How to Create Driftwood Planters at Home

Ceramic pots are beautiful, but they aren’t the most natural way to display your succulents and air plants. After all, air plants don’t grow in pots in nature anyways!

If you want a more natural way to show off your plants, you should plant them on driftwood. Driftwood logs make beautiful, rustic planters that will bring a little bit of the outdoors into your home.

Air plants actually grow on trees in the rainforest, so they’ll do quite well on pieces of driftwood. Succulents usually grow in soil, so you’ll need to get a little creative with your planting technique to keep them healthy. But with a few modifications, driftwood logs make a wonderful home for either succulents or air plants! Check out our more in-depth guide on Everything You Need to Know About Air Plants.

If you’d like to learn how to create driftwood planters at home without a lot of special tools, then keep reading!

But before you get started, sign up here for a FREE 30-day trial of Amazon’s Prime Membership. Get that FREE 2-day shipping on all your upcoming driftwood planter necessities!

How to Make Driftwood Planters
How to make driftwood planters at home @lylasdriftwooddreams

Planting Air Plants on Driftwood

Driftwood and air plants are the perfect pair! Air plants are epiphytes, so they don’t need soil in order to thrive. Planting them in soil is actually bad for them. Since you can’t really plant them in regular pots and planters, driftwood logs are a great alternative.

All you need to do to plant air plants on driftwood is to glue them down to the log with some clear crafting glue. You can add decorative moss around each plant to make your driftwood planter prettier, but it’s optional.

Remember to mist your air plants with a spray bottle or dunk them in some water every few days to keep them looking nice and healthy. Here’s another Succulent City article, dedicated to the watering routine for Air Plants and additional terrariums for your air plants.

How to Make Driftwood Planters
Unique aquarium driftwood planter @outoftheboxplanters

Planting Succulents on Driftwood

There are a few different ways you can plant succulents on driftwood. You can glue your succulents straight onto the driftwood log with crafting glue, but they won’t last for more than a few months because they need soil to thrive.

That’s why we like to attach our succulents to some Spanish moss or coir soil sheets before securing them them to the driftwood log. It gives them something to root in, and has some nutrients that’ll help sustain them.

To plant your succulents, grab a fistful of Spanish moss or cut out a circle of coir with some sharp scissors. Then use the crafting glue or some hot glue to attach the moss or coir to the driftwood log.

All that’s left to do now is glue your succulents onto the coir or moss and enjoy your new driftwood planter at home! Remember to water the succulents every now and then with a spray bottle.

How to Make Driftwood Planters
Bigger IS better for driftwood @lorichips

Drilling Holes to Make Driftwood Planters

You can turn your driftwood into a real planter by drilling a few holes in it. The holes don’t have to be very big because succulents don’t require a ton of soil or root space.

Taking the time to drill some holes in your driftwood is worth it. Succulents do much better when they’re planted in soil and will last for a lot longer—think years instead of months.

If you aren’t handy enough to drill holes in your driftwood log, you can try to find one that has natural crevices, like this one, that you can fill with soil. Otherwise, follow these next few steps to turn your driftwood log into a succulent planter that’s as beautiful as it is functional!

How to Make Driftwood Planters
Driftwood planters in a pot @eddiebigness

How to Drill Holes for Driftwood Planters

First, grab your power drill and fit it with a spade bit. Then take the piece of driftwood and start drilling holes up and down the length of the log. Drilling holes in wood with a spade bit can be a little tricky, so check out this article if you need some help.

The holes don’t have to be very deep or big, but place your succulents in the holes after you’ve drilled them just to make sure there’s enough space for their roots.

Next, it’s a good idea to glue some sphagnum moss (also known as peat moss) into the holes to create a moisture barrier between the driftwood and your succulents.

Then, grab some succulent soil and fill the holes to the top with it. Nestle your succulents in the soil, making sure to cover their roots. Finally, stand back and admire your hard work!

How to Make Driftwood Planters
Beautiful succulent arrangement @angemala1124

Now you have all the information you need to make beautiful driftwood planters! Would you create driftwood planters at home?—Do you like them, or are they a little too rustic for your tastes? Let us know your opinion in the comments section below or share your driftwood creations in our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge.

If you’re ready to get your succulent collection started, invest in starting your monthly succulent subscription boxes from Succulents Box! They have over 200 succulent and air plant varieties, and monthly subscriptions start at just $5! Get started, here.

Want to keep up with the succulent knowledge? Check out these articles— Do Succulents Clean the Air, Where to Buy Air Plants, and What is the Purpose of Thorns on a Cactus.

Don’t forget, we’re on Instagram and Pinterest! Give us a follow for daily succulent content that will surely inspire the inner gardener in you.

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Happy planting! ?

How to Make Your own Succulent Soil at Home

Before you get down and dirty with creating the best succulent soil at home, we wanted to let you know we were able to work with Amazon and provide our AMAZING readers a 30 day free trial to Amazon Prime perfect for all gardening and succulent stuff! The best part about this is that you can get succulent planters within days! Let us know if you’re getting anything succulent related, we’d love for you to share it in our FB group.

No doubt succulents are pretty and vibrant, but they can be quite picky at times. Unlike your average indoor plant, succulents are somewhat choosy with their soil and that’s probably what makes them so special.

Whether you’re an old pro to succulents or the new kid on the succulent- block, getting the preliminaries right the first time will go a long way in your succulent adventures. And nothing has more impact on growing succulents than the type of soil used.

Succulents, these cute, green, little aliens, don’t get along too well with the mundane, conventional gardening soil. They think it’s overrated and a bit boring. At least in its pure form.

Though succulents thrive with neglect why do they demand a more thought out type of soil you ask? Let’s find out!

Make Your Own Succulent Soil
perlite and soil @whitneykshaffer

What Type of Soil Do Succulents Need?

The word succulent means a plant possessing thick, fleshy stems and leaves primarily as an adaptation to store water. In other words, succulents are desert- denizens that have recently been tamed to spice up the living room décor, by using minimalistic planters like these, by their unique but beautiful looks.

These plants are native to the desert regions of Africa, Central America, Mexico and some parts of Europe. They have lived in the hot and dry desert all their lives and hence have a few survival hacks to combat life in the desert. One of these coveted adaptations is their ability to store water.

You see, it barely rains in the desert. And when it does, it pours— quite literally. Succulents store this water in their leaves and stems for use in the subsequent weeks before it rains again. So for succulents, their roots don’t take up water all the time as they already have enough tucked away in their leaves. This is clearly backed up by the type of soil found in the desert. It is sandy and the hot weather helps the water to drain quickly therefore succulents don’t sit on soil with needless water.

Damp soil for succulents is not only unnecessary, but it’s also dangerous as it may lead to root rot and a host of pests not to mention the fungal diseases that accompany wet soil.

So what kind of soil is cool for succulents?

how to make succulent soil at home
planting succulents @soymicroscopio

Succulent Potting Mix Checklist

The biggest threat to succulent survival is root rot. It attacks the main channel for water and nutrient uptake of the plant leading to a weak, shriveled plant. Such a plant’s fate is almost sealed –death is inevitable.

Planting your succulents in the right soil can’t be stressed enough. A good succulent potting mix should have the following components:

1. Succulent Soil Should be Well-Draining

It definitely had to be top of the list. (If you’ve been reading our recent articles, we mention this a lot because of how important it is). Succulents and damp soil is just a disastrous combination.

When making your own succulent potting mix, you want to end up with soil that will drain well and quickly. Loose and grainy soil is the perfect substrate for growing succulents.

how to make succulent soil at home
time to plant! @plantoolio

2. Your Succulent Soil Needs to Have Good Aeration

It’s important for the roots to have some space to breath. This will not only make it easier for soil and nutrients absorption, but it will also create a sustainable environment for beneficial microorganisms in the soil.

3. Non-Compacting and Breathable Succulent Soil

Sticky and compact soil is terrible for succulents. The roots hate it because it retains moisture for long periods and makes it difficult for the plant to breath.

4. Excessive Nutrients in Succulent Soil

This sounds pretty weird but it’s true. Soil containing too much nutrients, especially nitrogen, may lead to lanky, brittle and unpleasant plants. Nobody wants such kind of goofy-looking plants do they?

how to make your own succulent soil at home
succulent soil @bloomedroots

What You Need to Create Succulent Soil at Home

Let’s Get Started Making Succulent Soil

Making your own succulent mix at home is so much fun. You get to decide just how grainy you want it to be (if you care about the aesthetics). Plus, it’s a lot cheaper than the regular commercial cacti mix sold in stores.

And did I mention that the procedure is so easy?

A plethora of recipes for making succulent soil abound. However, for this guide, we’ll stick with the basic procedure that is super effective and works wonders every time!

Measuring Succulent Soil

Measuring out your ingredients is paramount to achieve the desired drainage, compactness and aeration. The best mixing ratio of the three ingredients is two parts sand, two parts gardening soil and one-part perlite or pumice.

Translating this to cups makes it 3 cups of sand, 3 cups of soil and 1.5 cups of perlite or pumice.

The purpose of pumice or perlite is to aid in aeration and drainage. Pumice is particularly useful in holding together nutrients and moisture. Either can be used or better yet combining the two ingredients to end up with a rich potting mix.

On the other hand, sand is used to make the potting mix less compact as well as to increase the drainage. As for the gardening soil, its main role is to provide nutrients for the succulents.

how to make succulent soil at home
time to make your own @lowkey_plantobsessed

Mixing Your Succulent Soil

Put on your gardening gloves and let’s get to work!

Start by slightly moistening the garden soil to prevent the dust from coming up the bucket or mixing container. Next, put in the sand and mix thoroughly. Doing this using hands is more effective. Lastly, scoop in the perlite or pumice. Give it a good stir until the mixture is uniform.

Good job! You just made your very first succulent soil! I told you it was that easy, it’s just a matter of knowing what types of ingredients to include in your succulent soil that allows your succulent to grow the best it can.

You can use this soil for potting, repotting and even store it for future use.

Tip: A neat trick before potting the succulents is to avoid getting the soil too moisturized.

You can begin watering as usual once the soil dries out completely.

how to make succulent soil at home
perfect mix @vividroot

Was making succulent soil as hard as you thought it was? Let us know in the comments below, we want to hear your thoughts. For some more tips on succulent care, check out this article here!

If there’s some tips and tricks you want to share with our succulent friends, you should let us know in the Succulent Plant Lounge — our exclusive Facebook group filled with a community of succulent lovers that chime in on each other’s posts answering popular questions about succulents and giving their insights about tips and tricks for succulent care!

Enjoyed learning about How to Make Your Own Succulent Soil at Home? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Have fun, and happy planting! ?

7 Rare Air Plants You Need in Your Home

Air plants are so cool, that even the common varieties seem rare to us!

Here’s a fun fact, all air plants can grow without any soil. Isn’t that amazing? No other plant can do that… sounds pretty rare to us already!

But today, we thought we’d share some real rare air plants with you. These plants are on the list because they’re hard to come by or because they have unusual characteristics that are just worth checking out.

If you’re a Tillandsia (air plants) collector, you’ll definitely want to get your hands on these seven rare air plants, so keep reading for some hard- to- find air plants!

7 rare air plants
rare air plants @saltyhogcreations

Tillandsia Ionantha ‘Druid’

The leaves on Tillandsia Ionantha plants usually turn bright red in direct sunlight, but this special cultivar is different. Its leaves grow in clumps and turn a beautiful orangey pink color before they bloom and after they soak up a lot of sunshine. The rest of the time, the leaves are a green color.

This cultivar also has different colored blooms than the original plant—they’re bright white instead of dark purple. We like the colors of this cultivar better because they look so tropical! Plus the bright colors just scream rare!

What do you think?

7 rare air plants
Ionantha ‘Druid’ @thegoodest

Tillandsia Tectorum

This rare air plant has a ton of white fuzz on its leaves, but it’s not mold—it’s trichomes! Trichomes are structures on the leaves of air plants that help them absorb nutrients from the air and water. Very few air plants have this many fuzzy trichomes on their leaves, so that’s what makes the Tillandsia Tectorum a rare air plant!

This plant may look like it’s covered in snow, but it’s actually native to the deserts of Peru. It does quite well in the heat and doesn’t need much water to thrive. Its abundance of fuzzy trichomes help it absorb and store lots of water, just like succulents!

We recommend you check out our watering air plants article if you’re unsure of how much water you need to give your air plants, which isn’t that much at all.

7 rare air plants
Tectorum @naobon_

Tillandsia Cacticola

This rare air plant got the name “Cacticola” because it grows on cacti—how cool is that! It’s hard to find because it doesn’t produce very many offsets unfortunately, but it’s worth tracking one down.

It produces beautiful lavender blooms that grow on a long stem high above the plant. The flowers last for a few months, which is a little unusual for a flowering air plant, so you’ll get to enjoy them for a while!

This plant is prized for its flowers, but we think its leaves are pretty cool too. They’re silvery green, slightly curly, and form a pretty rosette.

Tillandsia Cacticola plants are native to northern Peru, so they like moderate humidity, plenty of bright, indirect sunlight, and warm temperatures. If you do manage to get your hands on one, remember to take good care of it!

7 rare air plants
Cacticola @tillymandias

Tillandsia lonantha ‘Fuego’

“Fuego” means fire in Spanish if you didn’t know, and these little air plants sure are fiery! They turn bright red before they bloom and retain that color for a few months after, which is unusual. Usually air plants revert back to their original color shortly after blooming, which is why we’re calling this cultivar a rare air plant!

These plants only grow to be two inches tall, so they’re great for small terrariums. Check these hanging terrariums out from Mkono, they’re so cool and the perfect size for these tiny fiery air plants!

Even though they’re small, they’ll be the star of your plant collection with their bright red leaves and vibrant purple, yellow, and red blooms! Especially if you use those terrariums we mentioned, they’ll be the star of the room or home!

Tillandsia Streptophylla

Tillandsia Streptophylla plants are known for their beautiful, curly leaves. Their nickname is actually Shirley Temple (not to be mistaken from the cocktail) because their curly clumps of leaves look a lot like her hair!

Tillandsia Streptophylla plants are native to Central America, Mexico and the West Indies, so they’re used to drier climates. They’re considered to be xeric plants, so they retain water well and don’t need to be watered too often. If you’re guilty of frequently forgetting to water your plants, then this is the one for you!

This rare air plant is especially hard to find in a large size, so bonus points if you can track down a jumbo one! If you get your hands on a Tillandsia Streptophylla that is quite large, let us see it in the Succulent City Plant Lounge, i’m sure all the exclusive members would love to see your beautiful plant!

Tillandsia Funckiana V. Recurvifolia

This is the rarest variety of Tillandsia Funckiana, and we can see why! Its leaves are extremely unique and look like pine branches. Its leaves also recurve, or bend backward, which is how this variety got the name “Recurvifolia.” Neat, huh?

Tillandsia Funckiana plants are native to Venezuela, so they like bright, indirect sunlight and warm temperatures. They’re pretty hardy, though, so they’re good plants for people who don’t have the greenest thumbs!

Tillandsia Bulbosa Belize

This large rare air plant got its name because of its round, bulbous base. It has smooth, wavy leaves that remind us of snakes. A lot of people say this plant looks like a sea creature, though! Not sure if that’s scary or awesome…

This Tillandsia is native to Belize and is another one that’s hard to kill. It doesn’t need very much water—you can get away with misting it twice a week. The only thing it doesn’t handle well is low light, so make sure you put it in a bright corner of your home! If your home is lacking sunlight but you want to keep this plant indoors, you might need to bring on the handy grow light from a reputable company like Ankace.


Those are the seven rare air plants that we think you need to complete your air plant collection!

Which one is your favorite? We love the Tillandsia Tectorum because it looks like it’s covered in snow! Let us know which ones you love in the comments section below or join the conversation in the Succulent City Plant Lounge.

Thanks for reading about these rare air plants, if you know an air plant that deserves to be on this list, please don’t be shy, let us know below!

Enjoyed learning about 7 Rare Air Plants You Need in Your Home? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about Rare Succulents You Wish You Knew About. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting! ?

How to Successfully Grow Indoor Succulents

Succulents form the bulk of houseplants around the green thumb community. If you didn’t know already, it’s not a secret anymore – succulents are really popular.

Like… Really. Popular.

And they aren’t just suited for your garden or porch, they’re more versatile. Succulent plants are perfect ornamental beings to spruce up your interior decor in unique ways – think about the shapes, colors and sizes. It’s almost endless.

That’s already a good enough reason to grow indoor succulents. But you know what, I want to share more with our lovely Succulent Family, let’s get to it!

how to grow indoor succulents
it’s a succ world, after all @urbanbotanistuk

3 Reasons to Grow Indoor Succulents

1. Indoor Succulents are Easy to Care for

You’re probably already keeping tabs on lots of stuff in your life. It’s a normal thing in life right?

So the last thing you’d wish for is a plant that demands more of your already scarce attention.

But it’s just better if that plant could brace the occasional neglect so all your time isn’t occupied completely with succulents, as much as we’d like that to be the case. Plus, a succulent fairs quite well with neglect anyways, their maintenance requirement isn’t too much.

In other words, you don’t need to dedicate lots of your time to successfully grow indoor succulents. You’ll see this as you read more, let’s continue!

how to grow succulents indoors
succulents indoors @urbanbotanistuk

2. Succulents have Low Space Demands & Requirements

Succulents are compact plants by nature (pun intended) – for a larger part. They can stay in their assigned spots for a good deal of time indoors so long as they’re in the right circumstances with sunlight, soil mix and watering.

The compactness of indoor succulents is huge, especially if you have a preference for renting apartments, like most millennials for example.

If any reason, the lack of space commitment growing indoor succulents can’t be a better reason to grow indoor succulents and spice up your already beautiful apartment or home. Check out these space- saving wall planters!

how to grow succulents indoors
buy the succulents! @urbanbotanistuk

3. A Way to Connect with Nature

As part of the urban setting, you’re more or less surrounded by technology a majority of the time. At your work place and back at your house. And most likely, nurturing a garden is out of question unless you’re already a thriving green thumb.

So how do you get to experience a connection with the natural? Or, may be, something close to that?

We’d recommended something like growing indoor succulents.

How to Grow Indoor Succulents

Succulents are super easy to grow! But even with this simplicity, there are guidelines to be adhered to. Here is a few to help you successfully grow indoor succulents.

how to grow succulents indoors
succulent desk display @urbanbotanistuk

Go for Ideal Succulent Varieties

It’s true that succulents can grow anywhere.

But to get the best results out of your plants, arbitrarily choosing species won’t cut it, unfortunately.

For beaming plants, select succulent species that are ideal for indoor growth. Plus, it makes your work a lot easier.

Aside from that, it also helps if you define what you’re looking for in your indoor succulents.

Whatever it is, to grow indoor succulents that serve in the way you want, give some thought to the types that you choose to go with.

how to grow succulents indoors
home sweet home @home_sweet_home_46

For a general case, here are common indoor succulents and full guides we’ve written on how to take care of them:

(We have a few articles throughout Succulent City of guides for how to take care of some of the listed succulents above, don’t forge to check them out!)

how to grow succulents indoors
pretty in pink @rainbow_garden_

Give Enough Space for Indoor Succulents

This is very essential especially in case you want to grow indoor succulents in a single planter. Individual plants should have enough space for air circulation.

But most importantly, ample space allows each one of them access to enough light – an equally significant aspect.

Provide Ideal Lighting Conditions for Indoor Succulents

You don’t want your babies to end up with elongated stems, pale and bent. That’s their likely fate indoors where the amount of light is considerably reduced. And that means you have to be on the look to grow indoor succulents in their intended forms – colors and sizes.

Be sure to place them near a sun-lit window up to 6 hours per day. If that isn’t an option, place your plant in the brightest location in the room.

For both of the above cases, make a point of rotating the pot every now and then so that the plant isn’t getting light from one direction. You’ll curb stretching out that way if you consider this, no need for etiolated plants here!

Don’t think your home could provide ideal lighting for your plant? Try this dimmable plant light with a timer!

how to grow succulents indoors
perfect table centerpiece @home_sweet_home_46

For Potting, Clay is the Way to Go

Indoor spaces are already clogged up as far as free air circulation is concerned. And using a glass container doesn’t help the situation – for the roots. Same for succulent terrariums, they look really nice but for long term care it is not the ideal situation for indoor succulents.

For clay, the aeration is just the perfect addition to successfully grow indoor succulents. First off, it helps the potting medium dry out faster; something that your succulents will thank you for as water-logged soils isn’t exactly their bread and butter.

Secondly, the roots will get a fresh air supply for as long as they are in that pot. And that boosts not just their health but also that of the plant. And who won’t be happy to grow indoor succulents that are good-looking?

how to grow succulents indoors
ultimate wall decor @thosearesucculent

Keep a Well-Draining Soil Mix

For those that don’t know, you don’t want to fill up the pot with regular potting soil, it’s not ideal for your succulent babies! Yes, succulents are houseplants, but with a preference for a dry medium.

Regular potting soil doesn’t guarantee this dryness as they retain too much moisture for succulent plants. In fact, your plant will surely die if it were to stay in that soil for some time.

The best soil mix to grow indoor succulents in should drain out quickly. Get a commercial cactus/succulent mix that is perfect for this.

Alternatively, you can put together your own well-draining mix by combining quantities of regular soil mix, coarse sand and pumice. It will still serve you as the commercial option above in your bid to grow indoor succulents.

how to grow succulents indoors
triangular succulent terrarium @otthoneskertdesign

Be Lenient on Watering Indoor Succulents

Your indoor succulents could do with some water, but not too much of it. Succulents are delicate when it comes to water, be mindful of this!

To grow indoor succulents to their full glory, spread out your watering over long periods to allow the soil mix to dry out, completely.

You can use your finger to ascertain if it’s time to give your plant a drink. Gently dig into the soil mix and feel for any presence of moisture. It should be dry before you think of going ahead with the watering.

And when doing it, go all in. Give your succulent plant a heavy shower until the water flows out through the drainage holes at the bottom.

Also, if it’s winter season reduce watering to once or twice a week. You don’t need gallons of water to grow indoor succulents. Let’s just say succulents are also water bill friendly!

how to grow succulents indoors
succulents in baby watering cans @duterte.art

Be Hard on Pests

Pests are going to have a smooth ride with the general calmness indoors. And you know what will happen if you allow them to reign supreme.

Outdoor succulents can be saved with the winds, rain or irrigation. But to grow indoor succulents without the bother of these little rioters, it’s important that you be vigilant. Observe the leaves and stems of your succulents for any of them and take immediate action when you see them.

They include mealybugs, spider mites and scale insects. A mixture of rubbing alcohol and water is a perfect killer. Use a piece of cotton to apply the mixture on the affected areas. That’s how you grow indoor succulents devoid of pests.

Careful Where You Place Your Plants

Generally, place your plants in places with a guaranteed constant temperature. So you’ll want to avoid keeping them near electronics and at the doors.

Grow indoor succulents away from these places if you wish to have healthy plants.

how to grow succulents indoors
garden of succulents @motherofblooms

That’s really it! You don’t have to commit a lot of time and effort to successfully grow indoor succulents. Caring is just as simple as following the steps you just read above.

A bit of neglect and the right growing conditions, your succulents will thrive beautifully indoors. If you have any questions, ask our experts in the Succulent Plant Lounge.

Enjoyed learning about How to Successfully Grow Indoor Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Have fun sprucing up your home, and happy planting! ?

6 Best Indoor Succulents

When it comes to being a plant parent, succulents are easy fan favorites. Most types of succulents are easy to take care of, requiring relatively little attention compared to flowers and other houseplants.

And though succulents are a great, low-maintenance way to bring some green life into your home, some species of succulents are rather fussy when it comes to the amount of sunlight and temperatures they need to survive, while others can’t deal with the dry air that comes with being indoors.

Worse, some succulents are even known to be toxic to animals, so even though they might thrive in indoor environments, they might not be the best roommates for your furry friends.

Luckily, some succulents were seemingly made to sit atop your mantle without posing any threats to your animals or needing much effort when it comes to their watering schedules and positioning in the sun. Check out the best indoor succulents to add to your collection.

1. Burro’s Tail (Sedum morganianum)

Hanging Burros Tail Succulent Plant
Burro’s Tail Succulent Image: @plant.heart.city

The Burro’s Tail succulent is unlike the short, stubby plants you might picture when you hear the word “succulent.” As it ages, it gets pretty leggy, making it a great hanging plant as opposed to one you might place on a table or mantle. Even so, the Burro’s Tail thrives indoors where temperatures remain around the 70s. According to Nell at Joy Us Garden, a Burro’s Tail does need at least 4 hours of sun a day, but bright shade or partial sun will do. Plus, the ASPCA reports that this succulent won’t do your pets any harm.

2. Haworthia

Potted Haworthia Succulent Plant in Bucket Planter
Haworthia Image: @hinterland_plants

According to Baylor Chapman, author and founder of florist company Lila B. Design, Haworthias are “tough, tough, tough” — in a good way, of course. According to Our House Plants, Haworthias can survive through just about anything, and even tolerate periods of neglect pretty well (meaning you can go on vacation without checking in to make sure your friends remember to come over and care for it). They do best without a lot of direct sunlight and are perfectly fine in average temperatures.

At only around three to five inches tall, the small plant can pretty much go anywhere in your house without having to be repotted. And though its relative, Aloe Vera, is very poisonous to both humans and animals if ingested, the Haworthia is a safe indoor companion.

3. Copper Spoons (Kalanchoe orgyalis)

Copper Spoons Succulent Plant
Copper Spoons Succulent Image: @ecophilia

What sets this this taller, tree-like plant apart from other succulents is its velvety copper leaves. It has a high heat-tolerance, so you can place it in those full-sun spots in your house that many other plants can’t handle. Plus, “it’s indestructible!” Flora Grubb Gardens garden designed Daniel Nolan told Sunset. “You can go on vacation for a month and not kill it.” Though Copper Spoons can apparently get up to a meter tall, they’re slow growers and when grown indoors, remain relatively small.

4. Echeveria

Echeveria Succulent Plant Close Up
Echeveria Succulent Plant Image: @erikassucculents

According to Certified Urban Agriculturalist Bonnie L. Grant, “Echeveria care is practically foolproof.” It doesn’t get much better than that! Youngs Garden Shop explains that these succulents prefer placement in bright filtered light, such as natural sunlight through a window, and urges keeping it in that same spot as “dramatic changes in lighting can stress plants out.” They don’t need any fertilizer and you only have to water them once the soil is dry, so your life with an Echeveria will be pretty stress-free!

5. Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

Ponytail Palm Succulent Plant
Ponytail Palm Image: @jensjunglelife

If you love the look of palm trees but don’t live in the right climate, consider a Ponytail Palm. Though they are a type of succulent, their long leaves and thin trunk are deceiving! Like palm trees, Ponytails do best in full sun but are capable of surviving in lower light as well — it just might not get as large. Though Ponytails can reach about eight feet tall fully grown, they don’t need to be repotted and don’t require much watering.

6. Air Plant

Hanging Air Succulent Plant
Air Succulent Plant Image: @botanicalware

For those who can’t stand the thought of having to clean up any stray clumps of dirt in the house, you’re gonna love this: Air Plants can grow without soil. Seriously! According to Nell at Joy Us Garden, these special succulents grow by attaching themselves to other plants (but don’t worry — they’re not parasitic). They thrive in bright, indirect light, and as for temps, they like it pretty close to the same way we all do — below 90 and above freezing. Simple.

When it comes to watering, Air Plants do differ a bit from your typical succulents. You can easily spray them with water from a spray bottle, which you should do about one to two times a week, depending on how dry or humid the air in your house is. “But what they really like is to be soaked,” according to Nell from Joy Us Garden, a process that will keep your Air Plant happy for as long as two weeks. “The best way to water an air plant is to submerge it in a dish of water for 12 hours,” according to HGTV. “Air plants only take up as much water as they need, so you won’t overwater by doing this.”

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