All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents

All you need to know about stonecrop succulents

Stonecrop succulents, also known as Sedums, are a hardy little group of plants that are perfect for outdoor gardens! They can survive in below freezing temperatures, poor soil conditions, and hot, sunny weather. No matter what growing zone you live in or where you plant them in your garden, they’ll be able to thrive!

Sedums come in colors like green, red, purple, and yellow. They usually produce yellow, pink, or white blooms that attract birds and butterflies. They’re just as pretty as they are hardy, so they’re fantastic plants to have in your garden!

Caring for sedums is pretty easy, but you’ll still need a few essential tips—so keep reading!

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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Origins

Most varieties of sedum are native to Europe and Asia, so they can handle a temperate climate. Sedum is grown in many gardens in North American today because of their cold hardiness and pretty appearance. Sedum has beautiful, showy flowers and glossy leaves in colors like green, blue, maroon, purple, orange, and gold.

Most varieties of sedum are creeping, which means that they spread out as they grow and fill up bare spaces in gardens. Some varieties of sedum, though, are tall. Tall varieties grow up instead of out and get to be about 2 or 3 feet high. They’re prized for their beautiful flowers!

Caring for Sedums

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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By now we’ve probably convinced you that you need some beautiful stonecrop succulents in your garden, so now you need to learn how to care for them! Well, we’ve got your back! You’ll have no problem caring for sedums even if you have a black thumb as long as you follow these tips.

Soil Requirements

The easiest way to kill a sedum is to let it sit in water! Planting sedums in porous soil that drains quickly helps prevent water from pooling and damaging their roots.

If you’re planting your stonecrops in pots, make sure that you use ones with drainage holes and fill them with a porous succulent soil.

If you’re planting stonecrop succulents out in your garden, you should test the soil to make sure it drains quickly enough before you put the succulents in the ground. To do this, dig a hole that’s a foot deep and fill it with water. If the water drains in thirty minutes or less, your soil is ready for your stonecrops! If not, you’ll need to mix three inches of something gritty, like perlite or sand, into the soil to make it more porous.

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Water Requirements

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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Overwatering is another major cause of death for stonecrop succulents! Stonecrop succulents that are kept outside don’t need a whole lot of water. During the winter when they’re dormant, they may not need any water at all if your area gets rainfall. During the spring, summer, and fall, you’ll only need to water them once a week if they’re a tall variety. Creeping sedums can get by on even less water.

If you’re growing sedum indoors, your plants will need more water than ones kept outside. We recommend that you water your sedums about once a week during the spring through fall. During the winter, cut back on watering your plants. Once every three to four weeks should be sufficient—you only want to water them enough to keep their leaves from drying out and puckering.

Before you water your sedums, make sure the soil is completely dry. You can test this by sticking your finger about an inch deep into the soil. If it’s wet, put down the watering can! If it feels dry, your succulent is thirsty and needs a drink, so proceed with watering!

You should follow the soak and dry method when watering your sedums. To do this, grab your watering can and pour water onto the soil until it starts running out of the drainage holes of the pot. If your sedums are outdoors, pour enough water on the soil until it feels wet about an inch down. Don’t water your plants again until the soil feels completely dry to avoid overwatering them!

Light and Temperature Requirements

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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Outdoors, sedums can thrive no matter where you put them in the garden. You can plant them in partial shade or full sun and they’ll do well. Here’s some great outdoor pots if you don’t plan to have them in the regular ground or soil. Our team member has one of these bad boys actually!

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Indoors, sedums need bright sunlight, so keep them near the sunniest window in your home or under a grow light.

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As for temperature, sedums are pretty hardy. Most varieties can survive in below freezing temperatures of negative twenty or thirty degrees, so they’re the perfect outdoor succulents for cold growing zones. No need for ridiculous plant covers!

Fertilizer Requirements

Stonecrops don’t absolutely need fertilizer. Since they can survive in poor soil conditions, they don’t need extra nutrients from fertilizer to keep growing. If you want to save money or time, it’s a step you can skip.

But if you want your stonecrops to be the healthiest they can be (we know you do!), then they’ll benefit from a few applications of diluted fertilizer during the spring, summer or fall.

Diluting water-soluble fertilizer is easy—just use half as much fertilizer as the directions call for. So if the back of the box says to dissolve 1 tablespoon of fertilizer in a gallon of water, you should only use ½ tablespoon.

If you’d rather not use chemical fertilizer, you can apply a layer of organic compost to the soil once during the fall.

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Last update on 2021-01-19 / Amazon

Propagating Sedum

Succulent propagation can seem kind of intimidating, but propagating a sedum is super easy! All you have to do to be able to grow brand new plants is take a couple of stem cuttings. We promise your sedum won’t even notice those stems are missing!

To take some cuttings, grab a sharp garden knife and cut the stem of your sedum below the leaves. You want the whole cutting to be at least three inches long, so keep that in mind when you’re cutting the stem.

Any leaves on the bottom inch of the cutting should be stripped, and then the cutting should be planted in some moist succulent soil. You should keep the soil just barely moist at all times over the next week or two. You can mist the soil with a spray bottle to keep it damp. Once the cuttings take root you can water them normally, just like you would any other sedum.

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Make sure you keep your cuttings in a place with bright but indirect sunlight. Sedums can’t handle harsh sunlight or freezing temps until they’ve matured and grown a bit!

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All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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Now that you know all about stonecrop succulents, are you going to plant any in your garden? Let us know in the comments section below!

If you already have these and want to ask specific questions in how to care for them even more, be sure to ask our exclusive members for TIPS and TRICKS that they find to be super useful. (It helps our team members a lot).

Enjoyed learning about All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting! ?

How to Grow Hens and Chicks Succulents

How to Grow Hens and Chicks

Growing hens and chicks (Sempervivum tectorum) plants in your garden is quite simple, especially if you want a lot of them. Their offsets keep coming!

Hens and chicks have beautiful rosettes that come in colors like red, green, blue, and copper. They grow like nobody’s business and produce tons of baby plants cutely called chicks, so it’s likely that you’ll never have to buy more than one Hen.

Hens and chicks are easy to care for and can thrive indoors or outdoors, so they’re the perfect plant for pretty much everyone!

If you want to keep your Sempervivum tectorum looking like spring chickens, then you’re going to need our advice! Find out how to grow hens and chicks in your own garden.

How to Grow Hens and Chicks Succulents
Growing hens and chicks (Sempervivum tectorum) plants is quite simple, especially if you want a lot of them. Their offsets keep coming! @joske.anoebis.goa

Hens and chicks

I bet you’re probably wondering why this plant has such a weird name! It’s called hens and chicks or hens and chickens because it produces a lot of offsets, which are also known as chicks.

In case you didn’t know, offsets are baby succulents that sprout from mature plants, in this case, called Hen. The mother plant “hatches” baby chicks just like a hen does, so that’s how it got its quirky name hens and chicks!

Binomial nomenclatureSempervivum tectorum
Other namesHens and chicks, hen and chickens, hen-and-chicks, hens-and-chickens, houseleek, roof houseleek, hen-widdies
SizeThey can grow up to be up to 4 inches tall
pH6.6 to 7.5
SunFull Sun to Part Sun
ClimateCold Hardy, Winter Vegetables
Growing LocationsThroughout the US
GroundSandy, Excellent Drainage
WaterLow, Drought Tolerant

Sempervivum tectorum

Hens and chicks are also called Sempervivum tectorum. Serpevivum means “always living” in Latin. Sempervivum plants got this name because they sprout many offsets that live on after the mother plant dies.

Sempervivums are also called houseleeks because they used to be planted on thatched roofs to keep them from catching on fire during lightning storms. They store a lot of water in their leaves, so it makes sense that they would prevent fires from spreading.

How to care

Hens and chicks are native to the mountains of Europe, so they’ve adapted to cold weather and are considered a winter vegetable. Even though they’re tough and can withstand less than ideal conditions, there are still a few things you need to know to keep them healthy. Here are some of our best caretaking tips for hens and chicks.

The best soil

If you’ve read our other plant guides, you already know that you need to put your plants in well-draining soil. We talk about drainage so often because it’s super important!

If your hens and chicks get waterlogged, it may get mushy leaves, start to attract pests, or die from root rot. Nobody wants that!

Planting your succulent in cactus or succulent soil will prevent your plant from sitting in water and meeting an untimely end. Commercial succulent soil is a good choice because it contains porous materials like perlite and pumice that improve drainage and keep your plant nice and dry.

We highly recommend this soil mix as it is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. We like to get a large bag as we propagate a lot of plants. It is useful to always have soil on hand for any plant project.

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Hoffman Horticultural Perlite, 18 Quarts, Size: Single
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Price not available
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Nature's Footprint Pumice Soil amendment, 3-Gallon
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Last update on 2021-01-19 / Amazon

 

How to water

Watering your hens and chicks plants every two weeks is usually enough, but watch out for signs of under watering like dry, wrinkly leaves.

Fill up a watering can and douse the soil until water runs out of the pot’s drainage hole. In between these deep waterings, let the plant’s ground dry out completely.

Doing this encourages your hens and chicks to develop a healthy root system because its roots will grow deeper as it searches the soil for more water. Letting the soil dry out also prevents root rot.

Light requirements

Hens and chicks can handle anything from partial shade to full sun. Their fleshy leaves are a bit delicate and can burn during the hottest months of the year, so if you keep your succulent outdoors, watch out for signs of sunburn like brown, faded, or crispy leaves.

It’s a good idea to invest in some shade cloth to keep your outdoor succulents cooler on hot days. You should also water your plants more frequently during hot weather to cool down the soil.

Temperature and climate

Hens and chicks are cold hardy plants, which means they can survive in below-freezing temperatures. Even if the temperature drops to negative 40 degrees, your plant baby will still be ok. Sempervivum tectorum can thrive in winters thanks to their cold-hardy attributes.

A lot of plants can’t handle temps like that—the water they store in their leaves freezes from the cold and make the leaves brown and mushy. Their ability to survive in cold weather is just one of the many things that make Hens and Chicks remarkable!

Even though this succulent is cold-hardy, it grows best in mild temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees. So growing hens and chicks indoors is not only possible, but also good for them as long as they get enough light.

Keep them near a bright window like the south or east-facing window for the best results.

Fertilizing

Hens and chicks can survive in nutritionally poor ground, so you don’t absolutely need to fertilize them. You probably want your plant to grow more quickly and look more vibrant, though, so you should fertilize it once every month or two during the spring and summer.

The best fertilizer for hens and chicks is a low-balanced, water-soluble fertilizer. Low-balanced fertilizers are milder and have less of a chance of burning the leaves of your plant. When you’re buying a fertilizer, look for one that has three small, identical numbers on the package, like 8-8-8.

Even though you’re using a mild fertilizer, you should still dilute it to half strength. Hens and chicks don’t need as much fertilizer as other plants, so you don’t want to give yours as much as the package calls for. Standard fertilizers generally call for 1 tablespoon of fertilizer per gallon of water, but you should only use ½ tablespoon.

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Do Hens and Chicks Bloom?

Some succulents use up all of their resources in order to produce flowers and seeds, which leaves nothing for the rest of the plant. Succulents that die after they flower are called monocarpic succulents.

Hens and chicks flower and die after about three or four years. Your plant may flower earlier if it’s under stress from not getting enough water or sunlight. It flowers early to try and spread its seed in the hopes that the new plants will grow somewhere with better conditions. Even if you take care of your plant perfectly, though, it will eventually flower and die.

When this happens to your hens and chicks, try not to be upset! You can save the seeds from the flowers and plant them to grow brand new babies.

Plus, your main plant probably produced a lot of chicks before it died that will grow and take its place.

Growing and Propagating

Hens and Chicks have no trouble growing and propagating on their own, but if you want even more plants, you can grow them from seed. You can harvest seeds from your mature plant after it flowers or purchase them online.

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Mother plant

If you’d rather not go to the trouble of growing succulents yourself (we don’t blame you), your hens and chicks plant will do the work for you. It produces lots of offsets that you can divide from the mother plant and put in their own pots.

Growing from Seeds

Grab a pot or planting tray and fill it up with some succulent or cactus soil.

With clean hands, take the seeds of hens and chicks and place them on top of the soil. Since the seeds are so tiny, it can be hard to see where you’re putting them, so just do your best to space them out a little.

After they’re in the soil, make sure you remember to mist them with some water. Keep them moist over the next few weeks until they germinate. Give them access to plenty of sunlight and keep them in a warm room that’s between 70 and 75 degrees if you can.

It’s unlikely that all of your seeds will germinate, so keep that in mind. Don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t work out the first time… keep trying!

Dividing Offsets

Hens and chicks seeds don’t always produce new plants that look like the mature plant they came from. If you want your chicks to retain the characteristics of your hen, the best way to do that is by dividing offsets.

Most hens and chicks varieties grow offsets from a stem that’s attached to the mother plant. That stem is called a stolon. It’s best to wait until the stolon withers to replant these offsets. By the time the stolon withers, the offsets will have developed root systems of their own and have the best chance of surviving.

To separate this kind of offset, break or cut the stolon and carefully loosen the soil around the chick. Lift it up out of the soil and transplant it to a pot filled with succulent soil or a new spot in your garden. Wait a few days to water them so that they get a chance to adjust to their new environment.

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There you have it! Those are all the things you need to know to become an expert hens and chicks gardener.

If you’d like this guide you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Even if you think you have a black thumb, don’t chicken out! Go buy yourself one. We know you’ll do a great job taking care of it. Happy planting!

What Causes Succulent Rotting and How to Prevent it?

Why is My Succulent Rotting?

If you’ve taken care of a succulent for quite some time now, you know that at least every succulent enthusiast will eventually encounter rotting. It’s like a right of passage if you will. Guess you’re staring at it right now, that’s why you’re here! Don’t beat yourself up over it, it happens— trust us.

Rotting can be such a motivation- drain, especially when you’ve been doing your best to have a beaming succulent plant. Why does it happen?

Is it because of a random disease in succulents?  Pest attacks- like those dang mealy bugs?

What exactly causes succulent rotting?

why is my succulent rotting
succulent freckles @succswithoutyou

Why Your Succulent is Rotting

A succulent can end up rotting for a couple of reasons. Continue reading and we’ll outline the reasons for you!

The Cold Winter Season

The first one is the winter cold. Yes, as much as succulents are termed as hardy with a tolerance for extreme conditions, not all of them can bare the combination of frost and low temperatures. Leave them outside during the cold months and rotting is what they’ll do. Here’s our guide on How to Take Care for Succulents in the Winter.

Avoid this scenario and get yourself a grow light, like this one! Bring your succulent babies inside and keep them warm with you during the cold, winter months. Aside from this grow light, check out our article on the additional Best Grow Lights Reviewed by Succulent Lovers.

why is my succulent rotting
brittle baby @inas_eden

Overwatering Your Succulents

The second one is overwatering. The most common. If you just started planting succulents you’re probably already doing it. For the caring soul you are, watering is something high up on your list as far your plants are concerned. You do it with your all but you have to be mindful when watering your succulents.

Being the houseplants that thrive with a bit more neglect, compared to other houseplants, you need to be a bit more conservative with your watering.

That will be great for any other of your plants except succulents. Plenty of water is a sure way of killing those babies. Because as soon as rotting kicks in, the damage is done. Saving the plant is still an option but not in the way you envision.

More on that later though. In the meantime, let us help with our article When You Should Water Your Succulent.

why is my succulent rotting
stop over watering @leafyroomies

The Wrong Succulent Soil Mix

And finally, your regular potting soil. If you didn’t get this aspect right during the potting stage, then it doesn’t matter how little you water your plant. The water will still be around for periods that aren’t ideal for a succulent.

The right succulent soil mix needs to be well-draining. Your succulent stores the water it needs within its leaves, so any access water that remains in its soil is only going to become harmful for your little baby. Here’s succulent soil mix we swear by. Give it a try if you haven’t already!

Those reasons aside, how do you tell that it’s rot you’re dealing with? It’s important to be sure so as to not end up applying the wrong remedy.

Before we continue… We’re just so excited to share with you about our sponsorship with Amazon! And to celebrate, they’re offering a FREE 30-day trial of their Amazon Prime Membership… You know, the membership where you can get FREE 2-day shipping on all your succulent needs?! Click this link to learn more and sign up today!

Okay… back to succulents.

why is my succulent rotting
get yourself the right potting mix @succulent_journey

Diagnosing Rotting in Your Succulent Plant

Rotting, especially due to being overly generous with water, has unique tell-tale signs. For an overwatered succulent

Consider these as precursors to rotting.

Here’s what you’ll see when the plant is really in the red as far as rotting is concerned:

  • Dark brown to black spots appear around the stem area
  • The affected parts become swollen and acquire a black coloration.
  • If the rotting has kicked off from the roots, the plant comes off as unhealthy with droopy leaves.
why is my succulent rotting
splitting Jade leaves @the_orchid_queen

Can a Rotting Succulent Be Saved?

That depends on the extent of the rot. If it is just a few roots that had started to catch on, simply cutting them off will salvage the plant— here’s a trimming set that will come in handy! But if the rotting is present in a larger part of the root ball and the stem, it’s farewell for your succulent – well, to some extent.

Not to worry though. Thanks to the ease of propagation of succulents, you can still end up with a new plant of the same kind. To do this, only pick out the parts that aren’t affected by the rot and set them up in a well-draining soil mix.

In both severe and mild rotting attacks, be sure to keep the following in mind:

  • Use a fresh potting mix. Even if the previous was well-draining, don’t include it in propagation or repotting. That will be a zero-sum undertaking.
  • If you’re going to use the same pot, clean it thoroughly. Get another if you don’t trust your idea of thoroughness. If you’re in need of some new planters, these are adorable, but read on here for 12 stunning succulent planters that are a MUST.
  • Any rotting part is cut off, no matter how small or insignificant it may appear. Only explicitly healthy parts should be considered. That way, you eliminate the possibility of the same problem recurring.
  • The cutting tool should be clean (possibly sterilized) and sharp. Jagged parts and infections aren’t exactly needed here (or anywhere else).
  • Cut parts should be left to dry out before being inserted into any medium.
why is my succulent rotting
let’s save your babies @terracottacorner

Preventative Measure for Rotting Succulents

It will be utterly useless for you to eliminate rotting parts and propagate a new succulent plant, and still end up with the same problem. So, after separating the good from the bad, your care routine should incorporate the following to keep rotting at bay.

A Well-Draining Potting Mix

Your regular potting soil is great. But not with a succulent. That’s if you want a healthy beaming succulent plant. Long periods of wet soil won’t assure you of this.

So, grab a commercial cactus/succulent mix. Or tweak the drainage capabilities of that regular potting soil by adding sand and pumice/perlite.

why is my succulent rotting
succulent lover’s dream patio @minigardens_minsk_brest

Ideal Watering Frequency

If you’ve been too heavy-handed with watering, it’s time to go easy. Remember: too much water is the leading cause of rotting in a succulent plant.

So, how easy should you go so as not to kill your succulent?

Let the top part of the mix be your guide. This top part should be allowed to dry out completely, between watering sessions, ideally 1-2 inches down the mix.

Keep in mind the growing seasons too. Periods of growth need water (not too much of it) while in dormancy, the amount reduces considerably. That means keeping up with a uniform watering routine can still turn out to be detrimental. So, use the above guidelines during seasons like summer and spring, and cut back during winter.

Use a Clay Pot

Well, if you can help it. Clay is so much better aerated which is a major boost to the drying rate of the potting mix. This gives the succulent roots great breathing space and hence reduces the chances of rotting by a huge margin.

Get your clay pots, here. They’d also be great to try DIY painting activities with!

For any other pot type, ensure the drainage holes at the bottom are large enough to let off the water as easily as possible.

why is my succulent rotting
grow baby, grow @succulentheaven21

Obey the Succulent Hardiness Value

Very vital if you’re growing your succulents outdoors. All factors adhered to, rotting is still imminent if you’re keeping a succulent in the cold when it should be inside.

So, know your zone. Know the zone your plant is suited for. Can it brace the cold and the accompanying frost? If not, bring it inside as soon as winter kicks in.

Knowing your zone (and that of the plant) is as easy as logging on to the USDA plant hardiness zone Map and typing in the name of your area.

The main reason why your succulent will rot is too much water. But it shouldn’t be the end of your plant. Just cut up the affected parts and start over again. This time around, be sure to adopt good care routines above so that you’re not stuck into an endless loop.

ALSO READ:

why is my succulent rotting
no rotting here @succulentlovestory

Have you been through the rotting cycle of succulents and have some additional tips for us, drop a comment down below, or join our Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge, and share your thoughts there!

We have dozens of helpful guides on ensuring you become a good succulent parent you can be! Give our articles like, Can Succulents Survive in My Work Environment and Your Ultimate Guide on How to Take Care of Air Plants, a look today and get inspired!

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on The Correct Way to Water Succulents or even Succulent Drainage Requirements today!

Thanks for reading, happy planting!?

What You Should Know About Dolphin Succulent

Dolphin Succulents Succulent City

One of the wonderful things about succulents is their sheer variance in shape, texture, and color. Every now and then the succulent community online stumbles upon new rare succulent species that captures the imagination of succulent enthusiasts and hobbyists.

Some of these are truly quirky. Like the bunny succulent or Monilaria Moniliformis that stole our hearts a few years ago. It was popular because when sprouting, its leaves that stemmed from the base made it look a lot like a bunny with long ears.

Another example of a botanical like animal is the octopus agave, a plant that has long leaves that twist around like octopus tentacles. Well now, succulent lovers rejoice! There’s a new plant in town: The dolphin succulent.

What are Dolphin Succulents

Senecio Peregrinus @urbanjungling

Otherwise known as flying dolphins, the dolphin necklace, or by its scientific name Senecio Peregrinus, this plant has been an instant hit in the succulent community, particularly in Japan, and it’s not very hard to see why.

The beautifully curved leaves that protrude from the stemmed vine look like they’re jumping dolphins kitted out, even, with what looks like dorsal fins. This is definitely the closest to a botanical dolphin you’ll ever get.

This unique formation is thanks to the cross-pollination of two plant variants, the Senecio Roweleyanus (string of pearls) and Senecio Articulates (hot dog or candle plant).

The dolphin succulent can grow up to 6 inches (15 cm) tall and unlike the bunny succulent, maintains its shape as it grows. Also, the longer the vine gets, it will supply you with more leaves until you have an entire ocean of jumping dolphins!

You can even expect small star like white and pink flowers during flowering season (typically in warmer months).

Where to Buy Dolphin Succulents

Last update on 2021-01-19 / Amazon

Because the dolphin succulent is a cross variety, it’s not a very common plant and can be difficult to find. A quick internet search shows that there are however specialty growers and you can get lucky on Amazon or Etsy.

Often, you will find that it is the dolphin succulent seeds for sale and not the mature plant that you will be buying. However, a good thing to keep in mind is that collectors often have rare varieties so if you stumble upon someone with a dolphin succulent, make sure to ask for a cutting.

You can use our guide on how to propagate succulents for your new dolphin succulent too!

How to Grow Dolphin Succulents

If you’re growing succulents from seed, dolphin succulents are generally easy to cultivate, just don’t forget to first soak them in warm water and then cold water in order for them to germinate. After that you can plant the seeds into a container with soil.

We highly recommend this soil mix by Bonsai Jack. It is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, it helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. Go ahead and get the 7 Gallon Bag if you are plant nerd like us :). Pick up some of our favorite soil by clicking here: Bonsai Jack Succulent Soil.

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Last update on 2021-01-19 / Amazon

Cover the container with plastic (with a few holes in it for aeration) or a similar wrapping, mist your seeds quite often in order to keep the soil slightly moist. Then wait for your seedlings to sprout. Once your seedlings are established you can move them out of the plastic covered container.

If you don’t have the patience to wait for your dolphin succulent to grow from seed and you’re lucky enough to get a cutting, you can either lie your cutting sideways on the soil so it can root along these points, or you can, after a day or two (once the cut has had time to heal and has become calloused), place it in soil.

The plant will shoot out roots wherever it touches the soil. Take note that you can only propagate dolphin succulents from cuttings and not from their leaves. The leaves are likely to root, but no new leaves or stems will grow. See the differences in propagation methods with our guide here.

The dolphin succulent requires relatively low maintenance and should be an easy plant for beginners to master. Light is one of the most important growth factors and the dolphin succulent, like most succulents, requires plenty of light, but unlike most succulents prefers indirect light. So that being said, these plants make for the perfect house plant, you can perch them on a windowsill or table that gets plenty of sunlight.

Here’s 7 other beginner succulents you can grow right at home too!

When it comes to the preferred soil characteristic, dolphin succulents prefer soil that is loose with a high mineral consistency and that allows for porous movement of water. This will allow them to have a healthy root system to absorb all the nutrients necessary in order to grow beautifully.

How to Water Dolphin Succulents

If you’re looking at planters make sure they follow these requirements with easy drainage and great ventilation that won’t result water logged soil or rotting roots. Take a look at the 12 minimal planters we sourced for you.

This also means that dolphin succulents shouldn’t be watered too often. When watering, bear in mind that like most succulents, dolphin succulents are tolerant of periods of drought. So, the recommended watering allocation should be once per week during the warmer growing seasons and once a month in the colder dormant seasons. Leave the soil to dry out between watering, but be aware that if not watered enough the dolphin succulent’s leaves will begin to pucker.

If you have trouble figuring out when you should water your succulents, we’ve got you covered. This is an in depth guide in when you should water your succulents so that they grow healthily and vibrant.

Senecio Peregrinus @yymplantlover

Surprisingly, the dolphin succulent prefers cooler temperatures. Optimum temperatures in winter, when the plant experiences its dormant season, should be around 72 F (22C). In the summer, temperatures should be maintained between 50-55 F (10-13C).

Crowded conditions make the dolphin succulent happy and it will thrive jam packed in a smaller container like these ones. See how you can repot your dolphin succulents here if it’s too crowded.

If you prefer to have it displayed on its own, you’ll be rewarded with an elegant display of dolphins emerging from the waves. Or if you’d prefer to plant them alongside other plants, paired with octopus agaves, an anemone resembling Sempervivum Tectorum or a kelp like Senecio Madraliscae, you can create an entire ocean scape of colors and textures. 

We are lucky to live in an era where cute succulents are a hit and cultivators are hard at work experimenting to bring out new succulent species. The dolphin succulent is a great testament to that. Not only are they easy look after, but they’ll liven up any succulent garden. They might be tricky to find, however, if you find one they’ll make a great new addition to your collection.

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Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complementary guide. 

Ready to allow your Dolphin Succulents to swim now? Be sure to share this article with your close succulent friends and let them know that there’s succulents that are shaped like dolphins! Thanks for giving this a read!

Sedum Morganianum— the Burros Tail Succulent Plant

Sedum Morganianum Burros Tail

You’ll agree with me that in the recent years the popularity of succulents has grown in leaps and bounds. These little chaps are seen in almost everything, from hanging planters like the image below to boutonnieres. The succulent fandom is not only sweeping the internet, but also botanical gardens, home décor stores, and plant nurseries.

They’re not only idiosyncratic, cute little plants trending in gardens, but also being used as wedding and home décor nuggets.

The wide plethora of these unique plants leaves a succulent newbie literally spoilt for choice. From the “living pebbles” to the stoic saguaro cacti, succulents are one of the most diverse plant groups.

What if I introduced you to the world of the most sought-after and versatile succulents of our age? Ladies and gentlemen, help me welcome: Mr. Burro’s tail.

Hanging succulent planters
Hanging Succulent Planters @sassandbelle

Sedum Morganianum

The burro’s tail is a descendant of the genus Sedum, hailing from the Crassulaceae family. The scientists saw it fit to name it Sedum morganianum. It’s popularly known as the burro’s tail, horse’s tail, lamb’s tail or donkey’s tail. Burro’s tail was thus named because of its pendulous stems and overlapping leaves that resemble an animal’s tail.

This perennial succulent is native to southern Mexico and Honduras. Sedum morganianum has been cultivated since 1935, however, it’s true origin was discovered in 2008 by Mexican botanists in Tenampa, Veracruz. Best used as an indoor hanging plant, burro’s tail is extensively grown as a house plant in Northern America.

Sedum morganianum is an award-winning, ever-green, easy-to-grow succulent with trailing stems arising from the base that may grow up to 3 feet long or more. The burro’s tail scooped the Royal Horticultural Society’s award of Garden Merit in 1993 – even before it’s native origin was discovered!

This attractive succulent has long trailing stems completely covered by thick, lance-shaped leaves that are blue-green in color. Burro’s tail is best grown in suspended pots or containers so that the stems can freely cascade downwards.

Though rare, sedum morganianum produces small, unscented, star-shaped flowers that are pink, red, or lavender in color during spring and summer.

This succulent, mostly thought to be a cactus, has brittle stems with loosely attached leaves that fall off at the gentlest touch. Due to its delicate nature, it’s advisable to keep it away from disturbances.

Sedum morganianum is sometimes confused with the Myrtle Spurge or the Creeping Spurge which is at times erroneously referred to as Donkey’s Tail plant. Myrtle Spurge is a highly poisonous plant that should be handled very cautiously.

The burro’s tail provides an intriguing texture as a houseplant or captivating green exterior in outdoors and landscapes.

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Sedum morganianum burros tail
Burro’s Tail @succsgalore

What Makes the Burro’s Tail so Popular?

  • It’s trailing stems covered by fleshy, blue-green leaves overhanging a pot displays a one-of-a-kind indoor aesthetic.
  • The succulent is easy to grow with very little care needed.
  • Simple propagation technique.
  • One can grow it as a houseplant or a garden plant.
  • Sedum morganianum can be grown in a small pot as it grows vertically downwards hence little space is needed.
  • It is pet and toddler friendly.
  • It does not need a lot of water to grow.

How to Take Care of Burro’s Tail Succulent

The burro’s tail is an easy-care succulent, suiting the neglectful plant care lover or the novice gardener. Whether grown out on the garden or as an indoor plant, growing a burro’s tail is quite a snap.

The following conditions are ideal for a healthy Sedum morganianum.

Lighting for Burro’s Tail

These succulents love bright sunlight, either directly or partially. A minimum of four hours is recommended. Avoid setting them up in the very hot sun as the leaves bleach out and turn yellowish instead of the original blue-green color.

Insufficient light will cause the stem to have longer internodes thus lack of leaf compaction giving it a skimpy tail.

When you grow it indoors, place it on a sunny window to ensure absorption of maximum light. Outdoor burros should be shielded from the very hot sun during the growing season to protect them from leaf color bleaching and cringing.

Ideal Climate for Burro’s Tails

In a tropical climate, the burro’s tail can stay outdoors throughout the year. Pull them indoors during freezing winter as they can’t stand it.

Sedum morganianum will grow well in room temperatures during the growing season. Ideal winter temperatures should be anywhere between 50 and 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Burros tail sedum morganianum
Sedum Morganianum @houseplantclub

Watering Burro’s Tail Succulent Plant

The burro’s tail is a succulent, which means it stores water mostly in its leaves. These plants use the stored water for its metabolic processes. They can use this water for quite some time. Therefore, the easiest way to kill a succulent would be overwatering it. Pumping a lot of water on succulents makes it more susceptible to root rot.

Use a watering tool like this to have better control of the amount of water you use.

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The best way of ensuring safe watering of the burro’s tail is by using the “soak and dry” method. This is making sure the soil dries out completely in between watering.

Give it a generous, thorough watering once in two weeks and every week while in its growing season. Reduce watering during winter as these plants are inactive and don’t grow a lot.

A sure-fire way of knowing when next to water your sedum morganianum is by investigating the leaves. Once the leaves begin to shriven, then it needs a drink – a thorough one.

Best Soil for Sedum Morganianum

Like most succulents, the burro’s tail thrives on well-drained soil specific to cacti and succulents. You can create your own well-draining soil mixture by augmenting regular soil with equal parts of pumice or perlite.

Never use pure garden soil on succulents. They hate soaked soil and it is the major cause of root rot. Instead, use grainy soil or mixed garden soil because it’s well-draining and never holds water in. Here’s a great grainy and mixed bag of soil from Bonsai Jack that is highly rated.

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To add a little bit of spice to your sedum morganianum, you can add worm castings to the soil. Burro’s tail fertilizer is really not necessary, but you can feed it twice or thrice only during its growing season. A weak solution of cactus fertilizer will get the job done.

Feeding it once a month is enough and during winter, don’t feed at all. Sedum morganianum doesn’t need any fertilizer during winter because it’s inactive. For a more in-depth guide read our article: “Best Soil for Succulents”.

Propagating Burro’s Tails

Propagating the burro’s tail is a very facile exercise. The plant can be propagated from stem or leaf cuttings. Propagating from leaves is the easiest. Simply pluck a few leaves from the burro’s tail stem and place them in moist soil.

After a few days, the propagated leaves will start to sprout. Once the baby burro’s tails are half an inch, you can transplant them in their own individual pots.

The stem propagation is also quite straight forward. Cut your desired stem-length. Remove the leaves a few inches from the bottom. leave the stem-cutting to dry for one week until it calluses.

Slightly moisten the soil and then plant the cutting. While planting, pin down your plant deep in the soil to avoid pulling off once it becomes heavy. The most important nutrient needed to grow sedum morganianum is lots of sunlight, therefore, place the new propagates near a window.

If you don’t have much experience with propagating succulents or plants in general, be sure to check our in-depth guide on how to propagate succulents successfully.

Repotting Burro’s Tail Succulent Plants

Repotting can always be done if the burro’s tail overgrows its pot or when the pot becomes too old to support the plant. Choose a pot with draining holes to keep your plants dry and easily breathing. We recommend using terra-cotta pots like the ones below as they help with water retention.

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Before repotting, ensure the soil is dry. Gently remove the plant from the current pot. Identify the rotted roots and get rid of them together with the old soil. In case of any cuts on the plant, treat with fungicides. Put the plant in a new pot and cover with well-draining soil. Let the plant remain dry for a week. Slowly begin watering it lightly to prevent root rot.

It is not advisable to repot mature plants severally because of the brittle nature of the plant. Too much handling of the burro’s tail results in plant damage and loss of leaves as they’re very delicate.

Read more with our article: “The Art of Repotting Succulents – the Right Way”.

Burro’s Tails Pests & Problems

Pests

The burro’s tail does not get attacked by a wide range of insects. The most common pests associated with burro’s tail is mealy bugs and aphids. You can hose them off with water or spray with a mixture of 1/5 rubbing alcohol to 4/5 water. If that fails to work, go for Neem oil which is an organic pest control alternative that is simple yet effective.

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Root rot

Only caused by two things; overwatering or poor draining soil. Rotting may also graduate to the stem and crown. In case you notice such, collect the healthy leaves and stem tips and get rid of the rest of the plant.

Low light issues

Insufficient light causes the burro’s tail to have longer internodes with scanty leaves attached to the stem. Prune the weak parts and move the plant to well-lit area and ensure it receives four hours of bright sunlight every day.

Dropping leaves

Not really a problem but it’s nice to know that Sedum morganianum is very brittle and just a slight brush will cause the leaves to drop. Hanging the succulent is best done in places where objects or people can’t brush against it.

Poison Concerns

As per the ASPCA, the burro’s tail does not contain any poison and it’s therefore non-toxic to humans and pets alike. Caution should be taken however, not to confuse the plant with the poisonous Creeping Spurge or Myrtle Spurge which is erroneously referred to as the donkey’s tail.

Tips for Burro’s Tails

A healthy and mature Sedum morganianum plant will yield the longest stems, growing up to 4 feet in length. To grow your burro’s tail really long, observe the following best practices.

  • Give your burro’s tail plenty of Bright sunlight. Not “sun heat.”
  • Avoid overwatering your plant. Give a thorough watering once or twice a month.
  • Keep the plant away from places where people may brush against it.
  • Burro’s tail thrives best in room temperature and doesn’t like freeze winter. Therefore, keep it warm.
  • Use well-draining soil, preferably a commercial cactus mix or your own mixture of garden soil combined with pumice or perlite.

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Sedum morganianum succulent burros tail
Burro’s Tail @shaughey04

Where to Buy Burro’s Tails

Sedum morganianum is easily available in plant nurseries and home garden centers. You can also find it online in sites such as Etsy and Amazon. Read our new article about where you can buy succulents for a full in-depth how to.

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There you have it, the Sedum Morganianum succulent plant, also known as the burro’s tail. Be sure to read our other articles if you liked this one. We have more specific articles in the works now, in the meantime, comment your favorite succulent and we’ll write in-depth about it!

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

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