succulents like to be watered this way too, albeit a bit more often. Forget about the eyedroppers and spray bottles. Put those ‘succers’ under the faucet and drench them. You should water until the water begins to run out of the bottom of the pot. That’s how you know you’ve soaked the soil all the way through.

And that part is important – you want to ensure that all of the soil is completely wetted. If you use only a little water, it doesn’t penetrate more than the top couple of inches of soil. That forces the succulent to grow roots upwards instead of downwards. That leads to weak roots, poor stability, and an ineffective anchor for the succulent. A recipe for disaster.

Proper succulent watering technique

When you should water your succulents

While throwing your succulent in the sink is certainly a viable method, you can practice some more applied techniques for an even better effect.

We already mentioned that all the soil in the pot needs to be drenched. That’s still true. If possible, though, you should try to avoid getting water on the leaves. This opens the door to a few problems:

Mold and mildew can form in the crevices of a plant (like where the leaves meet the stem). It also provides a nice habitat for pests, who generally prefer moist environments. We recommend using a succulent watering bottle with bend watering mouth for easy control during the watering process! We really like this one by Mkono

2. Plants can’t drink through their leaves. That’s what roots are for. Any water on a leaf is being wasted.

3. Occasionally plants, even succulents, suffer from sunburn. When you leave a liquid like water on leaves while the succulent is exposed to bright sunlight, there’s a chance that the water will act like a magnifying glass and burn the leaf.

So, if you have few enough plants (or just really enjoy watering), you should water each succulent individually by pouring water at the base of the stem. Make sure to get the rest of the pot as well. If you are new to plants, we highly recommend this planting & watering tool kit.

Avoid overwatering

Water isn’t the only factor in the watering equation, actually. Soil plays a big part.

One of the qualities of soil is how much water it retains. Soil mixtures that have a lot of organic matter (stuff like peat moss, coconut coir, etc.) tend to hold a lot of water. Mixtures that mostly have minerals or inorganic matter (such as perlite or sand) don’t absorb water.

Succulents and cacti require quick-draining soil. You want the soil to dry out as quickly as possible after it’s watered. Ideally in the same day. That’s why watering in the morning is ideal – it has the whole day to evaporate.

So, grab some soil specific to succulents and cacti next time you’re out. Your plants will thank you. A quick DIY solution is to just buy a bag of perlite and mix it half and half with any other kind of soil. It’s not perfect, but it will dramatically increase drainage.

If you do not have any local places to pick up some quick-draining soil, we highly recommend this quick-draining soil from Superfly Bonsai on Amazon.

Note also that many succulents you buy (especially from big box stores) actually have a poor soil mix when they’re sold to you. You’ll probably want to repot them as soon as you’re able.

And speaking of pots – the second most important factor in preventing overwatering is having adequate drainage. That means use pots with a drainage hole. That means that teacups and terrariums aren’t optimal containers for succulents and cacti.

Without proper drainage at the bottom of a pot, water tends to pool and the roots stay wet for longer. That’s dangerous. And, no, gravel in the bottom of a pot does not constitute drainage. The water is still there. It doesn’t go anywhere.

We’re not saying you can never put them in those cutesy containers. (By the way, if you’re having trouble finding inspiration for planting succulents check out our 12 minimalistic ways to plant succulents). Just know that they might not survive it for very long or be very happy for the duration. So much for that Pinterest photo shoot you had planned, eh?

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When you should water your succulents and how often

Tips for succulent watering

  • Different plants have different needs. Sometimes wildly so. Kalanchoe, for example, are pretty thirsty succulents. They begin to wilt after a week without water. The famous “butt plants”, Lithops, can only be watered three or four times a year or they promptly die. (psst: if you are looking for Lithops Seeds, we recommend these by Micro Landscape Design)
  • Always err on the side of underwatering. Succulents and cacti are literally designed to be thirsty sometimes. They can almost always bounce back from lack of water… but recovering from too much water is a dicey prospect at best.
  • If you have a community pot (a pot with multiple species of plants), water to the lowest common denominator. That means that you should water only when the “driest” plants start to get thirsty. We are following the same advice as above – it’s better for succulents to be thirsty for a while rather than overwatering.

Thanks for reading!

We hope you got some pointers on how to keep your succulent family healthy! Also, don’t forget you can receive 2 FREE Audio books of your choice from our sponsor at Audible.com. We’ve got 2 books we listen to about propagation and watering succulents, what are you thinking of listening too?

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If you enjoyed reading our blog about When You Should Water Your Succulents, be sure to check out our other blogs. Personally I think you’ll enjoy this one: 6 Best Indoor Succulents.

If you learned something, please consider buying us a succulent for our office.

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Enjoyed learning about When You Should Water Your Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about The Correct Way to Water Succulents. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

How to Propagate Succulents Successfully

How to Propagate Succulents

It’s a lot more cost-effective to grow your own succulents. Fortunately, succulents naturally come equipped with an amazing ability regrow from leaves or branches… and that means free plants!

There are three primary methods of succulent propagation, each of them easier than the last!

Leaf Propagation

If you’ve ever seen leaf propagation in action, you probably understand at least part of the fascination surrounding succulents. People love taking pictures of their leaf props – and for good reason! Nothing is more satisfying for a plant parent than seeing a whole new succulent grow from a mere leaf.

It may seem that you need a green thumb to pull off this amazing feat, but nothing could be further from the truth. Propagating succulents from leaves is very easy. All you have to do is pull the leaf off.

… And you’re done! No, seriously, that’s all there is to it. If you remove the leaf, nature will take care of the rest. For the sake of thoroughness, however, I’ll add some details.

  1. It’s vital that you get a clean break when separating the leaf from the succulent. That means there should be no extra plant matter left on the leaf or stem. This isn’t difficult to achieve since succulent leaves don’t really need to be persuaded to fall off (looking at you, Ghost Plant).
  2. To ensure you get that clean break, grab the leaf close to the base and wiggle it gently from side to side. There shouldn’t be much “pulling” involved.
  3. Now that they’re separated, both the mother plant and the leaf have an open wound. You have to let it “callus” over (that’s the plant version of scabbing). Just set the leaf in a dry place and wait a week, a dish on the windowsill works great. (we highly recommend these propagation trays by Yield Lab). Don’t expose it to water during this period – that will slow or impair the callus formation and could allow bacteria or fungi to infect the succulent.
  4. Once the mother plant is callused, resume watering and treat it like normal. The leaf doesn’t need any special attention at the moment. Don’t water the leaf propagation until roots appear. It’s pointless since they can’t drink water without roots anyway. You may want to refer to our article about when you should water succulents if you need more information.
  5. You can put the leaf on dirt at any point, but don’t try burying it (or its roots). The succulent will take care of it.
  6. Once the roots show up, endeavour to keep them moist. Use a spray bottle to mist the leaf every couple of days. (Enter the quintessential, super affordable succulent tool kit). Keep the propagation in bright light so that the new growth doesn’t become etiolated (stretched out).

That’s pretty much it! It really is as simple as pulling the leaves and chucking them on some dirt. All of the nutrients, and most of the water, that they need is inside the leaf itself. After a few months, that leaf will shrivel up and fall off. Now you’ve got a whole new succulent for the cost of one leaf!

Be aware that this only works on succulents that have distinct stems and distinct leaves. Succulents like Echeveria, Sedum, Senecio, and Graptopetalum all make great candidates. If you try this with an Aloe or a Haworthia, for example, you’ll end up with a dead leaf and disappointment. Only do it if the leaf comes off easily!

Image by:@misucculents

 

Cutting Propagation

Anyone with a modicum of gardening experience will have used this technique before. It’s a trick as old as plants themselves. You cut off a part of a succulent and stick it back into the dirt and it just starts growing again.

Crazy, right?

Succulents have an even easier time of this than other plants. With herbs and veggies, you sometimes have to coax out new roots by putting the cutting in water for a while first, but that is not so with succulents.

Here’s how you propagate succulents via cuttings:

  1. Choose where to make the cut. It needs to be near the end of the branch or stem, usually 3 to 6 inches away is appropriate. You’ll also want to make sure that the plant is growing and healthy here – propagating a weak or dying plant is a recipe for failure.
  2. Clear the stem above the intended cut. Remove leaves one to two inches above the place you want to cut for two reasons: you’re going to put that part underground and also it makes it easier to get a good cut. Bonus tip – depending on the plant, you might be able to propagate succulents leaves!
  3. Make a clean cut perpendicular to the stem (the stem should be flat on top, not diagonal at all). Be sure to use really sharp, really sterile scissors. That part is important because dull scissors will crush the plant while cutting it, which makes it less likely to recover. Dirty scissors transfer germs directly into the wound – that’s no good. I highly recommend using gardening scissors or shears for this process. These gardening pruning shears by Vivoson are really really good!
  4. Allow the mother plant and the cutting to callus just as we did for leaves in the above technique. It should take between 3-10 days. Don’t let them get wet but keep them in direct light.
  5. Stick the bottom of the cutting into the dirt up to the place where the leaves start. Depending on the species of succulent, roots should start growing within a month and you can begin to water. There will be enough water in the plant already to sustain it until then.

We also recommend making sure you are using quality succulent soil. We highly recommend this soil mix by Bonsai Jack. It is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, it helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. 

VIVOSUN 6.5 Inch Gardening Hand Pruner Pruning Shear with...
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VIVOSUN 6.5 Inch Gardening Hand Pruner Pruning Shear with...
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Last update on 2021-10-07 / Amazon

In summary, snip off a bit of the succulent and stick it in the ground. It couldn’t be easier. This method only works with plants that have a pronounced stem, however. Sorry Aloe and Haworthia, that means you’re not eligible. Many of the plants we suggested for leaf propagation are also great choices here: Echeveria, Sedum, Graptosedum, Graptopetalum, etc.

This method is particularly useful because it addresses two problems:

  • It “fixes” etiolated plants. When plants have insufficient light and grow leggy, that can’t be undone. You can, however, snip out the leggy part and plant the top part again to have two plants – the base of the original (which will resume growth) and a cutting. Just make sure they get enough light this time!
  • It’s the fastest way to get new plants. Growing new succulents from leaves is easy and efficient, but slow. It could take up to a year to get a decent sized plant. Cuttings root and grow more quickly than leaf propagations (plus they start out bigger).
Image by: @growingwithsucculents

Budding Propagation

It’s finally time for Aloe to shine!

Ever notice how some plants just grow more of themselves? Sempervivum are famous for it – that’s why they’re commonly called Hens and Chicks. Haworthia do it too, as do Sansevieria. It’s a very common kind of propagation and not at all unique to succulents. It’s how grass gets around, too.

The baby plants are called “buds” or “pups” or “offshoots”. They usually grow out of the base of the mother plant and share a connected root system.

Propagating plants that reproduce through budding is a double-edged sword – on one hand, you literally don’t have to do anything at all, but on the other hand you have to wait for the plant to propagate on its own.

Being at the whim of your plants isn’t so bad, though. Keep them happy and healthy and buds should grow constantly throughout their growing season. Removing and replanting them is very similar to the process of take a cutting:

  1. First, you have to wait until they’re big enough to remove. It varies from species to species, but once they’re at least an inch or two in diameter (or several inches tall for the vertical variety of succulents).
  2. Find where the pup connects to the parent. It is probably either at the base of the primary stem or connected through a thick root called a “runner”. It’s okay to unpot the plant while you’re propagating it.
  3. Using the same technique we used for cutting propagations, make a clean cut where the bud meets the mother plant. If they share roots, give a generous portion to the baby when separating them. The mother plant can make more easily.
  4. Move the bud directly into a new pot, no need to wait for callusing this time. Still, you shouldn’t water it for a few days while it heals over.

Budding is also the way to propagate succulents like cacti, so you can use this method on them too!

 We hope you got some pointers on how to keep your plant family healthy! If you did, please take a moment to SHARE on Facebook or PIN US on Pinterest with the social buttons below!

Enjoyed learning about Propagating Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook titled The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully! With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll you have greater success with propagating! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Do you have any propagation tips or tricks? Share them with us in the comments below!

Thanks for reading!

If you enjoyed reading our blog about succulent propagation check out our other articles! Enhance your succulent knowledge with 6 Best Indoor Succulents, 6 Edible Succulents to Excite Your Taste Buds, or Household Items You Can use as Succulent Planters.

Are you looking for more propagation guides? You may want to take a look at our new ebook: The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully!

5 Tips for Propagating Succulents

Tips for Propagating Succulents

Propagation was our number one requested blog post article idea! (The polls on Instagram don’t lie) You asked us and we listened, continue reading below for our 5 tips to having a successful propagation process for your succulents.

Disclaimer: These are not all of the tips and tricks out there! These are just the tips that we wish we knew before our first propagation endeavor. (It was a nightmare at first). Feel free to let us know your techniques!

1. Some succulents are Easier to Propagate than Others

There are so many species of succulents out there and they all differ in difficulty when it comes to propagating. Three of the easiest succulents to have success with are: Kalanchoe daigremontiana (Mother of Thousands), Sedum morganianum (Burro’s Tail), and Sedum rubrotinctum.

Burros Tail Succulent Tips
Burro’s Tail Succulent Image: @done.by_hand_concrete

If you’re a beginner, we definitely recommend starting your propagation journey with these species! A lot of the time, the leaves of these succulents will fall down on their own and you can do the propagation process with them without accidentally cutting off too much of the leaf.

To learn more about this, check out “Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off”

2. Patience

Patience you must have my young “propagator.”

Yoda from Star Wars

Time to test your patience! Succulent propagation can sometimes take up to four to six weeks before the new leaf cuttings will begin to root. Remember, great things don’t happen in a day and this process is going to be worth it at the end.

When it is time for the ends of your clippings to dry out and harden, this alone can sometimes take up to a week, so make sure you don’t rush the process!

3. Watering Succulents

After the ends of the leaves have hardened over, it’s time to water them! Every leaf hardens over at different times. This is important to know because if you water them when they haven’t fully hardened, too soon after cutting from the mother plant, they’ll sometimes turn mushy and yellowish.

When propagating, here at Succulent City we spritz the leaves once a day. A quick spray over the top of all the leaves should be enough, not too close to them. Some leaves are going to look different than others, which is totally normal.

If you want to learn more about when you should water your succulents check out our in-depth article here.

4. Don’t Place the Clippings in Direct Sunlight

Succulents are desert plants and usually, they all need to be in direct sunlight for the majority of the day. This is true, but not with the succulent leaves during the propagation process.

I always put my leaves by a window that’s protected with some shade. Once the new plant has grown from the leaves, then they can be placed in direct sunlight.

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Succulent Buds Sprouting
Succulent Buds Image: @peculiarshadelemontree

5. Don’t Get Discouraged

Remember that this can sometimes be a frustrating process. Not every single leaf will create a new plant. (Remember what Yoda said).

Don’t get discouraged if you don’t have a 100% success rate. Most of the time I usually only have about 50-70% success rate for all of the leaves I propagate.

Keep up with the process and try again! Practice makes perfect, even the “experts” don’t succeed with the propagation process each time.

Until next time! Oh and don’t forget to share the love down below.

Enjoyed learning about 5 Tips for Propagating Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the eBook about The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our eBooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

View our entire eBook collection here: SucculentCity eBooks

The Art of Repotting Succulents— the Right Way

Repotting Succulents the Right Way

Whether you’ve been a succulent guru for the past ten years or you just purchased your very first succulent plant, knowing how to repot succulents correctly is crucial for long life. Below you will find a step-by-step process on how exactly to repot your succulent, so you can do it successfully. (And have some fun with it).

When Should You Be Repotting Succulents

repotting succulents
Repotting Succulents@succulent.yinn

Here are a few reasons when you should repot your beautiful succulent plants. 

You bought a new succulent plant to add your collection.

When you purchase a beautiful succulent plant at your local store, they usually come in those small, cheap black plastic containers. (You know what i’m talking about). Not only do these plastic containers look hideous in your home, they also obstruct the growth of your succulent plant.

Make sure you repot your succulent after you purchase it with soil and potting mix that is nourishing for your succulent. You don’t want to wait too long before you repot it, I would safely say no more than 2 weeks. (1 week to be certain). We highly recommend using a terra-cotta planter  as they greatly help with moisture. Though, any planter with drainage holes should do.

You have a gut feeling that when watering your succulent, it feels “weird” or “different”.

If your treasured succulent plant seems to dry out quickly shortly after watering it, thus requiring more frequency in watering, it can be a sign that you may need to repot your succulent. Sometimes the planter or pot you utilize may not allow for a good flow for the water to travel around the plant completely.

Also, if your succulent isn’t absorbing the water, this can be another sign that your pot is too small. If it’s too tight and cramped, your succulent won’t be able to fully use it’s roots stress free. Consider a larger pot.

repotting succulents
gorgeous succulent arrangement @succycrazy

Your succulent looks like it’s outgrowing its pot.

If you succulent plant looks like it’s outgrowing the current pot that it’s in, do it a tremendous favor and repot it. (Succulents need room to grow just like you and I). If you see the roots growing out of the bottom of the planter or pot repot it.

Sometimes the plant looks squished within the current pot and this is another sign that you should repot your succulent plant so that it continues to grow healthy. It’s begging for a new home!

You don’t want to upset your succulent plant do you?

Plain and simple, you can’t remember the last time you repotted your flourishing succulent.

If it’s been days, weeks and then years since the last time you repotted (or remembered), this can be a telling sign that it’s time to switch things up.

It’s important to know that when considering repotting, it may not be necessary to actually make a change in the pot or planter itself. You may need to switch things up with the soil and placement rather than the pot or planter.

How Often Should I Repot Succulents

repotting succulents
Succulents @growingwithsucculents

All plants have a different time frames for when they mature out of their current pot, but most plants should be repotted in between 12 and 18 months. Though it’s ideal to repot your succulent plants every 12 to 18 months in order to keep it healthy, there are exceptions.

Some succulent plants can spend a few years in their planters or pots before it requires another change.

PRO TIP— Even if it’s technically not time to repot, make sure you regularly change out the soil. This is SUPER beneficial for the plant. Why? New soil has a bunch of crucial nutrients that the succulents need to survive and thrive! If the soil looks old, change things up a bit. (Change is good).

Spring is growing season for your indoor succulents. Fuel them up with a little more water and new soil. Watch them grow like the beautiful succulents you see on pinterest.

What Supplies Do I Need to Repot Succulents

A New Pot: Make sure it’s larger than the pot you’re transferring the succulent from and has a drainage hole at the bottom (very important). Spice things up a bit and get a fun new funky pot that your succulent and home will love.

New Soil: The nutrients from the new soil will make your plant thrive. Just like us, your succulent plants need rich soil (or food) to grow healthy and go about their daily lives.

A trowel: Don’t know what a trowel is? It’s that little baby shovel! Use it when removing the plant from it’s existing pot. If you’re repotting smaller succulents or propagating buds and seeds, be sure to use metal tweezers to help you plant them effectively and carefully. 

Coffee Filters : Use this to cover the drainage hole, it’s a great inexpensive solution aside from newspaper or the other materials you might use as a filter.

Riseuvo 5 Inch Terra Cotta Pots with Saucer - 6 Pack Clay Flower...
Hoffman 10404 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 4 Quarts,...
Radius Garden 16011 Root Slayer, Trowel, Red
8-12 Cup Basket Coffee Filters (Natural Unbleached, 500)
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Riseuvo 5 Inch Terra Cotta Pots with Saucer - 6 Pack Clay Flower...
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Hoffman 10404 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 4 Quarts,...
Radius Garden 16011 Root Slayer, Trowel, Red
-
8-12 Cup Basket Coffee Filters (Natural Unbleached, 500)

Last update on 2021-10-21 / Amazon

repotting succulents
repotting and propagating @succulentsuz

How to Repot Succulents

It’s time for the fun and action of this whole thing… I’m excited, are you?

The Prep Work: Make sure that a day or two before you plan on extracting the succulent from its existing pot, you water it frequently. Check the soil you will be using for the new pot and see if it seems a little dry. If it does, spray it a little bit with some water. Moisture is key in having a successful repotting process.

Step 1: Extract your succulent from the existing pot.

This step can sometimes be tricky, daunting even, but we promise it will be okay. Start by turning the plant sideways then grab the plant at the base of the stem. Tap the bottom of the container and shake it a little bit. If you have to, give the stem some nice and gentle pulls.

If your succulent plant is squished and there’s no way of safely removing the succulent plant out of the pot or planter, you might have to break it. Yes, you’d have to sacrifice the old planter for the new planter.

Gently hammer the planter not to hurt yourself in the process. Extract the beautiful and healthy succulent child you cared for deeply.

repotting succulents
adorable succulent set-up @cultivando_flores_plantas

Step 2: Root work.

Roots are obviously crucial to your succulent, so it’s important we take extra special care of them. If the plant’s roots look like they are tangled and knotted together in a bunch at the base of the plant, try to loosen them. Use your hands to loosen them! Feel free to give them a little trim too.  If you cut, tear, or even break some do not worry. This is not the end of the world. Just do your best to be careful and do this process cautiously, patiently, and calmly.

3. Removing & Replacing Potting Mix.

Remove about ⅓ of the existing old potting mix. Pour a layer of the new soil you bought, which is packed with nutrients that your succulents are going to love! Then place the plant on the new soil. Once you make sure that it’s centered, add more mix around the base of the plant until it sits straight up without you holding it. Make sure you do not put too much of the mix in the planter so that the roots can breathe!

You also do not want to put soil to the tippy top of the pot because when you try to water it, it will overflow and make a mess. (It happens to the best of us). 

4. Water your succulent.

Make sure you water your succulent well! This is a major problem if you don’t do it correctly. We wrote an article with over 2000 shares to help you understand how to water your succulents to be healthy and thriving.

Give it more water than usual, this is because it will drain through the entire pot and all of the soil.

ALSO READ:

repotting succulents
nautical succulent pots @curso_lembrancinhasplantas

There you have it! How to repot your succulent plants the right way. If you haven’t already be sure to check out our other articles, you’ll probably get a kick out of the 12 minimalistic succulent planters we have too. Or check out Air Plants vs Succulent Plants and Why is My Succulent Rotting to enhance your succulent knowledge!

Feeling inspired to own every succulent you can get your hands on?! (don’t feel bad, we do too) We have an awesome opportunity to fulfill your succulent dreams. Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today!

Thanks for reading, be sure to share your re-potting photos in our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge, where thousands of succulent lovers would love to see!

Enjoyed learning about Repotting Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about Replanting Practices to Keep Your Succulents Safe. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting!