Caring for Succulents in the Spring/Don’t Miss the Care Tips

Caring for Succulents in the Spring

What makes succulents plants so interesting during the Spring? This is the season to enjoy all the colors and shapes of many succulents plants, while other plant types try to show-off, succulent plants are the masters at it. (Prove us wrong)!

Blooms will begin to pop-up and with a little help from our great friend, the sun, succulents plants are showcasing their intensity and majestic colors.

Here’s something we could learn from our succulents plants, stress is not always a bad thing. It brings beauty and joy! (At least for succulents plants it does). The reason we’re calling it stress is simple. It is common in the succulents’ world that the exposure to more sunlight, fluctuations in the weather and changes in watering habits encourage great change in our succulents plants.

When they’re exposed to bright and constant light (about 4 – 6 hours per day) all kind of shades starts to appear in the most wonderful way. The light and seasonal changes in climate help bring the best-looking succulents plants to life.

Green succulent plant
@sunshinesucculents.co

Beautiful changes are very prominent succulent plants like the Pachyveria Bluepearl succulent plant. The succulent’s leaves change from silky blue tones to vibrant red tones. Another succulent plant that experiences incredible appearance changes is the Kalanchoe Fedtschenkoi, its pinkish and purple tones are so majestic!

It’s truly amazing what succulents can do when exposed to more light, but keep in mind that the majority of succulents such as many echeverias thrive when they’re planted in pots with some protection from direct light. (Which is why a lot of care guides suggest that succulents get indirect sunlight rather than direct).

During the Spring, be conscious of where the sun hits your succulents. Be sure to still be mindful of how and where your succulent is placed. If the light is too harsh, re-position your succulent so that there are no direct hotspots on the precious succulent. (We don’t want our babies to dry out).

Popular Spring Succulents

Delosperma congestum— “Gold Nugget”

It’s easy to understand why this succulent plant gets the nickname Gold Nugget. Its vibrancy and bright yellow flowers are hard to miss. During the winter months, the leaves of the Delosperma Congestum succulent turns more of a maroon color.

Delosperma Congestum Gold Nugget
@druarmistead

Drosanthemum speciosum— “Rosea”

With purple flowers blooming during the springtime, its nickname Rosea couldn’t be any more fitting. Growing low to the ground and quite durable in poor soil mixes, this succulent can survive what most can’t.

Drosanthemum Speciosum Rosea
@thechigardener

Sedum Adolphi— “Firestorm “

This golden sedum speaks for itself. With the bright oranges and yellows it produces as it grows, it’s definitely quite the eye-catcher. Its nickname is even Firestorm! (Talk about a superhero type of nickname).

Sedum Adolphi Firestorm plant
@coastalcacti

Aloe Maculata— “Soap Aloe”

Are you mesmerized yet? Known as the Soap Aloe, this succulent has quite the structure and shape. The bluish-green tints as you get closer to the center of the succulent plant absolutely beautiful! Don’t you agree?

Aloe Maculata Soap Aloe plant
@aloesucculentsveramuch

Gardenia

This is as pure as it gets, just look at the hue in that white pigment! Delicate and soft, the gardenia plant takes a lot of maintenance in order to stay healthy and growing. Be sure you are prepared to get your hands full when taking care of this beautiful plant.

White gardenia succulent plant
@carolynnmanners

Why Caring for Succulents in Spring can be Different

We are in the growing season for most of the succulents species, many are “waking up”, meaning they grow again and start developing new pups, talk about more succulents! Aloes and Echeverias are just some of the spring loving plants.

According to Anne Lowings, a master gardener in Sonoma County at the University of California, to grow really big and showy succulents, apply small doses of a balanced liquid fertilizer to help them. We highly recommend this liquid fertilizer for succulents & cacti by Cute Farms. It’s super gentle on your plant babies & its a monthly use formula. We highly recommend checking it.

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Also, the weather condition is a big difference, leaving behind the chill breeze, welcoming a loving bright sun and occasional blissful rain, enhance the beauty of each species, wherever they are planted in. 

Grow your Succulents to Success

In order for succulent success, search for the needs of each cultivation in order to apply their specific water needs, especially if you plant them between other non-succulents plants. (You can also check out our article on when you should water your succulents, it has more than 2000 shares)!

Be sure to avoid water hogs by planting them in mounts with great soil draining practices. But, before adding the soil, make room where you can place a good layer of rocks for an even better drainage system, then add the soil. If you are looking for soil recommendations. We use this fast-draining + zero root rot succulent soil by Bonsai Jack in our office & we can’t say enough good things about it!

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Remember, succulents are drought-tolerant plants, they don’t need as much watering as other garden plant types. With this in mind, use the rule of thumb, which is the easiest way to know when they need water. Soil should be at least two inches deep dry before you water them. When leaves pucker or are losing their gloss it is also an indicator that they are not receiving enough water.

When our beauties are growing in the garden, rainfall is a great blessing for them. This provides soil-enriching minerals and washes away any dirt or dust in their leaves, helping them to absorb nutrients and generate oxygen which allows them to keep growing healthy and strong.

 

Hens and chicks succulent plant
@sunshinesucculents.co

Controlling those Pests during Spring

The best thing you can do to help your succulent is to avoid their sitting in water, overwatering our succulents we could cause rot and welcome many pests, like mealybugs. They are tissue sucking insects and hard to see at the beginning. Usually, they lodge deep in the layers of echeverias, sempervivums, and other rosettes shape. (Check out the other ways in why your succulents are dying here).

Besides mealybugs, there are other kinds of pests to keep an eye for, such as snails and aphids. If you notice them, here are some things you can do to get rid of them…

  • Remove snails by hand – Eww gross! It’s okay to be hands-on sometimes. They are nocturnal creatures so wait for the dusk or early morning hours to eliminate the threat while it is active. These creatures leave a slimy trail after them, so that’s an easy way to discover where they are. If you really don’t want to get your hands dirty though, just use a pair of succulent tweezers, make sure they are sterile too! Don’t have a pair of succulent tweezers? This succulent tool kit by Ginsco has them and it’s super affordable. (you can use that scooper for easy soil distribution on your tiny planters too!)
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  • Diatomaceous earth – Also known as D.E. (found in gardening supplier stores), mix in with your soil or add some in the top near the stems of your succulents. This contains about 80%-90% silica, which helps kill insects by dehydrating them, but while capturing unwanted material allows liquid to flow through. Take precautions if you are using this product, diatomaceous earth in large amounts can be a health risk for humans. Avoid skin contact. We recommend reading more about this product before using them. If your local gardening store doesn’t have Diatomaceous Earth Powder, we recommend this one by Harris Co. It’s food-grade safe & includes a free powder duster so you don’t have to worry about skin contract. (win-win for everyone!)
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  • Organic pesticides – Follow the label instructions and protect the succulents from the sun while you treat them with the pesticide.
  • Insecticidal soap – spray it on affected succulents both stems and leaves, keep using every 3 – 7 days (according to the brand instructions) to eliminate bugs. We have a small outdoor succulent garden at our office & we have used this insect soap by Safer Brand in the past. Sometimes they have a sale on their 2 packs, so we always recommend waiting & stocking up because who doesn’t love a good sale!
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That’s it! Not many differences in taking care of succulents in spring as much as you would’ve thought right? It’s fairly simple and similar to how you’d care for succulents from other seasons.

Enjoy the beauty of each succulent species, help them grow healthy and watch how much of a presence they’ll bring to your home this Spring! Also here are 16 more succulent types in case you’re interested.

Also if you are succulent obsessed & are on Facebook, would you mind joining our Facebook Group “Succulent City’s Plant Lounge

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth or even The Correct Way to Water Succulents today!

What is a Zebra Plant— Haworthia Fasciata

What is a Zebra Plant Haworthia Fasciata

If you’re anything like me, you’re tickled pink admiring the awestruck beauty of Zebras in the jungles of Africa.

But you’re also frustrated when you just can’t figure out whether Zebras are white with black stripes or black with white stripes. Well, thanks to the quirkiest plants on the planet, you can have a green version of the Zebra growing in your garden or living room!

These eye-catching succulents add an ambiance of wildlife to living rooms and offices. Their versatile and tenacious qualities ensure that even the most amateur gardener has an easy time growing them.

Quite a conversation starter, the Zebra plant is one succulent you’ll want to grow.

The Zebra Plant— Haworthia Fasciata

Haworthia Fasciata Succulent Plant
@smartplantapp

The Zebra plant is a low growing succulent reaching to a height of between 4-8 inches. This heavily suckering plant forms proliferating rosettes arising from the base. Haworthia fasciata is generally a slow growing succulent that can last a lifetime. This dainty succulent is clump forming and thus it can fit well with other succulents in the same container.

This South African succulent stands out for its erect, multifarious leaves having streaks of white tubercles on the green outer surface which gives it the Zebra effect.

When stressed (mainly due to long hours in the hot sun), the tip of the leaves may turn red. Haworthia fasciata has a miniature leafy stem that appears to be almost invisible.

Due to its slow-growing nature, the Zebra Haworthia rarely blooms especially when planted indoors. When it does, blooms appear in summer characterized by tiny, tubular pink or white flowers on an inflorescence (a thin tall stem).

Scientific Classification

Botanically referred to as Haworthia Fasciata, this fascinating succulent hails from the family Asphodeloideae, and Haworthia as the Genus. The genus Haworthia is named in honor of Adrian Hardy Haworth, who was an entomologist and a botanist. (How cool is it to have a plant named after you!)

With about 80 species under its belt, Haworthia is one genus that offers a wide variety of succulents for one to explore.

Haworthia fasciata is commonly known as the Zebra cactus though it’s not a cactus but a succulent. Other names include the Zebra Haworthia and the Zebra plant. It’s like the Zebra name is given to anything that has white stripes on it and thus, the name Zebra plant can be quite misleading.

Two other plants (that are not succulents) are also referred to as Zebra plants. These include Aphelandra squarrosa and Calathea zebrine. However, nothing can come close to the glamour exuded by our Zebra Haworthia.

Origin of the Zebra Plant

Haworthia Fasciata or the Zebra plant, is native to the Eastern Cape of South Africa. They always get the good ones!

It was introduced to Europe in 1600 by a group of adventurous collectors and is now a popular household beauty around the world.

Related Species

Haworthia attenuata closely resembles the Zebra cactus. In fact, both succulents share the name Zebra plant. The only distinguishing feature between the two is the tubercles on the leaves.

Whereas Haworthia attenuata has both of its leaf surfaces covered by white tubercles, Haworthia fasciata’s leaves have a smooth inner surface devoid of any white marks.

Something else to note is that Haworthia fasciata is considered a rare species.

Hordes of succulent beginners tend to think that the Zebra plants are a stripped version of the Aloe. It’s not. Sure, they are from the same sub-family and are both native to South Africa, but there are marked differences that distinguish the two.

How to Take Care of Haworthia Fasciata

Zebra Succulent Plant
@thesucculentstore

The Zebra plants top the list in the succulents’ starter pack for beginners. They’re easy-care plants that will grow brilliantly even when most neglected. However, giving ideal growing conditions when young will ensure that Zebra plants turn out to be healthy.

Continue reading for an in-depth guide on how to grow and take care of your Zebra Haworthia.

What is the ideal temperature for the Zebra plant?

This xerophyte has been long adapted to desert conditions and will therefore thrive even in high heat levels. As an indoor plant, it will do just fine with room temperatures between spring and autumn. During winter, it prefers cool temperatures. However, Haworthia fasciata can’t tolerate freezing or anything below 4°C.

As the case with many succulents, the Zebra plants don’t require any humidity.

Light requirements for haworthia fasciata

Although The Zebra plants are total sun zealot, they can also do well in partial shades. If growing outdoors, find a spot where your Haworthia will receive at least four hours of bright, indirect sunlight. Indoor Zebra plants will receive adequate lighting when placed near a huge, uncovered south-facing window.

Avoid exposing your Haworthia fasciata to direct sunshine for long hours especially during summer. This leads to sunburn, giving the leaves an undesirable purple, red or brown color. Similarly, placing your Zebra plants in a shade for extended periods will result in weak and lanky plants. Avoid both extremes for robust growth.

For our indoor plants, we prefer this lighting system as so much can be adjusted to perfectly fit our needs.

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Soil & Fertilizing

The ideal soil for Haworthia fasciata is grainy and well-draining to ensure that the plant does not sit on damp soil for long. The best bet is a commercial cacti mix which you can easily buy online.

 

We highly recommend this soil mix. It is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, it helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants.

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Give your Zebra plant a weak solution of fertilizer occasionally. Twice or thrice a year is probably too much. Do NOT feed it during winter.

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Watering your Zebra Plant

The Zebra cactus can go for long periods without water. On that account, they can cope with under watering but easily succumb to root rot due to overwatering. In warm climates, watering it once a week is recommended. Water the Zebra plant once a fortnight in cooler areas.

Use the “soak and dry” method to water your plants. This is giving your succulents a drench and waiting for the soil to dry out before watering again.

Minimize watering during winter as these plants lapse into inactivity.

Pests to look out for

Fortunately, Haworthia fasciata does not suffer from many pest invasions. Spider mites and mealybugs are the most common insects that occasionally plague it. Nothing too unordinary!

Haworthia Fasciata Care Tips

  1. Leaves turning red: This is due to excess sunlight. Move your zebra plant in a shaded area and the undesirable red tinge will begin to fade back to normal. (Keep in mind if your succulent is sun burnt, it may not be reversed).
  2. Leaf tips are brown and dead: This is quite normal depending on the degree of color on the tips. Browning is typically only confined to the tips of the leaves, don’t worry.
  3. Plant collapse: This is typically caused by overwatering and exposure to very cold temperatures. Warm that baby up and let it drink all of its nutrients first.

ALSO READ:

Haworthia Fasciata Succulent Plant
@plants_by_nataly

5 Reasons to Grow a Zebra Plant

  1. It’s one of the most visually appealing succulents.
  2. It requires minimal maintenance, super easy to take care of.
  3. The Zebra Plant is not poisonous, being safe for both humans and pets.
  4. They take up very little space. So much so that little baby shoes and teacups are used as planters. (We prefer to use cute planters like these).
  5. It has a long life span, perfect for gifting to generations.

How to Propagate Haworthia Fasciata

Just like Aloe, propagating Haworthia fasciata is a painless and straight forward process with a high rate of success. Either offsets or leaves can be used as propagates. When propagating using leaves, pluck a healthy leaf from the mother plant.

Allow the wound to heal for a few days. Stick the calloused leaves in a well-draining potting mix. Water only once and wait for signs of growth to water again.

Propagating using offsets is much easier and thought to have a higher success rate. Any healthy Zebra plant will often produce offsets. Use a sharp knife to neatly remove them, cutting as close to the mother plant as possible. This is to ensure that the offset gets some roots.

In some cases, a knife may be completely unnecessary as the offset may be loosely attached to the plant and come off easily with a gentle tug.

Wait a few days for the wound to heal. This is to reduce the risks of rot in the new wound. Set up the dried offset in a cacti potting mix, water slightly and place in a warm, brightly lit area.

The best time to propagate Haworthia fasciata is during summer or at the end of spring. This is because it’s warm and there is a lot of sunlight – excellent conditions for optimum growth.

Zebra plant Haworthia Fasciata
@crveni_div

Repotting Tips for Haworthia Fasciata

The zebra plant is generally tiny and slow-growing. Therefore, it might take a while for the plant to outgrow its pot. Repotting is done every so often and only when the pot is filled with offsets.

In some cases, the roots may overgrow the pot and hence a repot may be necessary. Use a similar potting mix when repotting.

The recommended time to repot is during summer or late spring. Change the soil every two years to get rid of molds, pests, and to revamp the nutrition of the soil. Read more about repotting succulents here.

Where can I buy the Zebra Plant Succulent?

Haworthia fasciata is a rare and hard to find succulent. However, during summer or spring, it can easily be sourced from nurseries, conservatories and local garden centers. If not, online stores such as Mountain crest gardens, succulent box, and Etsy may be your best bet.


Have you had enough of the Zebra Plant yet? If not be sure to spread the word to your friends about how amazing and easy it is to care for a rare succulent like this. Leave a comment below about how this article has helped you with your zebra plant.

Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complementary guide. 

Happy Planting! ?

Everything You Need to Know About the Snake Plant

Sansevieria Trifasciata— Snake Plant

Many succulents are short and squat because they’ve adapted to grow in arid climates, but not the snake plant! It’s a tropical plant that’s known for its beautiful tall leaves and color variations. Some varieties have leaves with thick, buttery yellow edges, while others have striking dark green stripes. Interior designers love this plant, and so do we―it compliments pretty much any style of decor and looks great in arrangements!

Succulents are known for being hardy, and snake plants are no exception. They’re one of the easiest types of succulents to care for, so we love to recommend them to new gardeners and people with black thumbs.

Even if you forget to water your snake plant for a month, you probably won’t kill it, so don’t let your lack of gardening prowess stop you from owning this wonderful plant!

Even though snake plants are tough, you’re still going to need our advice to keep your plant looking its best. In this article, we’ll give you lots of helpful care taking tips with some fun snake plant facts thrown in for good measure, so keep reading!

Snake plants in white planters sansevieria trifasciata
@succsandpups

Sansevieria Trifasciata— the Snake Plant

History and Origin

Snake plants are native to tropical West Africa and are an important part of African culture. Nigerians believe that the plant provides spiritual protection. They use it in a ritual to remove the evil eye, a malevolent stare that casts a curse on its victims. This succulent is also associated with several African gods, including the god of war.

The Chinese also think that this plant brings good luck like the jade plant. They believe that the gods will bestow the eight virtues, which include long life and prosperity, onto its caretakers. Even if this succulent didn’t bring us good luck, we’d still keep it around because it’s so pretty!

Sansevieria Trifasciata

Snake plants are a type of Sansevieria, which is a genus made up of seventy different flowering plants. These plants are grouped together because they all have shared characteristics like narrow, upright leaves and short, thick roots.

Because the snake plant belongs to the genus Sansevieria, its full scientific name is Sansevieria Trifasciata. The second word in its name, Trifasciata, comes from Latin. It means “marked with three bands.” Several snake plant varieties are variegated, which is just a fancy way of saying that their leaves have different colored streaks. These colorful markings are why snake plants got the name Trifasciata.

In addition to its scientific name, the snake plant has a few nicknames. It’s often called mother-in-law’s tongue because of its sharp, pointed leaves. If you ever buy this succulent for your mother-in-law, don’t tell her what it’s called!

Snake plants are also known as viper’s bowstring hemp because they have strong fibers that were once used to make bowstrings.

Snake plant in black planter
@perryscorners1855

How to Care for Snake Plants

Best Soil for Snake Plants

Snake plants are sensitive to water and prone to root rot, so it’s important to plant them in soil that drains well. Commercial succulent or cactus soil is great for them because it has added sand that helps with drainage. Read our best soil article to understand what the best soil mix is for your succulents.

You can also make your own succulent soil from scratch. You’ll save some money and get to control exactly what goes into it, so try it out if you can. There are lots of homemade soil recipes floating around on the Internet, but we like to use three parts of potting soil, two parts of coarse sand like builder’s sand, and one part of pumice.

We won’t lie, though―as much as we love a good DIY, we usually use commercial succulent soil because it’s more convenient.

We highly recommend this soil mix by Bonsai Jack. It is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, it helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. Go ahead and get the 7 Gallon Bag if you are plant nerd like us :). Pick up some of our favorite soil by clicking here: Bonsai Jack Succulent Soil.

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Repotting Snake Plants

Unlike other succulents, snake plants prefer to be a little squished in their pots. You don’t have to repot these guys until they’re busting out. Wait until you see obvious signs of overgrowth, like excessive top heaviness that makes your plant topple over or roots that stick out of the drainage hole. You can expect to repot your snake plants every three to six years.

Here’s some nifty geometric planters in case you want to get fancy.

Repotting a snake plant is pretty easy, but there are still a few things you need to know. Snake plants like to be root bound, so each time you repot yours, choose a pot that’s only a few inches larger than the old one. The pot you pick should definitely have a drainage hole because snake plants can rot if they sit in any water.

When you’re ready to repot, get your succulent soil and fill the new pot about a third of the way full. Support your succulent by placing your hand on top of the soil and gently turn the pot over. Your plant should pop right out, but if it doesn’t, try tapping on the sides of the pot a little. If it just doesn’t want to come out no matter what you do (we’ve all been there), try watering it. Soaking the soil will loosen the roots and make it easier for you to get your plant out. 

Now, place your plant in the new pot and see where it sits. If your plant sits one to two inches below the pot’s rim, you’re good to go! If not, add or remove soil until it’s positioned properly. Allow your succulent some time to adjust to its new pot before you water it―a few days is usually enough.

Hold off on fertilizing it for a few weeks, too, so that you don’t damage its unestablished roots.

ALSO READ:

Snake plants in modern planters
@my_green_home_and_me

How Much Water Does a Snake Plant Need?

Succulents need a lot less water than other kinds of plants, and they also need a different watering schedule. Succulents do best when you let their soil dry out completely between waterings, which usually takes about a week.

Snake plants require a bit less water than other succulents, so you may want to water yours every week and a half to two weeks instead of every week.

How to Water a Snake Plant

To water your snake plant, fill up a watering can and pour water onto the soil until it starts to run out of the drainage hole of the pot. Make sure that your succulent doesn’t sit in any water―if you keep your pot on a saucer, lift up the pot once or twice a day and drain any excess water. Make sure that the soil is dry to the touch before you water your succulent again.

Considering that succulents need less water than other plants, it sounds a little strange to flood your snake plant with water every other week. But trust us―this watering schedule works!

If you’re still unsure how much water you’ll need, read our complete watering guide for succulents here. (It’s helped over 2000 succulent lovers to date!)

Snake Plant Light Requirements

Snake plants love indirect sunlight, but they’re pretty adaptable and can survive in full sun and low light conditions. Because they only need indirect sunlight to thrive, they make great houseplants like these.

To keep your snake plant healthy and happy, try placing it near an east facing window. These windows provide a few hours of direct sunlight in the morning and indirect sunlight for the rest of the day, which is perfect for this plant. If you want to keep it close to a brighter south or west facing window, just make sure that you shield it from the sun’s rays by closing the blinds a little. Too much direct sunlight will burn the leaves of your snake plant.

Outside, the best place to put your snake plants is in the shade. While they can be planted in areas that get full sun, we don’t really recommend it. In full sun they’re much more likely to develop symptoms of sun damage, like dark brown spots on their leaves. You’ll also have to water them more often because the heat from the sun causes the soil to dry out faster. If you’re not always great at remembering to water your plants, keep them in the shade!

If you’re dying to plant this gorgeous succulent in a sunny spot in your garden, we get it! We think it would look fab out there too. Just make sure you keep a close eye on it and have shade cloth on hand in case it starts to burn.

Snake plant Sansevieria Trifasciata
@plantsandcindy

Snake Plant Temperature Requirements

Just like real snakes, snake plants don’t like the cold! They can’t tolerate temperatures below 40°F. If you leave them outside in freezing temperatures, the water inside their cells can freeze, expand, and burst their cell walls.

This will cause tissue damage and make the leaves look brown and mushy in certain spots. Your plant can even die if it’s left outside in the cold for too long! If temperatures in your area drop to forty degrees, make sure you bring your outdoor snake plant inside or put some frost cloth over it to keep it as warm as possible.

If you keep your plant inside, that’s ideal. Snake plants do best in temperatures between seventy and ninety degrees, so indoor environments are perfect for them. They’ll reward you for keeping them indoors by purifying the air you breathe. They remove toxins like formaldehyde from the air and release lots of oxygen, improving the air circulation in your home.

Best Fertilizer for Snake Plants

Fertilizer can encourage your snake plants to flower and help them grow faster. You can fertilize them as often as once per month during the spring and summer months.

To get the best results, use a balanced fertilizer. You can tell that a fertilizer is balanced if it has three identical numbers on the package, like 8-8-8. These numbers indicate that the fertilizer contains equal proportions of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, the three main nutrients in fertilizer. We recommend that you pick up an 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 formula and dilute it to half strength before applying it to your succulent.

Pests

Succulents can sometimes get infested with pests like mealybugs. Plants that are kept outdoors and ones that are overwatered are more susceptible to infestations, but any plant can become infected.

The two main pests you need to watch out for are mealybugs and spider mites. They stymie your plant’s growth and suck the sap from its leaves, wounding them in the process. If they’re left on your plant long enough, they can even kill it. That’s why it’s so important to get rid of these nasty little critters as soon as you spot them!

Mealybugs are often mistaken for mold because they’re white and fuzzy. If you see lots of white, fuzzy spots on your plant, grab some isopropyl alcohol and put it in a spray bottle or on a q-tip. Spray or wipe the affected areas with the alcohol. Do this as many times as it takes to get rid of all the mealybugs.

Because they’re so small, you probably won’t be able to see the spider mites on your plant, but you will be able to see the damage. Spider mite damage appears as small yellow and brown spots on your plant’s leaves. These mites are related to spiders, so they’ll also leave webbing on your plant that looks similar to a spider web. If you see any of these warning signs, start spraying your succulent’s leaves, especially the undersides, with water and insecticidal soap or neem oil.

Propagating Snake Plants

One of the reasons why we love succulents is because you can get baby plants from them for free through a process called propagation.

Division is one of the most popular ways to propagate snake plants because it preserves the variegation patterns of the mother plant. If you want your new snake plant’s leaves to have the same thick yellow borders as your old plant, then don’t propagate it with leaf cuttings or rhizomes―divide your plant instead.

Propagating Leaf Cuttings

To take a leaf cutting, grab a sharp knife or a pair of shears and cut a leaf off of your plant. You want to make the cut pretty close to the bottom of the plant.

Now, take that leaf and cut it up again into a few different sections. As you’re cutting, make sure that you note which end of each section is the bottom. The “bottom” of each cutting is the side that was closest to the roots of the main plant when it was still attached.

If you plant the top sides of the cuttings in soil, they won’t root, so that’s why this step is so important. We like to take a non-toxic sharpie or pen and mark which sides we need to plant so that we don’t get confused.

Leave these cuttings to dry out for a few days. Then, fill a planting tray or pot with succulent soil and plant the cuttings bottom side down in the soil. You should keep them in bright, indirect sunlight and mist them with a spray bottle once a day to keep them moist.

Propagating succulents from leaves isn’t an exact science, and not every leaf will take, but you should see some roots and buds after a few weeks. Once your baby succulent grows a bit larger, you can water it the same way you water your mature snake plants.

3 snake plants in modern white planters
@philodendro

Propagating Rhizome Cuttings

Propagating rhizome cuttings is pretty much the same process as propagating leaves. If you’re not familiar with rhizomes, they’re kind of like roots, except they grow horizontally. Plants that have them use them to store nutrients. Rhizomes sometimes sprout up through the soil near your main plant and grow new leaves. They can be cut and used to grow new succulents.

It’s important to wait until a rhizome sprouts a leaf before you cut it. Once that happens, take a sharp garden knife and cut the rhizome as close to the bottom as you can. Allow the cutting to dry out for a few days, and then plant it in soil, cut side down. Water this cutting the same way you watered the leaves.

Dividing Snake Plants

You can also cut your snake plant in half with a sharp knife to gain a brand new plant. Like we mentioned earlier, division is the best way to ensure that your new plant will have the same variegation as your main plant.

Cut your plant and its root structure in half right down the middle. Plant each half in its own pot with some succulent soil. Allow these plants to take root for a few days before you water them, and then water them as normal.


By now you’re probably dying to run to your local garden center and pick up one of these plants. We don’t blame you! Snake plants are beautiful, low maintenance houseplants that anyone can grow and enjoy regardless of their gardening skill level.

We love their gorgeous tall leaves, color variations, and greenish white flowers. We hope that this guide has helped you figure out how to take care of a snake plant once you get it home from the nursery, whether or not you have a green thumb!

Last update on 2021-10-26 / Amazon

Leave a comment below about what you enjoyed learning about in this article, we’re curious! And if you have a new snake plant after this, let us know the progress of your succulent baby, happy planting!

Enjoyed learning about Snake Plants? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully. With this ebook you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

7 Succulent Care Tips

7 Succulent Care Tips

Succulents may not be a real scientific plant family, but they do have a lot of the same characteristics. Succulents are all drought tolerant. They have shallow roots that soak up as much water as possible and swollen leaves that store it for a not-so-rainy day.

Because succulents have these shared traits, you can care for each species in roughly the same way. Succulents require a lot less water than other plants and need lots of sunlight. They all need soil with good drainage, too, and a few other things that we’re going to talk about today.

Here’s our list of seven general succulent care tips that will keep your plant looking nice and healthy!

Keep the soil dry

Succulents, especially cacti, are super sensitive to water. Succulents are resilient little plants that can survive almost anything, but not overwatering. Their roots will rot and they’ll start to attract pests like mealybugs. You’ll have no choice but to toss your beloved succulent in the trash. Unfortunately, we’ve been there.

If you don’t want to make the same mistakes that we did, then make sure you let your succulent’s soil dry out completely in between waterings.

 

Sloth succulent planter
@botanicalsmh

Use the right soil

Using the right soil can also stop your succulent from rotting. The best soil for succulents will have sand and gritty stones in it like perlite and pumice to promote drainage. Perlite and pumice are porous, which allows water to pass through them easily and helps water drain out of the pot faster.

Commercial succulent and cactus soils have these kinds of ingredients, so they’ll do the trick. But you can also create your own custom soil blend using a few simple ingredients. We like to use three parts of regular potting soil, two parts of a gritty sand like builder’s sand, and one part of either perlite or pumice in our mix. If you want to go the pre-made route (I don’t blame you), our choice is down below!

Our Pick
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10/26/2021 12:58 pm GMT

Still unsure of what soil to use that’s best for your succulent? Be sure to read our in depth guide for succulent soil, at the end of this article!Tit’s helped hundreds of people so far.

Give your plant some air

Something that’s important for succulent health but isn’t often talked about is airflow. Succulents need to have a little room to breathe (I know I do sometimes), so you shouldn’t place them too close together in arrangements if you can help it.

Tight arrangements look great, but may have drainage issues. In order for the soil to dry out properly, enough air has to get to the soil and the roots, and tightly packed arrangements prevent that. If you space them out a little, your plants will have much healthier roots and more room to grow.

Space is good!

Give your succulent plenty of sun

Good ol’ sun rays!

Most succulents come from sunny, warm environments like the desert and the tropics, so they need lots of sunlight to stay healthy. Even succulents like the Snake Plant that can thrive in low light conditions love to get several hours of bright, indirect sunlight every day.

Try to give your succulents between six and eight hours of bright sunlight each day. Your plants will appear more vibrant and healthy if you keep them near one of the sunniest windows in your home, like a south or west facing window.

Giving your succulent babies plenty of sun will also prevent them from getting etiolated. Etiolation happens when a succulent isn’t getting enough sunlight and starts stretching towards the nearest light source, often growing sideways. Etiolated succulents also grow tall very quickly and end up looking quite “stretched out.” It’s definitely something you want to prevent from happening, so put your succulents someplace where they can soak up the sun!

Succulents on top of wooden benches
@lachicabotanica

Don’t let your succulent get too cold

Some succulents, such as Hens and Chicks and Sedums, can survive in freezing temps. But most succulents will actually get brown, mushy leaves if you leave them out in the cold. This is because the water they store in their leaves starts to freeze, which destroys their tissues. Once it happens, this damage is irreversible, so you want to make sure that you bring your outdoor succulent inside when it gets too chilly.

Every succulent has a different range of temperatures it can tolerate, so make sure you do a little research to find out when it’s time to bring your particular succulent inside for the winter.

Use fertilizer

Succulents are known for being slow growers, but fertilizer helps them pick up the pace. It also encourages flowering succulent plants to bloom, so if you want to see your baby flower, pick up some fertilizer.

For most succulents, we recommend using a low balanced, water soluble fertilizer. Balanced fertilizers contain equal amounts of the three main nutrients that your plant needs—nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. You’ll know a fertilizer is balanced if it has three identical numbers on the package, like 8-8-8 or 10-10-10.

“Low balanced” just means that the fertilizer isn’t very concentrated. Succulents need a lot less fertilizer than other plants, and can get burned if you use a fertilizer that’s too strong. That’s why we recommend low balanced fertilizers like 8-8-8 and 10-10-10 blends. Stay away from concentrated fertilizers with high numbers on their packaging, like 20-20-20 blends.

Even though you’re using a low balanced fertilizer, you should still dilute it to half strength to make sure that your plant won’t burn. If you’re using a water soluble fertilizer, you can do this by dissolving half as much fertilizer as the package recommends into the same amount of water. So, if the package tells you to mix one tablespoon of fertilizer into a gallon of water, you should only use half a tablespoon of fertilizer for the whole gallon.

Our Pick
Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food
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Made for all cacti, jade, aloe, and other popular succulents.

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10/26/2021 01:01 pm GMT

Some people fertilize their succulents weekly, but we like to fertilize ours less often. Once a month is our sweet spot. The best time to fertilize is when your succulent is actively growing, which is usually in the summer, but can vary from species to species.

 

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Figure out the species of your succulent

That brings us to our last point! If you can, figure out which types of succulents you own. Not all succulents grow during the same time of year, so figuring out which species you have will help you administer fertilizer at the right time. Each succulent has slightly different light and water requirements, too. Knowing which succulents you have will help you give better overall care to your plant babies.

You can start off by figuring out if your succulent grows better in the summer or winter here.


Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent or even Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth today!

We hope that this post has helped you learn all about how to take care of succulent plants! If you need more guidance, check out some of our other posts. Happy planting!

Monocarpic Succulent: What are Monocarpic Succulents?

What are monocarpic succulents

Seeing your flowering succulents bloom is exciting. Succulents produce bright, beautiful blooms in many colors like red, white, yellow, pink and purple. When you start to see flowers stalks shooting up from your succulent, it’s hard not to smile and wait impatiently for it to bloom!

But sometimes, right after that big beautiful display of flowers, succulents turn black and die. If this has ever happened to you, don’t worry—it’s completely normal. Some succulents are monocarpic, which means they die right after they flower.

There are things you can do to delay your plant’s blooms, but eventually, all monocarpic plants flower and die. Today we’re going to teach you all about this natural phenomenon and give you some tips that will keep your plant baby healthy for as long as possible.

Monocarpic succulent plants flowering
@pinkandplants

Definition of Monocarpic

Like we mentioned above, monocarpic plants are ones that die shortly after flowering or producing fruit. In Greek, “mono” means single and “karpos” means fruit, so it makes sense that plants that only flower or fruit once are called monocarpic. Plants that flower again and again over the course of their life cycle are called polycarpic plants, meaning “many fruits” in Greek.

Monocarpic succulents die because flowering takes up all of the energy that they have. These plants divert all of their resources to producing flowers because they contain seeds that will create brand new plants. Just like most living things, a succulent’s goal is to reproduce, so that’s why the plant devotes so much energy to produce flowers and seeds.

After monocarpic succulents sprout flowers, they can’t sustain themselves anymore because they have no nutrients or energy left over. Sadly, the monocarpic starts to turn black and die.

Many monocarpic succulents, like Hens and Chicks, live several years before they flower, while some succulents like the Century Plant take decades to flower. So don’t worry—you’ll get plenty of time with your succulent plant before it dies.

Types of Monocarpic Succulents

Agave, Sempervivum, and Kalanchoe plants are the three main types of monocarpic succulents. All Sempervivums are monocarpic, but not all varieties of Kalanchoe and Agave plants are. You’ll have to look up which species of succulent you have to determine whether or not it’s monocarpic.

(Comment below if you’d like Succulent City to make a database of monocarpic succulents for you).

Some Aeoniums and varieties of Yucca, like the Joshua Tree, are considered to be monocarpic as well even though they don’t die right after flowering.

I know what you’re thinking… aren’t all monocarpic plants supposed to die right after flowering? How can you call a plant monocarpic if it doesn’t die?!

Well, these plants do die, in a sense. Individual branches on these plants flower one at a time and then die, but it doesn’t kill the whole plant. These plants still have many other branches that continue to grow and thrive.

So, some monocarpic succulents don’t die after all. But is there anything you can do to keep the ones that do, like Hens and Chicks, from dying?

Monocarpic succulents sempervivums
@justgrowsucculents

Can I Stop My Monocarpic Succulents from Dying?

The answer is… maybe.

Some gardeners have been able to stop their monocarpic succulents from dying but the success rate is not as probable as succulent lovers might love to have.

If you take good care of your succulents, a lot of them won’t flower as quickly. Succulents may flower early when they’re under stress due to lack of water or sunlight. They do this in the hopes that their seeds will end up somewhere with better growing conditions. So make sure that you give your plant plenty of bright sunlight and enough water.

You can try to cheat nature and keep your succulent alive even longer by cutting the flower stalk down as soon as you see it. This works best with Kalanchoe plants, which have flower stalks that are easy to cut off, but you can also cut the blooms out of Sempervivums. (Here’s a list of gardening tools that can help you accomplish this).

When Sempervivums start to bloom, the leaves in the center of the rosette close up and the rosette tilts upwards. Eventually, the center of the rosette will grow into a tall plant stem that can get to be a few inches to a foot tall. As soon as you see your Hens and Chicks plant begin to tilt upwards, you need to cut out its central leaves if you hope to save it.

Monocarpic succulent plant succulent city
@st3jewellery

Grab a garden knife and use it to separate the tight, tilted leaves in the center of the rosette from the rest of the leaves. Make sure you remove everything and get a nice clean cut. Watch your Hens and Chicks for new growth in the coming weeks. If you see new offsets forming in the center of the rosette, then the procedure was a success!

We’ve never tried this method, but we can’t imagine that it has a high success rate. Your succulent may try to flower again, so one procedure may not be enough to keep it alive. Cutting out so many leaves will also change the way your plant looks. New offsets will form in the center, which can make your plant look a little wonky. We still think this method is worth trying, though. We’d rather have an imperfectly shaped plant than no plant at all!

If you’d rather sit back and let nature take its course, that’s great too! Enjoy the beautiful blooms that your succulent will produce over the coming weeks, and try to harvest the seeds to grow more plants later. If you take care of the offsets that your plant produced during its lifetime, that bare spot in your garden will be filled in no time!

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We hope that this post has shed some light on this rather confusing topic! If you’ve just discovered that your succulent is monocarpic, or figured out the reason why one of your plants randomly died on you a few years ago, let us know in the comments below. Happy planting!

Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complementary guide.