Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?

You go to the store. And get a plant— an air plant that is. Oh, it’s so gorgeous, you can’t take your eyes off it. You get an unusual display and set it up in your living room, and don’t you just love how your guests are blown away by the sight?

“I love your plant!” — your friends and family would say.

Barely two weeks later, you notice strange colored spots, and what used to be a healthy, vivacious Tillandsia is now all droopy and dying. But why?!

Unbowed, you quickly discard it and head to the store for a different species. And guess what? The cycle continues.

I know. It’s sad, frustrating and downright shattering.

Every plant lover has been down this lane before. And yes, at first, you might be tempted to throw in the towel and forget all about air plants. But of course, nobody ever resists the urge to try once more given the attractive and idiosyncratic looks of these alien plants.

While it might not be possible to categorically state the specific cause of death, several pointers may give us a clue. Put on your medical gloves, we’re about to do some in-depth air plants diagnosis!

Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?
dying succulent @katloveskale

Tillandsia Rotting

If you recently lost an air plant, it was probably due to rot. It’s typically the biggest cause of death in Tillandsia plants. Overwatering your plants is the main cause of this destructive condition. Just like succulents, air plants store water in their leaves which may sustain them for as long as two weeks.

Allowing water to accumulate inside the plant will quickly result in rot. The tell-tale sign of a rotting air plant is the presence of black or purple color at the plant’s base., almost like the colors human bruises are! How ironic.

Additionally, setting your Tillandsia plants on a damp display pot or dish makes them susceptible to rot. Air plants absorb water and nutrients via trichomes found on their leaves and not through roots. Display your air plants on dry surfaces.

We did an entire article on how to water air plants. However, just for a quick rundown, water your plants by soaking them for about one hour, then immediately place them upside down for all the water to drain. Ensure the plant is totally dry before returning it to the display surface. Avoid misting unless you live in an area with high temperatures.

Air plant rot is fatal and in most cases, is irreversible damage. However, if you catch it early, you can pluck out the rotten leaves to prevent infection and cut back on watering.

Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?
Example of plant rotting.

Are You Poisoning Your Air Plant?

Toxins embedded on your display surface may be harming your air plants and causing them to die slowly. Rust, copper wire, and some type of pressure treated wood are dangerous to Tillandsia health. Sometimes these materials are made with your planters or terrariums and you won’t even know that they’re not helping the growth of your beautiful plants!

Also, such toxins may also result from fertilizers. Using fertilizers containing iron, copper, zinc and boron is highly lethal to these plants. Only feed them with tillandsia-specific fertilizers.

Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?
An example of a poisoned plant.

Does Your Air Plant Have Access to Enough Light?

It can be tempting to set up these decorative plants in living room corners, even in poorly lit places. While an air plant kept in inadequate light will not die the next day, its form will greatly change over time leading to a lanky and deformed plant. And soon enough it will be a goner, unfortunately.

It’s a plant after all, so it needs sufficient amount of light just like other plants!

Set your air plants where they can receive bright, indirect sunlight for a few hours a day. This can be three or four hours on average. A south or west facing window is your best bet for your plants to receive sufficient light. Remember— moderation is key like anything in life! Too much sun and your Tillandsia or air plants will get sun burns and become parched.

In case your natural lighting can’t get the job done, you can opt for artificial grow lights, they work just as good. Here’s one that we have set up in the office that works quite well for those gloomier days. They are cleverly designed to provide lighting so that plants can keep up with photosynthesis.

Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?
Plants that are drying out quickly.

Lack of Air Circulation

The basic requirements of air plants are water, light and, yes, you guessed it… air! They’re air plants after all. Air plants kept in closed containers lack proper ventilation and this leads to build up of a humid environment— a quick ticket to plant rot.

Everybody agrees that air plants placed in terrariums look super cute. But those pretty and closed terrariums could spell disaster for your plants due to increased humidity. This is due to lack of proper air circulation and may cause an early death on your plants. Plus, the lack of space in these beautiful terrariums aren’t optimal for the growth of your air plants!

Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?
Succulent plant with healthy growth.

Temperature Changes

Air plants can’t stand freezing cold temperatures or frost. They’ll end up being limp and mushy. It’s advised to keep them in environments above 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Of course, this might not be a huge deal when growing them indoors. For outdoor air plants, it’s recommended that they’re whisked inside once temperatures go below 32 degrees.

Be careful with high temperatures as well. Too much heat will lead to parched and dry plants and so you might need to give them a soak more often than normal.

Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?
Air plants with the proper amount of sunlight exposure.

Dehydrated Air Plants

“Air plants can get all the water and nutrients they need from the air,” said the biggest air plants myth.

While it might be true that Tillandsia plants get some water and nutrients from the air, assuming that they can survive on that alone is a big lie. A really big lie!

Tillandsia are native to the tropical rainforests of Mexico and America. In such settings, air plants can get along pretty well as the air is humid and they can get all the water they need for survival. That drastically changes when you domesticate them. The air in a living room or office setting is dry and things like heating and summer only makes it worse. Therefore, tamed air plants can’t survive without water.

Curly, shriveled and droopy leaves are signs of dehydration. You can salvage such plants by giving them an overnight bath.

Watering air plants once a week will prevent your plants from being dehydrated. Nevertheless, this largely depends with your environment. Air plants growing in arid areas require regular watering.

Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?
Air plants with driftwood.

Pests on Your Air Plants

Pests can cripple up your plants’ growth and ultimately lead to death. Mealy bugs are the most notorious of all. They form a white cotton-like substance and use it to hide while feeding on the plant’s sap.

Quite cheeky creatures if you ask us!

You can knock off these bad boys by using 70% isopropyl alcohol. Try this 99% isopropyl alcohol. Dip a cotton swab in the alcohol and carefully wipe out every infestation on your air plant.

Why Do My Air Plants Keep Dying?
Vibrant air plants.

If you think your air plants keep dying way too fast, the common problems you just read may be part of the problem but not the only. Comment below other problems you think other people might have with their air plants dying. Or for answers and tips from fellow succulent and air plant lovers, join our exclusive Facebook Group, Succulent City Plant Lounge! Our community will gladly help.

Ah we almost forgot, this post is sponsored by Amazon Audible! They are offering all of our Succulent City community an exclusive offer of 2 FREE Ebooks when signing up for a free trial! You can sign up for a free trial here! Think about it, plant some of your favorite succulents or air plants while listening to your favorite Harry Potter book or something else you might be interested in! (Anyone else fans of Harry Potter anyways?)

If you’re still here for some more insight on the wonderful world of air plants, here are some additional articles to check out— How to Grow Air Plants, 5 Types of Air Plants, or Everything You Need to Know About Air Plants.

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Happy AIR planting friends! 💚

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off?

It’s easy to tell when your succulent is in distress. When it starts doing things like dropping leaves left and right, you know it’s not healthy or happy. But figuring out why your succulent baby is in trouble is really hard!

There are so many factors that affect plant health. Water, sunlight, temperature, the soil you use, and even the pot you’ve put your plant in can affect its health. With so many variables, how are you supposed to figure out why your succulent’s leaves are dropping like flies?

That’s what we’re here to help you with today! Unfortunately, we can’t come to your house and diagnose your plant in person, but we can give you the info you need to figure out what’s wrong on your own. By the end of this post, you’ll be an expert plant doctor!

Before we get to the root of the problems in this article, Amazon is offering our Succulent City community an exclusive offer of a FREE 30-day trial of their famous Amazon Prime Membership. Click here to get your free trial started and enjoy that free 2-day shipping! What’s better than having new succulents on your door step extremely fast?

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Why are my succulents leaves falling off? @mijardin.pe

Low Light Succulents

Succulents can start to drop their leaves if they’re kept in low light conditions for too long. You’ll know that your plant has this issue if it looks tall and stretched out. Sun-starved succulents will also start growing towards a light source. So if your plant seems to be growing sideways to get closer to a window, that’s another sign that lack of light is the problem.

Luckily, this issue is really easy to fix! All you have to do is put your plant someplace sunnier, or put it under a grow light like this one— and for additional grow lights we recommend, check out our article, here! But before you put it outside and expose it to the sun’s blistering rays, make sure that you acclimate it first!

Plants get sun spots / burn too!

Acclimate Your Plant for the Outdoors

To start, you should only give your plant about an hour of sunlight or artificial light each day. Anything more and you’ll risk sunburning it. You can slowly increase the length of sun exposure over a period of a few weeks until your succulent is getting around six hours of bright sunlight each day, or around 12 hours of artificial light.

Your succulent should stop dropping leaves after soaking up some much-needed sun. But unfortunately, you can’t reverse some of the damage that’s been done, like your succulent’s stretched out appearance. You can propagate your original plant and grow brand new plants from it that won’t look stretched out. But giving your original plant more sun won’t make it look as compact as it was on the day you bought it. Bummer, right?

Check out our full article about the importance of sunlight for succulents!

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Low Light Succulents @howorthia

Overwatering Your Succulents

Overwatering can have some serious consequences for your plant! It can cause root rot, make your succulent’s leaves fall off, and can even cause total plant death. Yikes!

Overwatering is one of the easiest ways to kill your succulent, so it’s something you definitely want to avoid. If you notice that your succulent leaves are mushy, soggy, and falling off on the regular, you need to cool it with the watering can!

You should only water your succulent when the soil it’s planted in is completely dry to the touch. You’ll probably end up watering your succulents once every week or two.

If you tweak your watering schedule, your succulent leaves should make a full recovery in no time!

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Overwatering your succulents @momsgarden_la

Will too Much Fertilizer Hurt My Succulents?

If you put too much fertilizer on your succulent, it could actually have the opposite effect and stunt its growth! It can also cause some of its leaves to drop off, discolor the remaining leaves, and burn its root system.

If your houseplant is showing some or all these signs, it’s time to take action! If you see any white crust on the surface of the soil, grab your succulent tools and make sure you remove it all carefully. This is excess salt from the fertilizer—it can damage your plant and burn it if you leave it on there.

How to Remove Excess Fertilizer

Now, if you’re going to try to flush the excess fertilizer out of the soil by watering your succulent. Let the water drain completely, and then repeat the process once or twice to make sure there aren’t any traces of fertilizer left.

Then, make sure you remove any leaves that are damaged or dying. This will prevent your plant from using up its precious resources to try to repair damaged leaves. Your succulent will grow new leaves to replace them, so don’t worry about removing them!

If you follow these steps, we think your succulent leaves will make it! But remember in the future to only fertilize your succulents with water soluble fertilizer, like this one we use from Miracle-Gro, that’s been diluted to half-strength. You should only ever use diluted fertilizer on your plant babies to avoid chemical burns. You should also fertilize them sparingly—no more than once a month during their active growing season. That way they won’t get overloaded with salt or nutrients and start losing their leaves.

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off
Can too much fertilizer hurt my succulents @olorfulife.photography

Can Succulents Survive Extreme Temperatures?

If your succulent gets too hot, its leaves will actually start dropping off. It’s a normal response to the stress caused by heat and drought. Isn’t that weird? It seems strange, but it won’t actually hurt your plant and it’s not something to worry over too much.

Still, you should try to throw some shade cloth or a plant cover over your succulent or move it to a less sunny area of your garden to try to prevent this from happening. After all, who likes to see their succulent baby stressed?

If your plants gets too cold, though, that can spell disaster. A lot of succulents can’t handle freezing temperatures, and if they’re exposed to them for too long, the cells inside their leaf tissue can freeze and burst, causing irreparable damage.

If your succulent has frozen in the cold, some of its leaves will look brown or black and kind of mushy. If the damage is really bad, the whole plant will look like it’s rotting. In that case, it’s pretty much unsalvageable. For a proper guide on how to care for succulents in the winter, dormant months, check out this article.

But if the damage has only affected a few leaves here or there, your succulent leaves will be ok. Leave the damaged leaves on your plant. When your plant grows, those leaves will fall right off on their own and be replaced by healthy ones.

For cacti-specific tips, click here to see our guide on determining if your cactus is dying.

Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off?
Beautiful spiral succulents! @akadamatsuchi

Those are some of the potential causes of leaf-loss and how to treat them! Did this post help you figure out what’s going on with your succulent leaves? Let us know in the comments section below!

Learn about some further ways to ensure your succulents and cacti are as healthy as can be! Check out What to Do When My Succulent Leaves are Splitting, How to Get Rid of Mealybugs, or Repotting Succulents the Right Way.

Thanks for reading! We appreciate all of our dedicated Succulent City reader. Don’t forget, we’re on Pinterest and Instagram! Give us a follow for daily succulent content and inspiration.

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth or even The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent today!

Happy planting! 💚💚

How to Tell If Your Cactus is Dying

It’s been some time since you got that cactus. You’re doing all you can to make sure it thrives. Watering. Fertilizing. Sunlight exposure.

You name ’em!

But you haven’t seen a slightest change in quite some time. Is the little thingy really growing? How do you know you’re doing the right thing as far cacti care is concerned?

Worse still, is your cactus dying?

Maybe yes. Maybe no.

One thing with cactuses is that they take time (years) to show any considerable change in size – most of them. Even then, you have to be on the lookout for any signs of deviation from normal growth patterns.

This is how you tell your cactus is dying.

Signs That Your Cactus is Dying

Discoloring cactus

A cactus plant will take on a tinge that is not naturally its own. Depending on where the problem is coming from, the change in color may start at the top end of stem segments or from the base the soil. Dying is guaranteed if rapid action is not taken.

Droopy leaves on cacti

Dying in the few leaf-bearing cacti (like epiphylum) is signaled by downward pointing leaves that lack vigor.

This gives the cactus plant a general unhealthy look (because it is, right?). It will also appear under watered even when you’ve excelled in quenching it.

Soft segments around your cactus

The change of colour above may be accompanied by squishy stem segments that appear swollen.

This also means they can break off easily with minimal force applied.

Try pulling a spine off. That’s a dying cactus if you manage to pull off the specialized leaves.

Instability in your cactus potting soil

You’ll know this if the plant has a lean. Not bent – just the whole plant leaning to a particular side. A dying cactus is shaky in its potting mix and may appear as though it’s about to fall off – well, it will definitely fall off if you moved it, for a severe case. A sign of lack of roots. Or the existing ones may be too weak to properly support the plant.

This is assuming you potted the plant just right.

Foul smells coming from your cactus plant

Now, that’s a really bad sign. A foul smell means a large part of the cactus is completely rotten and there is nothing you can do to save it.

In other words, it is no longer in the dying process, it’s actually deceased now. All you can really do now is dispose of your fighting cactus plant and obtain a new one whether it be from a purchase or from a friend.

Why is Your Cactus Dying?

Overwatering

The age-old sure way to kill a cactus is by treating it to frequent watering sprees. It may look like a sensible thing to do. Only that with a cactus, the more frequent it is getting water, the higher the chances of it dying.

This is so because the water is such a perfect condition for rot.

Inappropriate potting medium

If you didn’t get the memo – your regular potting soil is a no-go zone for a cactus. It just holds on to water for way longer than your plant would prefer.

So, even if you get the watering correct, the soil mix will pull you back a couple of steps. The long periods of dampness are a nice condition for rot. And before you know it, your plant is exhibiting signs of dying.

A wound becoming infected

It may have happened that a part of the stem broke off leaving an open patch.

Such a part is just what bacteria and some pests need to wreck havoc on your cactus. It is soft therefore making it an easy target for insects with munching tendencies. Bacterial infection may come about mainly in the cold weather or when the plant is not exposed to enough sunlight for the injured part to callous over time.

Such wounds cause the plant to start dying from top.

Wrong pot size

Getting the wrong size of a pot for your cactus is a sure way of kicking off its dying process. It could be too small or too large.

Small or large in this case will depend on the size of your cactus.

A pot that is smaller than your plant will choke up its roots as there is little breathing space. A larger than life pot on the other hand is bound to keep so much water sparking off rotting in both the roots and stem. Talk about a double tragedy… you’ll have to find the right balance that’s best for your specific cactus.

How to Save a Dying Cactus

Whether or not your plant can be saved, depends on the extent of rot. For instance, as you’ve seen above, a foul smell emanating from your cactus is a sign that you’ve lost that plant.

But in cases where dying is just getting started, it’s possible to salvage the plant or part of it for propagation purposes.

If the rot is starting off at the top of the stem, cut away small pieces of it (the stem) as you move down to the base of the plant. You want to make sure the any rotten material is done away with for good. Only stop when you reach healthy tissue.

If the plant is taking a beating from the roots up, you’ll have to take the propagation route. Just as above, cut up the plant until you have only healthy tissue before you stop. Let the cut part dry and set it up in a well-draining mix.

Also, make sure to check other aspects like the potting medium, the size of the pot and your watering. Make the following changes if you haven’t already:

  • Repot the plant remnant in a pot that fits it exactly, leaving just enough space for the soil mix. Also, remember to use a commercial cactus and succulent mix or create one by mixing regular potting soil with coarse sand and pumice.
  • Water only when the top part of the mix is dry.

Additionally, if pests and diseases were a part of the problem, apply the appropriate chemicals so as the remaining part of the plant is free from these past ghosts.

Now you’re in the know about dying cactus plants. The signs, reasons, handling and preventing. Time to check around your cacti collection and do the necessary.


Have you learned how to tell if your cactus is dying or not? Let us know what we missed out and we’ll be sure to include it in the article, we want to help as many cactus lovers as we can.

REMINDER: We have an ~exclusive~ Facebook succulent group where you can join in on fellow succulent- lovers’ conversations and post your own experiences & photos! Check it out now!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Thanks for reading and happy cacti planting! (:

Why Your Succulents Are Dying

Whether you’re a newcomer to the succulent world just looking for a pop of color or a long-time cactus convert, succulents and cacti can often be NOT quite the low-maintenance dream they’re cracked up to be. From root rot to mealybugs, the culprits can be varied and often times confusing. But with these quick tips to help you identify and remedy whatever issue arises, you and your succulents will be happy and healthy again in no time! (That Crassula Ovata or Jade Plant will grow like no other).

Watering Your Succulents

Overwatering Succulents

Succulents are frequently native to hot, dry climates, and therefore have evolved to take advantage of every drop of water they can. (Talk about thirsty plants).

This means that when they get too much water they are at risk of developing root rot, a condition stemming from roots sitting in standing water or high-retention soil. An overwatered succulent will start to wrinkle like a finger after too long in the bath or become spongy and yellowed.

Luckily, if caught in time it is easy to fix — all it takes is not watering your plant for several days until the soil dries out completely. In order to prevent overwatering, however, you should be sure to water your succulents only about once a week and plant them in pots with plenty of drainage and soil that doesn’t retain water for very long. Check out our article about when you should water your succulents, it’s helped more than 3000 people.

Cactus and succulent friendly soil is readily available at hardware stores, nurseries, and even some grocery stores, and can also be made at home. But here are some I found on Amazon for those that like things delivered. (Including me).

Under Watering Succulents

While over saturation is by far the more common issue, it is also possible to water your succulents too little. This can occur both if your succulents are watered too infrequently, or if they are in too tall a pot. We recommend a short and stubby succulent pot. Check this 6″ Ceramic Pot out, this will give you an idea for what to keep a look out for when purchasing planters for your succulents!

Succulent and cactus roots are very shallow, so tall pots with what would generally be considered healthy drainage can draw water away from roots before they have a chance to soak it up. Under watered plants are generally relatively easy to identify, as cactuses tend to shrivel up and pucker while succulent’s upper leaves will begin to dry out and get crunchy.

The solution here is pretty clear: simply water your plant more, aiming for a good soak about once a week. It is often easiest to pick a day to be the succulent watering day, thereby making it a routine that is easy to remember and work into your lifestyle. (Plus, your succulents will look forward to this day).

Watering Succulents from Above

While this is less of an issue for cactuses, succulents often have lots of nooks and crannies near the base of the plant that will catch and retain water if watered from above. This can begin to decay the base and stem of the plant and can be challenging to notice until it is too late and the core of the plant is rotten.

If you notice leaves starting to rot from the base up it is best to pluck those leaves and attempt to remove any standing water or rotten foliage.

However, the best way to avoid this issue is to water your succulents at the base rather than with a spray bottle and avoid letting water land on the tops of the leaves.

Mineral Build Up

Tap water can be full of all manner of minerals from calcium to fluoride to chlorine. While these are all beneficial for their human uses, depending on the levels in your local tap water they can be downright harmful to plants.

If you begin to notice a white crusty build up on your leaves or the soil around your plant, you may want to consider either switching to watering with distilled or filtered water, which can sometimes be a hassle, or simply letting your water sit for a day or so before use to let any sediments or minerals filter to the bottom of the container.

This practice, while not always necessary, can limit the amount of contact these minerals have with your plants.

Diseases & Parasites in Your Succulent Plants

Mealy Bugs

Mealybugs are similar to the aphids that appear in outdoor gardens in that they usually show up in large numbers and leave what looks like little bits of dirt on the leaves of your succulent. Unlike aphids, however, mealybugs are generally a whitish grey and can appear on indoor plants.

They spread quickly, so how can you get rid of mealy bugs from your succulents?

The first step in quelling an infestation is always to quarantine any infested plants. As long as that step is taken first, the follow-up treatment is relatively easy. Simply mix up a solution of three parts isopropyl alcohol to one part water and spray your succulents daily until the mealybugs clear up, usually only a couple days.

While this may sound dangerous, this solution will not burn your plants and as the alcohol evaporates quickly, you shouldn’t run into any issues with root rot. More often than not mealybugs are attracted to plants that have been overwatered or over fertilized, so they are also a good sign to reassess how you’re caring for your succulent.

Having a mealy bug problem? Check out our guide on How to Get Rid of Mealy Bugs

Scale Insects

Scale bugs or insects are small shelled bugs of a dark brown color that attach themselves to stems or leaves and suck the moisture from your plants. While it is best to treat them in their larval stage, they are often hard to locate and are readily treatable in adulthood too.

Unlike mealybugs, scale insects can simply be picked off by hand if you have some time. They can also be treated with the same three to one isopropyl alcohol to water solution as the mealybugs, although they may take more time to respond to the treatment due to their protective shells. (It’s like armor to them).

If you find that the alcohol solution is simply not working you can also use neem oil, which is usually available at your local hardware store. Neem oil can be very concentrated, so be sure to follow the directions on the container to avoid burning your succulents as well as the scale bug. (We definitely don’t want to hurt our baby succulents).

Luckily scale bugs are not a time-sensitive pest as long as you begin to treat them before your succulent plant starts to shrivel, so attempting several treatment methods won’t harm your beautiful succulents.

Other Succulent Pests

There are a variety of other, less common insects, fungi, and diseases that can make your succulent home, but more often than not the three to one isopropyl alcohol to water solution will kill an insect infestation and neem oil will target insects, mites, and fungi.

If you are unsure what category your infestation falls under, begin with the alcohol solution, as it can’t damage your plant. If that doesn’t work, move on to a neem oil solution while being mindful with the directions on your particular container to avoid burning your succulent.

Always begin by isolating the affected plant to avoid the issue spreading. If neither of those solutions work, consider bringing the plant into your local nursery. Like a trip to the doctors! They may be able to identify the issue more specifically and suggest another viable solution.

Succulent Home

Succulent Planter

A thriving cactus or succulent will eventually outgrow its pot, either above or below the soil. Why is that? Because they are adapted to dry environments, succulents and cacti roots are shallow and tend to grow horizontally, so they can quickly outgrow a pot that is too small or narrow.

If you notice that your succulent isn’t growing anymore, or is beginning to die, it might be time to consider repotting. Rehoming your plant into a slightly larger, and specifically wider, pot can do wonders for growth and the overall health of your plant. Here’s an article we just wrote about the tips and tricks in repotting succulents, it’s quick and easy!

Succulent Climate & Temperature Tolerance

Succulents can be sensitive to extreme cold, so keeping them in above freezing temps is an important part of keeping your plant happy. A succulent that has gotten too cold can look burned, with parts of the upper leaves beginning to brown, droop, or shrivel up.

If you like to sleep with your windows open in the winter and you live in a colder environment, perhaps consider keeping your succulents in a different room when the weather begins to drop below freezing at night.

Succulent Lighting

Succulents thrive in bright sunlight, so housing them in places that don’t receive much natural light can cause stretching as they seek the light they need.

A stretching succulent will get much taller, with leaves spread widely up and down the stem to maximize the amount of light each leaf receives. If you begin to notice stretching simply move your plant to a location with more light, as once stretching has occurred it’s impossible for the plant to return to its original height.

Here’s a highly reviewed indoor grow light on Amazon we’ve found that is perfect for your indoor succulents.

When your succulent is in bright sunlight, it is also important to avoid leaving water droplets sitting on its leaves after watering, as the water can focus the light and it risks burning your leaves. This is another reason to be sure to water your plants from below the leaves. Learn how to properly propagate succulents for the most effective position for light.


Hopefully, these tips can help you identify and resolve any issues that arise during your succulent care endeavors and keep your plants healthy for years to come.

It is also important to remember that it is completely natural and healthy for some leaves to die at the plant grows. So leaves at the base of your plant drying up and falling off is NOT in any way a poor reflection of your care for your succulent family.

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on Succulent Drainage Requirements or even The Most Common Issues Amongst Succulent Growers today!

If you’re new in the succulent world, here are some beginner succulents that are quite easy to take care of when you first begin. Happy growing!

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