7 Succulent Care Tips

7 Succulent Care Tips

Succulents may not be a real scientific plant family, but they do have a lot of the same characteristics. Succulents are all drought tolerant. They have shallow roots that soak up as much water as possible and swollen leaves that store it for a not-so-rainy day.

Because succulents have these shared traits, you can care for each species in roughly the same way. Succulents require a lot less water than other plants and need lots of sunlight. They all need soil with good drainage, too, and a few other things that we’re going to talk about today.

Here’s our list of seven general succulent care tips that will keep your plant looking nice and healthy!

Keep the soil dry

Succulents, especially cacti, are super sensitive to water. Succulents are resilient little plants that can survive almost anything, but not overwatering. Their roots will rot and they’ll start to attract pests like mealybugs. You’ll have no choice but to toss your beloved succulent in the trash. Unfortunately, we’ve been there.

If you don’t want to make the same mistakes that we did, then make sure you let your succulent’s soil dry out completely in between waterings.

 

Sloth succulent planter
@botanicalsmh

Use the right soil

Using the right soil can also stop your succulent from rotting. The best soil for succulents will have sand and gritty stones in it like perlite and pumice to promote drainage. Perlite and pumice are porous, which allows water to pass through them easily and helps water drain out of the pot faster.

Commercial succulent and cactus soils have these kinds of ingredients, so they’ll do the trick. But you can also create your own custom soil blend using a few simple ingredients. We like to use three parts of regular potting soil, two parts of a gritty sand like builder’s sand, and one part of either perlite or pumice in our mix. If you want to go the pre-made route (I don’t blame you), our choice is down below!

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Still unsure of what soil to use that’s best for your succulent? Be sure to read our in depth guide for succulent soil, at the end of this article!Tit’s helped hundreds of people so far.

Give your plant some air

Something that’s important for succulent health but isn’t often talked about is airflow. Succulents need to have a little room to breathe (I know I do sometimes), so you shouldn’t place them too close together in arrangements if you can help it.

Tight arrangements look great, but may have drainage issues. In order for the soil to dry out properly, enough air has to get to the soil and the roots, and tightly packed arrangements prevent that. If you space them out a little, your plants will have much healthier roots and more room to grow.

Space is good!

Give your succulent plenty of sun

Good ol’ sun rays!

Most succulents come from sunny, warm environments like the desert and the tropics, so they need lots of sunlight to stay healthy. Even succulents like the Snake Plant that can thrive in low light conditions love to get several hours of bright, indirect sunlight every day.

Try to give your succulents between six and eight hours of bright sunlight each day. Your plants will appear more vibrant and healthy if you keep them near one of the sunniest windows in your home, like a south or west facing window.

Giving your succulent babies plenty of sun will also prevent them from getting etiolated. Etiolation happens when a succulent isn’t getting enough sunlight and starts stretching towards the nearest light source, often growing sideways. Etiolated succulents also grow tall very quickly and end up looking quite “stretched out.” It’s definitely something you want to prevent from happening, so put your succulents someplace where they can soak up the sun!

Succulents on top of wooden benches
@lachicabotanica

Don’t let your succulent get too cold

Some succulents, such as Hens and Chicks and Sedums, can survive in freezing temps. But most succulents will actually get brown, mushy leaves if you leave them out in the cold. This is because the water they store in their leaves starts to freeze, which destroys their tissues. Once it happens, this damage is irreversible, so you want to make sure that you bring your outdoor succulent inside when it gets too chilly.

Every succulent has a different range of temperatures it can tolerate, so make sure you do a little research to find out when it’s time to bring your particular succulent inside for the winter.

Use fertilizer

Succulents are known for being slow growers, but fertilizer helps them pick up the pace. It also encourages flowering succulent plants to bloom, so if you want to see your baby flower, pick up some fertilizer.

For most succulents, we recommend using a low balanced, water soluble fertilizer. Balanced fertilizers contain equal amounts of the three main nutrients that your plant needs—nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. You’ll know a fertilizer is balanced if it has three identical numbers on the package, like 8-8-8 or 10-10-10.

“Low balanced” just means that the fertilizer isn’t very concentrated. Succulents need a lot less fertilizer than other plants, and can get burned if you use a fertilizer that’s too strong. That’s why we recommend low balanced fertilizers like 8-8-8 and 10-10-10 blends. Stay away from concentrated fertilizers with high numbers on their packaging, like 20-20-20 blends.

Even though you’re using a low balanced fertilizer, you should still dilute it to half strength to make sure that your plant won’t burn. If you’re using a water soluble fertilizer, you can do this by dissolving half as much fertilizer as the package recommends into the same amount of water. So, if the package tells you to mix one tablespoon of fertilizer into a gallon of water, you should only use half a tablespoon of fertilizer for the whole gallon.

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Some people fertilize their succulents weekly, but we like to fertilize ours less often. Once a month is our sweet spot. The best time to fertilize is when your succulent is actively growing, which is usually in the summer, but can vary from species to species.

 

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Figure out the species of your succulent

That brings us to our last point! If you can, figure out which types of succulents you own. Not all succulents grow during the same time of year, so figuring out which species you have will help you administer fertilizer at the right time. Each succulent has slightly different light and water requirements, too. Knowing which succulents you have will help you give better overall care to your plant babies.

You can start off by figuring out if your succulent grows better in the summer or winter here.


Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent or even Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth today!

We hope that this post has helped you learn all about how to take care of succulent plants! If you need more guidance, check out some of our other posts. Happy planting!

How To Take Care Of Succulents In The Winter/Succulent City

How to Care for Succulents in the Winter

Winter brings with it specific needs for your succulents. To ensure they survive, you have to tailor your care to these demands. In order to survive the harsh conditions, you need to learn about your succulent.

It could be as simple as that, tailoring your succulent care to the cold environment.

But then NOT all succulents have the same demands during this season—there are different types of succulents so there will be different types of care routines as well.

So, before having a look at the specific practices you need to adhere to on how to take care of succulents in the winter, knowing the types of succulents you’re nurturing is a good starting point. Let’s get to it!

How to care to succulents in the winter
@micro.mundos.pvz

Types of Succulents

For the purpose of this guide, succulents are of 2 types: hard succulents and soft succulents.

  • Hardy Succulents – refers to a group of succulents tolerant to both frost and very low temperatures. They thrive best outdoors.
  • Soft/ Tender Succulents – these are succulents that can’t bare being in contact with frost and extremely low temperatures.

The temperature aspect here brings on a new twist – for both of these types, the value beyond which they cannot survive varies.

And given that different areas have varied (minimum) temperature readings, you need to be sure your place of residence is ideal for that particular succulent.

How to Determine Your Zone

Determining your area is a straightforward process. By doing this you will ensure that you buy or obtain the right succulents that are capable of thriving in your particular zone’s environment.

Simply head over to  USDA plant hardiness to find out whether you have winter succulents or more summer succulents. Type in your zip code and you’ll find the zone in which your area falls, denoted by Zone “value”, e.g. Zone 5.

To tell if a succulent is ideal, you’re going to compare the value given above and that of the plant. As a general rule, the value of the plant should be lower than that of the area for outdoor growth all-year-round.

Take Phoenix, Arizona as an example. It is rated at Zone 9. That means that all succulents rated Zone 1-9 can comfortably survive outside during winter. Anything above that will have to be taken inside when the season comes knocking.

How to care for winter succulents
@1amor.suculentas

Caring for Your Succulents in the Winter

As you’ve already seen above, the winter-caring regimen will depend on the type of plant; hardy or soft.

How to take care of succulents in the Winter(hardy)

  1. Be sure to nip off dry leaves – dry leaves are part of a normally developing succulent plant. The plant sheds them and simultaneously grows new ones. But in winter, when the conditions are cold and wet, these dead parts take in huge amounts of moisture which can cause rot and disease to the whole plant. So make sure they are gone as soon as they show up.
  2. Shelter from water – you’re definitely going to reduce your watering frequency during winter. But it’s also important that you stop any other water from coming in contact with your hardy succulent. Usually, snow is a good enough cover, but consider moving your plants under a cover in case it is absent. This way, you avert the rot that comes from prolonged exposure to wetness.
  3. Consider transplanting – this is a step you should take several months prior to winter to ensure roots have adapted and the succulent is well-developed. Instead of leaving them in pots, put your plants into the ground as it offers better conditions. In the event that you come up short on time, move your plants to a location with a few hours of sunlight and free from rain or any other source of water.

Caring for Soft Succulents in Winter

  1. Transfer your succulents indoors – one characteristic of tender succulents is that they don’t survive in frost and extremely low temperatures. Leave them outside to battle these two and you won’t have them a few weeks into the season. Bring them inside where temperatures are fair to them and the frost non-existent. They’ll thank you for that.
  2. Reduce the watering frequency – the soil is drying up slowly because of the winter and the fact that your pots are in-house. If you keep up with the same watering routine, you run the risk of losing your plants to rot. For this reason, your watering should be well spread-out for the soil to dry up completely which allows your soft succulents to thrive.
  3. Ensure maximum light exposure – sunshine is going to be a scarce resource during this time. Also, the fact that your plants are indoors, means there is little exposure to the already reduced sunshine. If you can, place your plants near a window – a sunny one at that – and make sure to rotate the pots so that your plants don’t bend or fade due to light coming from only one side. In the absence of an appropriate window, consider investing in a grow light.
  4. Maintain steady airflow – you need to keep the air moving so as to dry up the potting mix fast, which further averts rot and pest infestation. Just open the windows to let the wind in or make use of fans. You can always combine both for enhanced results.
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Caring for succulents in the winter
@cosas_de_crasas

General Care for All Succulents in Winter

Forget about fertilizer (for now)

Most succulents are at a dormant stage during the winter seasons. With that said, refrain from trying to force-feed any nutrients by applying fertilizers (homemade or store-bought). Fertilizers during this time period will lead to soft leaves that are susceptible to rot.

Note: There are a few varieties of succulents that grow during the winter seasons. Therefore, it is best that you keep applying fertilizer for such plants to grow even during this time.

Watch out for pests

Especially bugs that appear like tiny cotton balls on the underside of the leaves of your succulents. It’s safe to assume you know what pests can do to your precious succulents plants right?

First, remember to keep the affected plant away from the rest to curb or control the spread of the pests like mealybugs or scale insects. Afterward, eliminate them by spraying the plant with a mixture of rubbing alcohol and water.

Read how you can safely get rid of mealy bugs or other pests here, we’ve provided an in-depth article for you.

Aim for some light

Winter is a period of time where there is reduced sunlight. With that said, keep in mind that you should try to expose your succulent plants with enough light at least 3 hours per day for continued healthy development.

If you’re living in places where the guaranteed sunlight is less than 3 hours a day, you might want to take a look at getting your succulent a grow light of some sort. This will help you guarantee light for your succulent in order to steadily grow.

 

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In a nutshell, your succulent plants will not fall on the wayside if you’re properly caring for them properly during winter conditions. Follow the simple routines we’ve outlined above and rest assured that your succulent will continue growing even in less than ideal conditions.

Incorporate the above steps and let us know how your succulents grow during the winter, take pictures too! You can share your pictures with us and join the conversation in the Succulent City Plant Lounge.

Be sure to keep an eye on our Succulent City Youtube channel! We are organizing to release some great quality videos to help all succulent parents have plants that thrive. Be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss out on new videos.

Did this article help answer your succulents care questions? We sure hope so! We do have resources with more detailed information. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulents lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth or even The Correct Way to Water Succulents today!

 

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Monocarpic Succulent: What are Monocarpic Succulents?

What are monocarpic succulents

Seeing your flowering succulents bloom is exciting. Succulents produce bright, beautiful blooms in many colors like red, white, yellow, pink and purple. When you start to see flowers stalks shooting up from your succulent, it’s hard not to smile and wait impatiently for it to bloom!

But sometimes, right after that big beautiful display of flowers, succulents turn black and die. If this has ever happened to you, don’t worry—it’s completely normal. Some succulents are monocarpic, which means they die right after they flower.

There are things you can do to delay your plant’s blooms, but eventually, all monocarpic plants flower and die. Today we’re going to teach you all about this natural phenomenon and give you some tips that will keep your plant baby healthy for as long as possible.

Monocarpic succulent plants flowering
@pinkandplants

Definition of Monocarpic

Like we mentioned above, monocarpic plants are ones that die shortly after flowering or producing fruit. In Greek, “mono” means single and “karpos” means fruit, so it makes sense that plants that only flower or fruit once are called monocarpic. Plants that flower again and again over the course of their life cycle are called polycarpic plants, meaning “many fruits” in Greek.

Monocarpic succulents die because flowering takes up all of the energy that they have. These plants divert all of their resources to producing flowers because they contain seeds that will create brand new plants. Just like most living things, a succulent’s goal is to reproduce, so that’s why the plant devotes so much energy to produce flowers and seeds.

After monocarpic succulents sprout flowers, they can’t sustain themselves anymore because they have no nutrients or energy left over. Sadly, the monocarpic starts to turn black and die.

Many monocarpic succulents, like Hens and Chicks, live several years before they flower, while some succulents like the Century Plant take decades to flower. So don’t worry—you’ll get plenty of time with your succulent plant before it dies.

Types of Monocarpic Succulents

Agave, Sempervivum, and Kalanchoe plants are the three main types of monocarpic succulents. All Sempervivums are monocarpic, but not all varieties of Kalanchoe and Agave plants are. You’ll have to look up which species of succulent you have to determine whether or not it’s monocarpic.

(Comment below if you’d like Succulent City to make a database of monocarpic succulents for you).

Some Aeoniums and varieties of Yucca, like the Joshua Tree, are considered to be monocarpic as well even though they don’t die right after flowering.

I know what you’re thinking… aren’t all monocarpic plants supposed to die right after flowering? How can you call a plant monocarpic if it doesn’t die?!

Well, these plants do die, in a sense. Individual branches on these plants flower one at a time and then die, but it doesn’t kill the whole plant. These plants still have many other branches that continue to grow and thrive.

So, some monocarpic succulents don’t die after all. But is there anything you can do to keep the ones that do, like Hens and Chicks, from dying?

Monocarpic succulents sempervivums
@justgrowsucculents

Can I Stop My Monocarpic Succulents from Dying?

The answer is… maybe.

Some gardeners have been able to stop their monocarpic succulents from dying but the success rate is not as probable as succulent lovers might love to have.

If you take good care of your succulents, a lot of them won’t flower as quickly. Succulents may flower early when they’re under stress due to lack of water or sunlight. They do this in the hopes that their seeds will end up somewhere with better growing conditions. So make sure that you give your plant plenty of bright sunlight and enough water.

You can try to cheat nature and keep your succulent alive even longer by cutting the flower stalk down as soon as you see it. This works best with Kalanchoe plants, which have flower stalks that are easy to cut off, but you can also cut the blooms out of Sempervivums. (Here’s a list of gardening tools that can help you accomplish this).

When Sempervivums start to bloom, the leaves in the center of the rosette close up and the rosette tilts upwards. Eventually, the center of the rosette will grow into a tall plant stem that can get to be a few inches to a foot tall. As soon as you see your Hens and Chicks plant begin to tilt upwards, you need to cut out its central leaves if you hope to save it.

Monocarpic succulent plant succulent city
@st3jewellery

Grab a garden knife and use it to separate the tight, tilted leaves in the center of the rosette from the rest of the leaves. Make sure you remove everything and get a nice clean cut. Watch your Hens and Chicks for new growth in the coming weeks. If you see new offsets forming in the center of the rosette, then the procedure was a success!

We’ve never tried this method, but we can’t imagine that it has a high success rate. Your succulent may try to flower again, so one procedure may not be enough to keep it alive. Cutting out so many leaves will also change the way your plant looks. New offsets will form in the center, which can make your plant look a little wonky. We still think this method is worth trying, though. We’d rather have an imperfectly shaped plant than no plant at all!

If you’d rather sit back and let nature take its course, that’s great too! Enjoy the beautiful blooms that your succulent will produce over the coming weeks, and try to harvest the seeds to grow more plants later. If you take care of the offsets that your plant produced during its lifetime, that bare spot in your garden will be filled in no time!

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We hope that this post has shed some light on this rather confusing topic! If you’ve just discovered that your succulent is monocarpic, or figured out the reason why one of your plants randomly died on you a few years ago, let us know in the comments below. Happy planting!

Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complementary guide. 

The Stunning Crassula Capitella Succulent

The Stunning Crassula Capitella Succulent

Would you like to grow your very own natural pagoda?

Yes, that’s right. In the heart of the wonderful world of succulents is an eye-catching perennial with multi-colored bright red and green leaves that appear like a tiered tower of a pagoda. This fiery evergreen makes an attractive garden focal point and creates a gorgeous border around the edge of a sunny rockery. Meet the Crassula Capitella, the small but striking succulent that also goes by the names Red Flames, Red Pagoda and Campfire Plant.

The Stunning Crassula Capitella Succulent
Red and green succulent. @mes_succulentes

Origins of the Crassula Capitella

Crassula Capitella is natively rooted in South Africa, vibrantly thriving in the provinces of Transvaal, Mpumalanga, Free State, Limpopo, KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape. It is also prominently featuring in the landscapes of Namibia and Botswana. The plant is well known to the indigenous people of South Africa as a herb whose roots are dried and crushed into a powder that is used to heal wounds.

This succulent derives the name Crassula from the Latin word “Crassus” which means ‘thick’. This is referring to the size of the chubby leaves. The word Capitella relates to a specific epithet drawn from the Latin word “Capitellum” which translated means ‘small head’.

Be sure to also check out “Where Do Most Succulents Come From?” to see the origin of the rest of your succulent garden.

The Stunning Crassula Capitella Succulent
Succulent in well-draining pot. @myfellowfoliage

Crassula Capitella Succulent

This evergreen succulent has small, pointed, thick leaves that are firmly stacked on top of each other, attached to a stem. The leaves are narrow and tend to resemble a propeller. As the plant grows, the leaves start off as a bright, apple-green color. After that, the more sunlight the plant receives which makes for the leaves to form highlights at the tips and edges that range in shades, from deep purple, to blush red and intense orange.

The different hues are emphasized during the winter as the perennial takes advantage of bright sunlight and cool, long nights. When grown in shaded areas, the leaves of Crassula Capitella remain olive green in color, all year round. The leaves grow in the shape of a rosette, with larger leaves tightly packed at the base of the stem and smaller, spaced out leaves at the top tip of the stem.

Interested in these colorful succulents? Make sure you check out “5 Succulents with Red Flowers” here.

Crassula Capitella is an upstanding member of the plant society, in the sense that it tends to grow standing upright, ranging from 15 to 40 cm tall. Given the right conditions, this succulent can also spread around a 1-meter radius, but the tips of the stems will always try and face the sun.

Once a year, mostly during the summer, the stems sprout clusters of tiny, star-like, white flowers that become the feature attraction for bees and butterflies. This succulent also produces an elongated inflorescence forming from the stem, and the roots appear at the plant’s internodes, making rooting effortless if the stem is lying on the ground.

The Stunning Crassula Capitella Succulent
Crassula capitella with blueish hue. @dr_succs

Best Watering Conditions

No matter how faithful we try to be with our evergreen friends, sometimes things just don’t go as planned, for example, they may end up with no access to water for a short time period. The ever-forgiving Crassula Capitella turns out to be a super succulent! In addition, to storing water in the leaves like other succulents, it also saves water during the day. Thanks to the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM), the succulent is able to open its stomata at night to absorb carbon dioxide, instead of during the day, which helps the plant reduce internal moisture loss due to evaporation. The plant’s hardiness enables them to thrive and survive in drought-prone areas.

That being said, however, the Crassula Capitella still requires a drink of water now and again. Try these water bottles out when its time to water your succulent. Likewise most succulents, one of the greatest dangers to these plants is over-watering. To be on the safe side, you would rather your plant be too dry as compared to too wet. Not sure why your Crassula Capitella is dying? Check out “Why Are My Succulent Leaves Falling Off?”. Anyways, that is to say a good drink of water every fortnight should be sufficient and the timing can alternate depending on the weather. This succulent does not like bath time and would only require a short 10-minute soak in a saucer of water, then shaken off to drain excess water.

The Stunning Crassula Capitella Succulent
stunning decoration @succulentsssss

Best Lighting Conditions

To bring the best out of the leaf coloring, Crassula Capitella will do well with at least 6 hours of sunshine in a partially shaded area. The plant prefers light or porous, well-draining garden soil, like this one. Crassula Capitella can withstand some level of frost, but it does not do well in freezing temperatures. When small, brown dots start to appear on the leaves, this could be a sign of frost damage. If residing in areas with cold climates, place the plant in a container that can easily be relocated indoors during extreme temperature changes.

The Crassula Capitella is susceptible to mealy bugs and fungal diseases. It should be checked on regularly. This succulent can also fall prone to foliage edema which occurs from rapid changes in moisture. The plant is safe to have around curious animals. To clarify it does not fall under the list of toxic succulents.

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The Stunning Crassula Capitella Succulent
Crassula capitella in the garden. @cactinaut

Propagation

This branching succulent propagates through offsets of leaf, root, and stem cuttings. To propagate the plant using a part of the plant, ensure that your cutting is approximately 130 mm long. Try these shears for those tricky cuts. After that, place the cutting in a tray with succulent potting mix or soil that is moist but not waterlogged. It takes about 4 to 6 weeks for the cuttings to take root and show new growth. During this time, it is advisable to occasionally water the plant to establish an extensive root system and after that, you can reduce watering to every fortnight.

Also check out “5 Tips for Propagating Succulents” for a more in-depth look at propagation.

The Stunning Crassula Capitella Succulent
Light green capitella succulent. @adelicadezadoamor

Pruning and Fertilizer

To elongate the life of the Crassula Capitella, firstly it’s suggested that you prune and replant your succulent after it flowers. Secondly, this succulent could do with an organic compost fertilizer, twice a year or if the soil is impoverished. Old foliage can be taken off with a sharp, clean knife before the new leaves start to emerge to maintain the pleasant and delightful look of your succulent. To really keep your Crassula Capitella thriving, every two to three years, especially in the early springtime, you could divide up the clumps and direct the succulent to grow in the direction you would like.

The Stunning Crassula Capitella Succulent
Stair pattern on crassula capitella succulent. @replantnl

Depending on your location and where you buy your plants from, Crassula Capitella range in price from $3.00 to $20.00. With a wide variety of colors available at select supermarkets, online, and at your local farmers market. Their intriguing shapes have become the latest trend for wedding planners and interior designers. They make absolutely brilliant ornamental gifts in an indoor container plant or hanging basket.

Thanks for reading! If you have a minute, drop us a line letting us know where you get your succulents from, and maybe we could compare notes, leaves, and succulents!

Also if you liked this post, make sure to check out related content like “What is a Cactus Plant?” or “5 Office Succulents You Wish You Had at Work”. And Be sure to join our ever-growing succulent community on  Facebook,   Instagram, and Pinterest!

Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complimentary guide.

Happy Planting!! 🌵

Easiest Way to Take Care of Aeonium Arboreum

Care for Aeonium Arboreum

Most succulents thrive on neglect, and the Aeonium arboreum plant is no exception. As long as you don’t completely forget to water it, it’ll probably survive! It’s the perfect plant for people with black thumbs and people who don’t have a lot of time to tend to their plants.

These succulents aren’t just easy to care for—they’re also super beautiful! They have long branching stems and big rosettes in colors like green and maroon. They remind us a lot of Echeveria and Hens and Chicks. If you like those succulents, you’ll love this one for sure!

Even though Aeonium arboreum plants are pretty easy to take care of, there are a few things that can kill them. So stick with us and keep reading to learn all about aeonium care!

how to care for aeonium arboreums
potted aeonium arboreum arrangment @aeonium.nhits

Planting Aeonium

Most Aeoniums are native to the Canary Islands. Because they’ve adapted to a coastal environment, they like a little more moisture than other succulents.

To give our Aeoniums a little more moisture, we like to plant them in a less porous soil blend than the one we plant our other succulents in. We blend a little bit of regular potting soil with our favorite succulent soil to create a soil blend that retains just a little more moisture.

Two parts succulent soil to one part potting soil is what we like to go for. It’ll drain a little slower than regular succulent soil and keep the Aeoniums moist, but not too moist. We don’t want to cause root rot!

Speaking of roots, did you know that Aeoniums have shallow root systems? Aeonium arboreum plants can get to be up to four feet tall, so you’d expect them to have deep roots. But even tall Aeoniums can survive in fairly shallow containers because of their shallow root systems.

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how to care for aeonium arboreums
blooming aeonium arboreum @laboiteamaga

Because Aeoniums don’t need a lot of soil, they make great container plants! They look great in stylish indoor planters like this one and only need to be replanted in bigger containers about once every three years. The best time to repot them is in the fall, during their active growing season.

After we replant our Aeoniums in a bigger container, we give them a few days to acclimate to their new pot before we water them. This gives them a chance to root and helps prevent root rot.

Another thing to keep in mind when you’re planting Aeonium is that their branches are pretty fragile. They have a tendency to snap right off, so you have to be careful when handling your plant!

If a few branches pop off, don’t worry! You can leave them to scab over for a few days and then replant them. They should take root and form brand new plants! We’ll talk about this more later.

how to care for aeonium arboreums
green aeonium arboreum @guardiaplantas

Watering Aeonium Arboreum Plants

Aeoniums do like a little more moisture than other succulents, but you still can’t go crazy with the watering can! You should only water your Aeoniums when the top layer of soil feels pretty dry. You’ll probably end up watering them about once a week.

During the summer months, when they’re dormant, you should cut back on the water. Watering them once a month should be enough during the summer. If your plant is outside and gets some rainwater, it may need even less frequent waterings or no water at all!

You should soak and dry your Aeoniums the same way you do with your other succulents. Before you water them, stick your finger an inch deep into the soil and make sure it’s dry. If it’s still pretty wet, hold off on watering for a little longer.

If the soil feels pretty dry, grab your watering can and soak your Aeoniums until water runs out of the drainage hole of the pot. If your Aeoniums are in the ground, water them until the soil feels wet about an inch down.

One of the few ways to kill your Aeoniums is by overwatering them, so make sure you follow the soak and dry method! Otherwise, they’re pretty chill plants that can withstand a lot!

how to care for aeonium arboreums
droplets on aeonium arboreum @mimgarrett

Fertilizer Requirements

Aeonium arboreum plants grow during the winter and spring, which is the best time to fertilize them. You should fertilize them with a balanced, water soluble fertilizer, diluted to half strength. So if the directions say to dissolve 1 tablespoon of fertilizer into a gallon of water, you’d only use ½ tablespoon. You can fertilize them up to once a month during their growing season.

Remember not to fertilize your Aeonium arboreum plants during the summer months—that’s when they go dormant!

Light and Temperature Requirements

If you keep your Aeonium arboreum plants inside, then you should put them near the brightest window in your home.

Outside, though, these plants prefer partial shade to full sun, especially during the summer months when the sun really beats down on them. They do best with bright but indirect sunlight, so provide them with some light shade to prevent them from burning in the hot sun.

Aeonium arboreum plants generally don’t like cold temperatures. They can survive for short periods of time in 25 degree weather, but they can’t handle long winter freezes without turning into popsicles. So if you live in an area that gets lots of cold weather and snow, bring your Aeonium arboreum plants in for the winter to keep them nice and toasty!

how to care for aeonium arboreums
deep purple @paulhitchcock1958

Can Pests Kill Aeoniums?

Pests and overwatering are kryptonite for Aeoniums! Pests like mealybugs and spider mites are aggressive and can kill your plant if you let the infestation go on long enough.

That’s why it’s important to recognize when an infestation is happening and nip it in the butt quickly! Mealybugs are white and fuzzy, so they’re often mistaken for mold. Spider mites are a little harder to see and identify. The first signs of damage will be brown or yellow spots on the leaves of your plant. As the infestation continues, you might notice webbing on the plant that looks like spider webs.

Both of these types of infestations can stunt your plant’s growth, cause damage to its leaves, and even kill it if it goes on for too long. Yikes!
But there is something you can do to help! You can spray your plant with insecticidal sprays or neem oil. To curb a mealybug infestation, you can also spray your plant with some rubbing alcohol if you put it in a spray bottle. Keep spraying your plant until the bugs are gone. Make sure you move any infected plants away from the rest of your plant collection too so the pests don’t spread!

how to care for aeonium arboreums
potted aeoniums @rechieii_tunyi

Aeonium Propagation

If one of the stems of your Aeonium arboreum plant falls off when you’re repotting it or falls over because it’s too heavy, you can propagate that stem to create a brand new plant instead of discarding it.

You can also take a cutting directly from the plant underneath one of the rosettes. Just grab a sharp garden knife and cut the stem about 5 or so inches beneath one of the rosettes.

Before you plant your cuttings, you’ll have to let the cut ends heal over for a few days. Wait until the cut sides have scabbed over completely before you plant your cuttings in succulent soil.

Once they’re planted, keep them in a location that gets bright, indirect sunlight and water them regularly. Over the next few weeks you’re going to want to keep the soil barely moist at all times. When the plants take root you can put them on the same watering schedule as your mature Aeonium arboreum plants.

how to care for aeonium arboreums
beautiful aeonium arboreum @gea.zini

Now that you know how to take care of Aeonium arboreum plants, are you going to go out and buy a few? The next time we go to the nursery we’re definitely going to grab a couple! Let us know if they’re on your wishlist too in the comments section below!

Better yet, let us know if you have this in our exclusive Succulent Plant Lounge. Every day we have exclusive members giving each other tips and tricks on how to take care of their succulent babies, we know you’d like this too!

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on Essential Tools for Planting the Best Succulents or even The Correct Way to Water Succulents today!

Happy planting! ?

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