How to Make a Beautiful Succulent Wreath

We love wreaths! They make front doors seem so much more welcoming and inviting. They really increase the curb appeal of your house too! You can put up a festive wreath to celebrate a holiday or put up a simple floral. The succulent wreath will look good at any time of year. The possibilities are endless! 

Fake wreaths look nice, but for that extra special design touch, we recommend making your own living succulent wreath! Succulent wreaths have a natural vibrancy and beauty that fake wreaths can’t match. You can even create festive wreaths for any occasion using succulents! How cute would a wreath full of lush green succulents and red holly berries look on your door at Christmastime? 

How to Make a Beautiful Succulent Wreath
For Your Home Decoration @andsucculents

Gather Your Supplies 

To make your living succulent wreath. You’ll need to purchase a few things: a sharp pair of scissors, a living wreath form, greening pins, and a wreath hanger. If you want to add any festive seasonal elements to your wreaths, like some acorns or small Christmas ornaments, you should buy those things too. 

You’ll also need about 50 to 75 succulent cuttings, depending on how full you want your wreath to look. Once you have all your supplies, it’s time to make your wreath! 

Take Your Succulent Cuttings 

You should take your succulent cuttings a few days before you want to make your wreath. This will give them a chance to dry out and callus over. Which will prevent their roots from rotting when you plant them in the wreath form. Make sure that all the cuttings you take have a one or two-inch stem. Because it makes them easier to stick in the wreath.

You can take cuttings from succulents you already have, or go out and purchase some new plants. What a great excuse to go to the garden center and buy more plants! 

Soak Your Wreath Form

Once your succulent cuttings have dried out, you’re ready to make your wreath! Get out your wreath form and a bowl of water big enough to fit it. Submerge the wreath in the water and leave it to soak up some moisture for a few hours. Your succulent cuttings won’t be able to root unless you get the moss in your wreath form nice and wet, so don’t skip this step! 

Be sure to also check out “7 Succulent Bouquets You Wish You Knew About” for more amazing crafts you can do with your succulents.

How to Make a Beautiful Succulent Wreath
Make Your Own Wreath @chitake_succulent

Lay Out Your Design 

Before you start planting your succulents, you should lay them out on a table and decide how you want to arrange them. It’s much easier to make alterations to your design before you start planting your succulents—once your cuttings are in the wreath form, they can be pretty tricky to pull out!  

We recommend using a mixture of big and small succulents and ones with different colors and textures to create the most interesting wreath. You should also consider incorporating some trailing succulents into your design—as they grow, they’ll cascade down from the wreath, which creates a really beautiful look! 

Plant Your Succulent Cuttings 

Once you’ve finalized your design, grab your scissors and your succulent cuttings and get planting! Use the tip of your scissors to make a hole in the moss, and then push your succulent cutting down into the space you made. Then secure the base of your cutting to the wreath using a greening pin. 

Do the same for any ornaments, acorns, or other objects you want to incorporate into the wreath. Repeat this process until the whole wreath is covered with succulents and looking beautiful! 

Caring for Your Wreath 

Your succulent cuttings will take about six weeks to root, but because you secured them with greening pins, you can hang up your wreath now without them falling out. If you don’t want to use greening pins, just wait to hang your wreath for six weeks. 

Ideally, you should hang your wreath somewhere that gets bright but indirect sunlight. You should also water it about once every two weeks to keep all the succulents looking nice and fresh! The easiest way to do this is to fill up a bowl with water and then soak the underside of the wreath for a few minutes. Let the wreath dry for an hour or so before you hang it back up on your wall or door so it doesn’t leave water stains! Don’t forget to check out our full guide on watering your succulents in “How Often To Water Cactus“.

ALSO READ:

How to Make a Beautiful Succulent Wreath
Care For Your Wreath @paper_and_bloom

Now that you know how to make a beautiful succulent wreath of your own, are you going to try it? Let us know in the comments section below, and be sure to share your creations with us on Instagram

Enjoyed learning about “How to Make a Beautiful Succulent Wreath”? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “Rare Succulents You Wish You Knew About“. With this ebook you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents. 

Happy Planting! 🌵

What to Do When You Underwater Succulents?

Succulents don’t need a lot of water to survive, but that doesn’t mean they don’t need any! If you’ve been going weeks and weeks without watering your succulents, they’re probably looking brown, dry, and wrinkled—far from their usual healthy, plump appearance.

If you want to save your succulents, you’re going to have to change the way you water them right away. So keep reading to learn the right way to water your succulents. And what to do to revive them when you’ve been underwatering them for a while! 

What to Do When You Underwater Succulents
Watering Your Succulents @jobesorganics

Water Your Succulents Immediately

As soon as you notice symptoms of underwatering in your succulents, like brown, shriveled up leaves, you should give your plants a deep soak. Grab a watering can and fill it up to the top. Then water your plants until you see water coming out of the drainage holes of the pots.

If you’ve been habitually underwatering your succulents, that probably sounds like a lot of water! But succulents actually prefer to be watered this way. Succulents like to get a large amount of water about once every one or two weeks. Soak it all up, and then sit in dry soil for a while. The other houseplants you own would probably wilt and die on that kind of watering schedule. But it works for succulents and cacti! For a more detailed look at watering your succulent, check out “When You Should Water Your Succulents” for more.

After one or two of these deep soaks, your succulents should be looking healthy and plump again. If you keep your succulents on a consistent watering schedule from now on, they’ll prosper and thrive! 

But what should you do if your succulents are so severely underwatered that they still look dry and wrinkled after a few goods soak? The answer is water therapy.

What to Do When You Underwater Succulents
Water Therapy for Your Succulents @liketrylove

Water Therapy for Severely Underwatered Succulents 

If your succulents are severely underwatered and on the brink of death, they probably won’t respond to traditional watering methods. That’s when you know it’s time to try water therapy. 

Water therapy replenishes the water supply of underwatered succulents better than watering because it involves soaking your succulent’s roots in water. This isn’t something you should try as a first intervention, though. It’s definitely a last resort because it’s a little risky. Your plant’s roots might get damaged or start to rot, especially if you don’t get all the soil out of them. So don’t try this if you’re an inexperienced gardener or if your plant is just starting to show signs of underwatering. 

To perform water therapy on your severely shriveled succulent, fill up a container with water. Shake all of the soil out of your succulent roots, then lower them into the water. Make sure that you position your plant carefully! Only the roots should be submerged, not the leaves or any other part of your plant. Be sure to also check out “5 Tips on Saving Dying Succulents” for more tips to caring for your succulent.

A Good Care

After your succulent is all situated in the water, you should leave it to soak for 24 to 72 hours. When it’s time to remove your plant from the water, make sure you handle it with extra care. Your succulent’s roots will be especially sensitive to damage and bruising after getting out of the water bath, so be really gentle with them! 

We like to set our succulents out to dry for a few days to lower the chances that their sensitive roots will get damaged during the replanting process. Then we plant them in a succulent soil and go back to a regular, routine watering schedule. Find out the best possible soil to plant your succulents in, check out “Best Soil for Succulents” for more.

Unfortunately, water therapy doesn’t always work. Sometimes succulents are too far gone to be saved, or the plant’s roots get damaged during the water therapy process. That’s why it’s important to prevent underwatering in the first place so you don’t lose any of your beloved succulents!

ALSO READ:

What to Do When You Underwater Succulents
Save Your Succulents @theplantstudent

Prevent Underwatering in the Future

The best way to save an underwatered succulent is to prevent it from becoming underwatered in the first place! 

We know that it can be hard to remember to water your plants. You have a busy life with so much going on, so sometimes your plants and their needs slip under the radar. This is especially true if you own lots of houseplants that require special care or different watering schedules from each other. But it’s super important to water your succulents consistently so they don’t shrivel up and die again! 

Personally, we use apps like Waterbug and Planty to remind us to water our plants. They give us a notification on our phone whenever it’s time for us to water one of our plants. These apps allow us to set different watering schedules for each one of our houseplants, so we don’t have to keep all those watering requirements straight in our heads.

We’ve found apps to be a big help, but if you’re not technologically savvy, you could write down a watering schedule for your plants on a Post It and put it in a place where you’ll see it every day. That way you’re less likely to forget to give your plants a drink! 

Another thing you can do to keep your succulents healthy between waterings is to increase the humidity around them. Believe it or not, the air in your home is actually too dry for your succulents and cacti! Most homes have a humidity level of 30 percent or lower, and the ideal humidity level for succulents is 40 percent or higher. So your succulents are losing moisture pretty quickly just by sitting in your living room! 

Be sure to also read “Dangers of an Underwatered Succulent” for info on what could happen if you don’t keep up with your succulents.

What to Do When You Underwater Succulents
The Ideal Level of Humidity @thisismamabritt

If you have some succulents in your collection that are looking dry and shriveled, we hope this article helps you nurse them back to health! If you have any more questions about underwatered succulents, leave them in the comments section below or head to the Succulent City Plant Lounge to get some advice from other succulent gardeners. 

Enjoyed learning about “What to Do When You Underwater Succulents?”? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “The Correct Way to Water Succulents“. With this ebook you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting! 🌵

Definitive Guide To 5 Types of Air Plants

Have you seen those plants that look like they are growing from nothing? With no soil anywhere near them and no visible roots, they are a sight-for-sore eyes as they dangle in the air from wire baskets, hooks and chandelier-like containers! You may have spotted some with furry, silver leaves or others with glossy leaves, while some present the most vibrant colored flowers.

These tiny, floating, evergreen perennials are known as air plants.

Air plants go by the scientific name Tillandsia, and there are over 650 varieties of this species! They are originally found hanging on for dear life in the tropical climates of South and Central America as well as southern parts of the United States.

Tillandsias have the unique feature of being epiphytes– which means they do not require soil but more rely on water and air to grow. This attribute has Tillandsias attaching themselves to trees, shrubs, rocks, fences and telephone posts, but they do not feed off the host.

These amazing, un-demanding plants are brilliant for decorating small spaces and look adorable peeking out of sea shells, against a piece of drift wood, suspended on wire baskets and vases or semi-enclosed in glass baubles.

If you are looking for a plant that looks more like a pet without the hassle of cleaning up after it, here are a variety of 5 types of air plants to add a kick of personality to your home or office.

And before you learn about them, sign up for a FREE 30-day trial of Amazon’s Prime Membership! Get that FREE 2-day shipping on all your new air plant necessities! Click here to learn more and sign up today. Think of this as a thank you gift from Succulent City for keeping up with our articles.

5 Types of Air Plants
5 Types of Air Plants @carmenmcnall

Tillandsia Caput-Medusae

Wouldn’t it be fun to have a plant that is referred to as the goddess of Greek mythology, Medusa? Absolutely yes! If the name alone does not peak your interest, you will be blown away by its thick, wide silvery-green leaves that curl as they grow, giving the impression of the snakes on Medusa’s head reaching out to you.

This gorgeous, evergreen air plant is a South American native, sprouting heavily in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Its leaves appear grey-blue in color and are arranged like rosettes. The twisting leaves grow from a bulbous base, can get to 25 cm long and have fine, grey hairs all around them.

T. Caput-Medusae pulls out all the floral stops as it blooms from spring to the beginning of summer. It produces delicate purple flowers that are about 3.2 cm long from a pale pink bract. Pups grow from the bottom of the plant after flowering and these can either be left to form a clump, or can be propagated when they reach 1/3 the size of the ‘mother plant’.

A fun fact about the T. Caput-Medusae is it can be mounted sideways or upside down and it will still grow straight in the direction they are in. These beauties do not abide by the laws of gravity like many other plants do. So you can hanging them in a planter like this one, or like this one and have no issues!

When looking for a truly unique looking statement plant, look no further than T. Caput Medusa. We promise that, unlike the myth, you won’t turn into stone when you stare at it!

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Caput-Medusae @flowerheartseverywhere

Tillandsia Cyanea – Pink Quill Plant

The Tillandsia Cyanea is an indigenous resident of the rainforests of Ecuador, boasting large, bright pink bracts arranged in the shape of a paddle, that gives it the name Pink Quill plant. Its Latin name, Cyanea, means ‘blue,’ and refers to the blue-purple hue of the flowers. The leaves are long and green.

Peeping out of the sides of the fan-like quill are blue-purple-violet flowers, appearing at most 2 at a time and last for only a couple of days. The plant blooms during spring and autumn. The quill itself, which is technically the inflorescence of the plant, can stand tall for as long as 4 months, bringing a burst of color wherever it’s positioned.

This epiphytic perennial is unique because unlike most air plants, the Pink Quill can grow in soil, so you can plant it in a cool planter like this one! It has tough, dark green, grass-like leaves and can develop to be 20 inches (50 cm) high by 20 inches (50 cm) wide.

This hardy houseplant can handle dry conditions like a true champion, although it does like good air circulation and temperatures not below 7°C (45°F). This tropical stunner enjoys its moments in the sun, but direct, strong sunshine will leave the plant with sunburn.

Did you know that air plants, along with succulents, are trending in becoming decor for weddings? Take a look at this article and you’ll really be inspired!

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Cyanea – Pink Quill Plant @brandon_nxs

Tillandsia Ionantha Maxima Huamelula

Catching the eye of everyone who passes by is the Tillandsia Ionantha Maxima Huamelula or simply known as T.Maxima . When in bloom, this upright shaped plant proudly shows off bright hues of pink, purple, blue and green, while bearing a resemblance to an enchanting firework display.

The rare T.Maxima has thick, moss green, succulent leaves that burst out from a central point, with the leaves starting off dark green at the base and turning pinkish-red towards the tips when exposed to strong light. The plant generates multiple, striking purple flowers with yellow tips, producing more than 5 flowers all at once.

This air plant originates from Oaxaca in Mexico and has been known to grow up to 6 inches tall. The T.Maxima’s colorful and unusual form gives it that wow factor when mounted on a piece of bark or driftwood, if not sitting pretty in a terrarium. But to also keep up with their tropical theme, we thought you may like these flamingo planters!

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Ionantha Maxima Huamelula @mj.0512

Tillandsia Harrisii

The Tillandsia Harrisii is a very exceptional plant that is held dear to the hearts of many botanists, as it was named after an American air plant enthusiast named Bill Harris who was brutally murdered in Guatemala in 1985.

This distinctive air plant has silvery- grey leaves that are curled in a dense rosette along its stem and are usually falling towards one side. It is considered to be a caulescent species— which defines it as a plant that grows along a stem that is above the ground.

T.Harrissi displays a deep- red inflorescence that consists of 5 to 9 spirally positioned, purple- violet flowers with blue-violet petals and orange to red bracts. These magnificent colors create a sheer contrast to the grey-green leaves of the plant. As a slow grower, it may not produce blooms until after a year or two.

The T.Harrisii thrives under bright indirect light and away from full sunshine, so a sunny window or nook is the perfect spot for it. It also prefers moderate humidity with a good air flow to prosper. Try storing yours in a unique planter like this one, it’ll fit perfectly on your desk at work or night table at home!

This easy care plant is native to Guatemala and requires a CITES permit that certifies that the plant was sustainably grown and not collected from nature.

BE SURE TO ALSO READ:

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Harrisii @pot_plants_windy

Tillandsia Stricta

The ever-popular Tillandsia Stricta is an evergreen air plant and a local resident of Trinidad, Venezuela, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Guyana and northern Argentina. The plant can take root on sand dunes as well as under tropical rainforests, making it a highly adaptable plant. According to its climate, Tillandsia Stricta may have soft flexible leaves or firmer rigid leaves and can vary in size and color.  

This air plant’s scientific name (stricta) translates to ‘erect’ and illustrates the upright habit of this plant. It also ties into the plants’ colloquial names; Upright Air Plant, Strict Tillandsia and Erect Tillandsia.

The Tillandsia Stricta is a clump-forming perennial with short stemmed leaves that grow into thick rosettes. This compact species has dark green leaves and produces attractive pink and white floral bracts when in bloom. The bracts hold a showy bright blue flower that sadly only lasts a day, although the bracts remain vibrant for up to 10 weeks.

Known to be one of the fastest growing species, the Tillandsia Stricta is a decorators dream– delivering an impressive colorful clump after a few years. They can be mounted on virtually anything, giving you creative leeway to go nuts with wood, ceramics, sea shells and rocks.

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Stricta @tamanhatijz

Care Tips for Air Plants

Air plants are slowly taking over the indoor plant world and you do not want to be left behind! There are some pointers to remember when taking care of air plants.

Check out our article, Check out Your Ultimate Guide on How to Care for Air Plants, for an extensive look!

Watering Air Plants

Too much water will kill your little one. Some air plants do well with the occasional misting once a week, especially during cold seasons. During the summer, the dunk and dry method works the best. Soak the plant for 15 minutes then shake off the excess water before putting it back in its home.

Here’s our article dedicated to watering air plants, check it out!

Sunlight for Air Plants

Air plants are naturally found hanging on to tree branches. This shows they flourish with a bit of shade or in bright, filtered or indirect light. They do not like baking under the scorching sun.

5 Types of Air Plants
Beautiful air plant display @flowers.by.roxanne

Curious to try out one of these 5 types of air plants? We would love to hear about your adventures as well as answer any questions you may have! Already own air plants? Show us your photos in our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plants Lounge!

Ready to start your air plant collection? Let us help! Head over to Succulents Box, where you can sign up for monthly subscription boxes and get over 200 air plants and succulents delivered right to your door! Starting at just $5 a month, you can grow your air plant collections right from the comfort of your home! Click here to learn more and sign up today.

If you want to learn more about air plants, we have some additional articles to help! Air Plants vs Succulents, Everything You Need to Know About Air Plants, and 7 Rare Air Plants You Need in Your Home!

Head over to our Instagram and Pinterest accounts for daily succulent content!

Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complementary guide. 

Thanks for reading, happy planting! ?

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