The Best Succulents Box Review Guide For You

We love getting plants delivered! Our local nursery is a little slim on the succulent pickings, so plant subscription boxes, like Succulent Box, allow us to try out so many species we never would’ve gotten a chance to own.

We’re always super excited to receive our plants in the mail, and a little nervous. Succulents are pretty hard to ship. Their leaves are delicate and fragile, so they’re easily damaged in transit. The leaves can even fall off if the succulents aren’t properly packaged and get jostled around too much!

When we got our Succulent Box in the mail, we were relieved to discover that all of our plants were ok! Thanks to the ample padding in the box, none of our succulents were damaged.

Succulents Box Review
Just look at all those packing peanuts! Our succulents could not have been safer.

Time to Unwrap!

We carefully unwrapped all of our new succulents and were really impressed with how they looked.

Succulents Box Review
Plant family photo!

Would you be able to tell that these succulents were wrapped in bubble wrap just a few minutes ago? We wouldn’t—they don’t look misshapen at all!

We loved that every succulent came with a little identification card. It’s easy to figure out which genus your succulent belongs to, but it can be pretty hard to figure out the species and variety.

We definitely would’ve known that the succulent on the left in the photo above was an Echeveria, but we might not have figured out it was a Blue Elf. So we really appreciate the fact that these ID cards were included in the subscription box!

Succulents Box Review
Care instructions and a coupon code—sweet!

We also liked that the subscription box came with care instructions. It had some really helpful tips, like acclimate your succulent plants gradually to sunlight to keep them from burning and water them less during the winter. It had almost everything someone new to succulents would need to know to take great care of their plant babies!

Now let’s take a closer look at each plant that came in the box!

What’s Inside?

Our subscription box came with four succulent plants: one Echeveria, two Sedums and one Sempervivum.

A Succulent Box like this one with four plants only costs $20, so each succulent costs $5. Not bad, right?

We’d say this cute little Echeveria ‘Blue Elf’ is worth the price!

Succulents Box Review
Echeveria ‘Blue Elf’

And so is this Sedum ‘Firestorm’ below. The edges of its leaves turn a beautiful bright red color in the sun. You can already see that they’re starting to turn red, but we can’t wait until the colors get even more vibrant!

Succulents Box Review
Sedum ‘Firestorm’

Here’s one of the Sempervivums⁠—a beautiful Pachyphyllum plant. Look at those gorgeous fleshy green leaves!

Succulents Box Review
Sempervivum Pachyphyllum

Last but not least, here’s a closer look at the Sempervivum Calcareum.

Succulents Box Review
Sempervivum Calcareum

This succulent has a big, beautiful green rosette with a hint of maroon on the tips of its leaves! Isn’t it gorgeous?

Looks like it’s already sprouting a chick, too, so this succulent is basically two for the price of one!

Overall Consensus

Overall, we’re super happy with our Succulent Box! The plants look healthy and didn’t arrive with any kind of damage. We loved all the extra touches that the box came with, like the succulent identification cards and the care instructions. The bright blue packaging on the outside of the box was super cute too!

As you can see from the photos above, there’s a nice variety of succulents in this box. They’re pretty good size as well—the ones you’d get from a nursery wouldn’t be much bigger.

And who knows if a nursery near you would even have all of these unique succulents! We’ve personally never seen an Echeveria ‘Blue Elf’ at any of the garden centers near us.

Plus, going to the garden center is not nearly as fun as getting a subscription box in the mail. Having a succulent surprise delivered to our door and not knowing what was in it was so exciting!

 

Succulents Box Review

Full Succulents Box

Would you guys get a plant subscription box like Succulent Box? We’d definitely get one again, especially since they start at $5! We also love that their 200 varieties of succulents and air plants are organically grown in California, making them a quick- ship when ordering within the USA.

Ready to get your subscription box started? Head to this link to order yours! Let us know your thoughts and experiences in the comments section below or share in our Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge. We’re sure our fellow succulent lovers would love to hear from you!

Have your own succulent subscription box, or planters, or any succulent- related item you’d like for us to review? Contact us to inquire, we’d love more succulents for the office!

Before your new succulent babies deliver, make sure you check out our care guides so you’re fully prepared! Check out When You Should Water Your Succulents, How to Propagate Your Succulents Successfully, and Your Ultimate Guide on How to Care for Air Plants!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Have fun and happy planting! 🌱

How to Tell If Your Cactus is Dying

It’s been some time since you got that cactus. You’re doing all you can to make sure it thrives. Watering. Fertilizing. Sunlight exposure.

You name ’em!

But you haven’t seen a slightest change in quite some time. Is the little thingy really growing? How do you know you’re doing the right thing as far cacti care is concerned?

Worse still, is your cactus dying?

Maybe yes. Maybe no.

One thing with cactuses is that they take time (years) to show any considerable change in size – most of them. Even then, as the plants are growing, you have to be on the lookout for any signs of deviation from normal growth patterns.

This is how you tell your cactus is dying.

How to Tell if Your Cactus is Dying
@designs4seasons

Signs That Your Cactus is Dying

Discoloring cactus

A cactus plant will take on a tinge that is not naturally its own. Depending on where the problem is coming from, the change in color may start at the top end of stem segments or from the base the soil. Dying is guaranteed if rapid action is not taken.

Droopy leaves on cacti

Dying in the few leaf-bearing cacti (like epiphylum) is signaled by downward pointing leaves that lack vigor.

This gives the cactus plant a general unhealthy look (because it is, right?). It will also appear under watered even when you’ve excelled in quenching it.

How to Tell if Your Cactus is Dying
@lindastarguitar

Soft segments around your cactus

The change of colour above may be accompanied by squishy stem segments that appear swollen.

This also means they can break off easily with minimal force applied.

Try pulling a spine off. That’s a dying cactus if you manage to pull off the specialized leaves.

Instability in your cactus potting soil

You’ll know this if the plant has a lean. Not bent – just the whole plant leaning to a particular side. A dying cactus is shaky in its potting mix and may appear as though it’s about to fall off – well, it will definitely fall off if you moved it, for a severe case. A sign of lack of roots. Or the existing ones may be too weak to properly support the plant.

This is assuming you potted the plant just right.

How to Tell if Your Cactus is Dying
@plant_n_grow

Foul smells coming from your cactus plant

Now, that’s a really bad sign. A foul smell means a large part of the cactus is completely rotten and there is nothing you can do to save it.

In other words, it is no longer in the dying process, it’s actually deceased now. All you can really do now is dispose of your fighting cactus plant and obtain a new one whether it be from a purchase or from a friend.

How to Tell if Your Cactus is Dying
@plant_n_grow

Why is Your Cactus Dying?

Overwatering

The age-old sure way to kill a cactus is by treating it to frequent watering sprees. It may look like a sensible thing to do. Only that with a cactus, the more frequent it is getting water, the higher the chances of it dying. Make sure to check out our article on how often to water your cactus if you need a refresher.

This is so because the water is such a perfect condition for rot.

Inappropriate potting medium

If you didn’t get the memo – your regular potting soil is a no-go zone for a cactus. It just holds on to water for way longer than your plant would prefer.

So, even if you get the watering correct, the soil mix will pull you back a couple of steps. The long periods of dampness are a nice condition for rot. And before you know it, your plant is exhibiting signs of dying.

We highly recommend this soil mix by Bonsai Jack. It is one of the best soil mixes on the market. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, it helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. Go ahead and get the 7 Gallon Bag if you are plant nerd like us :). Pick up some of our favorite soil by clicking here: Bonsai Jack Succulent Soil.

Our Pick
Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil
$13.88

Our succulent potting soil helps prevent root rot and overwatering. It will not damage roots on cactus and succulents. Bonsai Jack succulent soil mix is used by professionals and hobbyists alike to enhance all sorts of succulent plants.

10/22/2020 03:38 am UTC

A wound becoming infected

It may have happened that a part of the stem broke off leaving an open patch.

Such a part is just what bacteria and some pests need to wreck havoc on your cactus. It is soft therefore making it an easy target for insects with munching tendencies. Bacterial infection may come about mainly in the cold weather or when the plant is not exposed to enough sunlight for the injured part to callous over time.

Such wounds cause the plant to start dying from top.

Wrong pot size

Getting the wrong size of a pot for your cactus is a sure way of kicking off its dying process. It could be too small or too large.

Small or large in this case will depend on the size of your cactus.

A pot that is smaller than your plant will choke up its roots as there is little breathing space. A larger than life pot on the other hand is bound to keep so much water sparking off rotting in both the roots and stem. Talk about a double tragedy… you’ll have to find the right balance that’s good for your specific cactus.

 

How to Tell if Your Cactus is Dying
@kelseyemstevens

How to Save a Dying Cactus

Whether or not your plant can be saved, depends on the extent of rot. For instance, as you’ve seen above, a foul smell emanating from your cactus is a sign that you’ve lost that plant.

But in cases where dying is just getting started, it’s possible to salvage the plant or part of it for propagation purposes.

If the rot is starting off at the top of the stem, cut away small pieces of it (the stem) as you move down to the base of the plant. You want to make sure the any rotten material is done away with for good. Only stop when you reach healthy tissue.

If the plant is taking a beating from the roots up, you’ll have to take the propagation route. Just as above, cut up the plant until you have only healthy tissue before you stop. Let the cut part dry and set it up in a well-draining mix.

How to Tell if Your Cactus is Dying
@designs4seasons

Also, make sure to check other aspects like the potting medium, the size of the pot and your watering. Make the following changes if you haven’t already:

  • Repot the plant remnant in a pot that fits it exactly, leaving just enough space for the soil mix. Also, remember to use a commercial cactus and succulent mix or create one by mixing regular potting soil with coarse sand and pumice.
  • Water only when the top part of the mix is dry.

Additionally, if pests and diseases were a part of the problem, apply the appropriate chemicals so as the remaining part of the plant is free from these past ghosts.

Now you’re in the know about dying cactus plants. The signs, reasons, handling and preventing. Time to check around your cacti collection and do the necessary.

ALSO READ:

 

How to Tell if Your Cactus is Dying
@lucyonthego1

Have you learned how to tell if your cactus is dying or not? Let us know what we missed out and we’ll be sure to include it in the article, we want to help as many cactus lovers as we can.

REMINDER: We have an ~exclusive~ Facebook succulent group where you can join in on fellow succulent- lovers’ conversations and post your own experiences & photos! Check it out now!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, good soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Thanks for reading and happy cacti planting! (:

How to Repot a Cactus Plant (Beginners Guide)

Repotting is an inevitable activity in the life of a cactus let alone any other succulent.

Due to the fact that it always growing (just as any plant), it is bound to overgrow its initial pot. And this necessitates a change for your cactus to keep glowing.

Typically between 2-4 years, your cacti require repotting, don’t you wish you had a new home this often?

Right below, you’ll learn about repotting a cactus (the right way) without killing your plant.

First off…

how to repot cactus plant
@cactus_of_ig

Requirements for Repotting Cacti

Repotting isn’t much different from the initial potting. Below is a recap of the requirements.

The right pot or planter

When it comes to choosing a pot for your cactus, the size and material are of utmost importance.

Usually, a pot made of clay like these terra cotta pots made from Riseuvo is preferred over a plastic one. The clay allows the roots to breath more easily which contributes to the general well-being of succulent plants.

Additionally, it boosts the drainage of the cacti potting mix hence providing just the ideal conditions for your cactus – scarce water.

On the size aspect, choose a pot that is neither too large or too small – depending on the size of the cactus you wish to pot. You want to make sure that there is just a bit of space between your cactus and the pot’s walls. A super small pot will choke up the roots ultimately killing the plant. A larger than life pot will lead to the soil mix retaining water, and you know that means for your cactus.

If you don’t know what excessive water does to cacti or let alone any succulent, please be sure to read our article on when you should water succulents. It’s helped over 3000 people and it may help you too.

Also, don’t forget to ensure your pot has a few holes down there. A big enough and well flowing draining system will be crucial to your cacti’s growth.

 

how to repot a cactus plant
@ihavenogarden

The proper potting mix

Cacti, being succulents, require a potting mix that is well-draining to provide the water scarcity condition that they’re adapted to. So your normal soil mix is a no-no. (If you’re looking for a premium cacti soil mix, here’s one we highly recommend from Superfly Bonsai).

Instead, you can grab a commercial succulent mix prepared just for your cactus. A typical cacti/succulent potting mix contains a small amount of organic materials, sand, perlite and sphagnum peat moss.

 

Alternatively, you can prepare your own ideal mix at home as long as you have the ingredients – and it’s not some endless collection of stuff from the outer space, although that’d be pretty cool. Check out the ingredients your cacti soil mix will need.

  • Potting soil
  • Coarse sand
  • Pumice (perlite is also a good option here)

And the procedure is straightforward – mix the above ingredients with potting soil taking up a larger share of the combination while the other two ingredients sharing the remaining part equally.

For instance, 2 parts of potting soil can be combined with 1 part of coarse sand and 1 part of pumice/perlite.

To test if you’ve indeed ended up with the real thing, wet your mixture and try squeezing it. A good one should be coarse and crumby. If not, consider adding more of sand and pumice/perlite. The coarseness and crumbiness (is that a word?) is what allows your succulent soil to have a functional draining system.

how to repot cactus plant
@thepricklybitch

Repoting a Cactus Plant

Here’s a refresher for when you first pot a cactus

In case you aren’t well informed on how to properly pot cacti in the beginning, here is a quick reminder on what you need to do. Just follow the steps below, skip to the next section if you just want to learn how you can be repotting your awesome prickly cactus.

  1. Place a well-draining material at the bottom of your pot. Gravel is fine.
  2. Fill up the pot with a well-draining mix – commercial or homemade – up to a third way of the pot.
  3. Try placing your plant in the pot. This way, you get to know if the pot’s size is ideal for it. The cactus shouldn’t be too deep into the pot nor too high up. And should leave just a bit of space between it and the pot – remember above? And, please don’t forget to watch for spikes. A pair of tongs or even cacti gloves will cover you.
  4. If all is good with the size, hold the plant centrally and fill up the remaining space with more potting mix.
  5. Firm the soil by pressing it gently. Add some more it goes down considerably but be sure to leave some watering space at the top.
  6. Give the plant its first shot of water.

Repotting a Cactus Plant

  1. Loosen up the soil in the pot by running a blunt knife or some other gardening tool in it. Be thorough at this to avert any possibilities of damaging the plant.
  2. Remove your cactus plant being careful not to come into contact with its pricks. In case the plant is quite huge, use a rolled up towel or actual gardening gloves.
  3. Rid the roots of large soil debris and see to it that you have individual roots separated from each other.
  4. Check the roots for any pests and diseases. Treat with appropriate chemicals. Also, nip off any dead ones.
  5. Prune the very large roots. Cutting these roots will help your plant grow with much more vigor.
  6. Allow the plant to dry out for up four days. This allows the roots that might have been hurt to heal hence eliminating any risk of rot in the soil.
  7. Follow the potting procedure above to install your plant in the ideal pot. But don’t water it yet. Give it up to a week before you water it.

After that, you can go back to your normal care routine.

 

how to repot cactus plant
@a_door_ph

Repotting your cactus plant is mandatory to maintain the ideal pot size. And as long as you’ve taken your plants through the above treatment, you should do so without a problem.

Thanks for reading our repotting a cactus plant article, we hope you learned something new today in order to avoid getting pricked by the spiky thorns on cacti. Let us know if you have any tips that we didn’t share below!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

 

BE SURE TO ALSO READ:

8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower; Different Types for Indoors/Outdoors

Do you want to add a tinge of amazingness in your succulent farm? Whether indoors or outdoors, having a beautiful botanic garden is a dream come true to all succulents lovers. That’s why you need succulents plants that flower. Succulents are exhilarating plants. They come in different shapes and sizes making a place look magical. The sight of them is breathtaking.

They not only attract humans but insects too, thus resulting in pollination. Succulents that flower come in different shades from pale green, to purple, and pink. To find out more about plants that flower, read on for the exclusive details.

1. Stapelia

Stapelia has different species. The plant was first discovered in South Africa. Sometimes it’s referred to as carrion flower. They have a strong scent resembling rotten meat. Unfortunately, this doesn’t attract humans but only insects. Instead of leaves, they possess thick spikes which are quite harmless. Also, their flowers are magnificent and attractive. Some of its species are red, while others have purplish tips.

Be sure to check out “5 Succulents with Red Flowers” for a list of plants of the red species.

8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower
Born in South Africa @flowers.cactus

2. Huernia

Huernia is closely related to stapelia and is also sometimes referred to as carrion flowers. Initially, it was cooked and used as food. Huernia has sharp-looking thorns but they are soft and won’t harm your skin. Since they don’t have leaves, they use their thick stems, which are pale green for photosynthesis. The red species has a foul smell that attracts insects for pollination. Lastly, they can survive in hostile conditions like extended periods of drought.

MAKE SURE TO ALSO READ:

8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower
Survival of The Fittest @succulentaerialyogi

3. Portulaca

Portulaca is a brightly colored succulent. The sight of this plant just screams life. It has fleshy stems, and the plants flowers come in different shades like lavender, pink, yellow red and even orange. Apart from being vibrant, you can easily maintain them, and they require little water for them to flourish. For the best results, you should plant them in shallow containers. They also thrive in rock gardens.

Portulaca has shallow spreading roots which help to prevent soil erosion. Additionally, it has numerous species, for instance; sun jewel which grows fast. “Magic Carpet” and “Sunkist” are annual species that cannot survive in winter.

Be sure to check out our guide on “How to Care for Succulents in the Winter” to see how you can take care of your succulents plants during the winter weather.

8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower
Flowers of Various Colors @georgualdoni

4. Epiphyllum

Epiphyllum is also known as orchid cactus. You can easily term it as ugly, pathetic, or disgusting before it blossoms. But when it does, you would definitely regret using nasty words on epiphyllum. What’s more enthralling about them is their dinner plate’s size like flowers. Behold! They are something out of this world. And, they possess different colors like white, bright red, purple, and palest cream, hot pink, and pale shell pink.

They start blooming around the end of September and the begging of the spring. But different varieties can be grown at different periods of the year. Lastly, this succulent can cross-breed easily, and their cuttings also grow easily.

8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower
Hideous and Horrible @blkgirl_plantstagram

5. Adenium

Adenium is an interesting succulent. You will automatically fall in love with it its woody stem, green leaves, and their hot pink flowers turning white towards the center. It comes in different varieties, but the most common one is adenium obesum. Adenium is delicate and requires lots of care. The type of soil in which they thrive and the amount of water they get is essential. You shouldn’t overwater, and you should plant them in soil that has good drainage.

The plant often loses its leaves during winter, and they need to be kept in cold or winter temperatures. During summer, they need to receive maximum sunlight, at least 6 hours of sunshine per day.

Learn to also take care of your succulents in low light environments, check out “7 Best Succulents for Low Light Environments” for more.

8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower
Fall in Love in Adenium @adenium_vladikavkaz

6. Bromeliads

Bromeliads are famous for their jawbreaking and colorful nature. Their flowers bloom when you least expect them. The leaves are long and slender with a solid green color. The plants can be a mystery, and it can take some time to unfold. Their leaves can be confused as flowers. What’s more surprising is that these leaves or bracts change their colors like a chameleon. Amazing, right?

Are your succulents changing colors? Check here to find out what it means

The actual flowers of that succulent which are tiny and purple are usually inside the cistern. Bromeliads can survive in dry conditions, as carry their water. Bromeliads are a must-have in your garden.

8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower
Color of Nature @pvplantguy

7. Christmas Cactus

Christmas cactus succulent is a beautiful gift for your loved one or a friend. It has flowers of a different shade of red, pink and purple, white or orange, which will make you warm up to them. Their colorful nature is excellent for your interior decor. Christmas cactus needs a lot of care to bloom from one year to the next. You need to water the plant sparingly. Too much water can destroy it. Also, you should avoid moving the plant from one location to the next as its buds and flowers are fragile.

Lastly, keep the plant slightly root-bound. Don’t worry; even if it doesn’t bloom as often as you love. That’s their nature.

8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower
You Can Call Christmas Cactus @hannahlockard

8. Ruby Ball

Tired of a dull office desk? Or you do want to make your table at home stunning? Then, a ruby ball succulent is the perfect match. Ruby ball is also called red cap cactus and has a colorful red top. This succulent lack chlorophyll hence the name albino plant. They don’t have any hair or spikes. You should place them in a place full of light as they love being exposed. Ruby ball has a variant of 15 different colors. Some of which are neon, yellow, purple, orange, pink, and red.

Be sure to learn all about the cacti species by checking out our piece “What Is Special About A Cactus?“.

8 Beautiful Succulents That Flower
Variant Color Ruby @photosbyamelinda

You need the right succulents that flowers to get your garden as colorful as you love. With the above types, you are good to go!

Thank you for reading! Did you enjoy reading this post? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “Rare Succulents You Wish You Knew About“. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy Planting! 🌵

5 Main Benefits of Succulents in Your Home

Everyone can see that succulents are beautiful and make amazing home decor. But that’s not all succulents are good for! There are so many other uses and benefits of succulents besides just looking pretty. They improve air quality, have lots of medicinal uses, can improve your concentration, and more.

Today, we’re going to cover five of the amazing benefits you’ll get from keeping succulents in your home. If you weren’t already a succulent collector, you will be after reading this post!

Succulents Improve Air Quality

Did you know that succulents can clean the air?

Succulents, like aloe and snake plants, are particularly good at removing toxins from the air. However, you’ll still benefit from keeping any succulent in your home as they will improve the air quality as well!

All plants have pores on their leaves that allow them to absorb gases in the air, including ones that aren’t good for you to breathe, like benzene and ammonia. So ditch that loud, noisy air purifier and get yourself some succulents!

Succulents also humidify the air, which improves the air quality in your home even more! They release water vapor through the pores in their leaves during photosynthesis, which puts a little extra moisture in the air and prevents it from getting too dry. Check out our more in-depth conversation about if succulents clean the air!

Dry indoor air can cause unpleasant symptoms, like sore throats and dry skin that nobody wants, so head to the garden center and pick up some more succulents today. They will enhance your home as well as give you health benefits! And you get to pick out cute little planters like these to put all your new succulents in!

Succulents Have Medicinal Properties

Succulents have been used throughout history to treat medical problems like cuts, burns, stomachaches, and more. Lots of them have medicinal properties, including aloe vera and yucca.

Several parts of aloe vera plants have medical benefits, including the juice and gel.

Aloe vera juice has become a pretty popular drink—you can get it at just about any health food store. It’s known to help reduce inflammation, especially in the digestive tract, so lots of people drink it to help with stomach problems.

Aloe vera gel has tons of benefits for the skin and is a common ingredient in body lotions and face creams. Rumor has it that Cleopatra applied it to her face daily to keep it looking supple and soft! That isn’t all. Check out our article about how this succulent helps treat eczema.

Historically, yucca was used to treat cuts and scratches, but now it’s also used as a treatment for arthritis. Yucca has saponins and other antioxidants that help reduce inflammation and ease joint pain. You can take yucca as a supplement, but we also like to cut it up and turn it into some delicious oven baked fries!

Succulents Improve Your Concentration

You already knew that keeping succulents on your desk can give you a boost of happiness at work, but did you know that it can improve your productivity and focus too?

That’s right! Two recent studies confirmed that keeping plants at your desk boosts your concentration so you can tackle your tasks faster.

The first study in 2011 had one group of people perform a reading task at a basic wooden desk with nothing on it, and a second group performs the same task at a desk with lots of plants around it. Unsurprisingly, the group surrounded by a bunch of pretty plants performed much better! A second study conducted in 2015 confirmed the findings, so you can definitely improve your concentration and attention just by keeping some beautiful succulents on your desk.

Your succulent habit will more than pay for itself because of that raise you’ll get at work for being super productive!

Excited to bring some succulents into your office? Check out these two articles to make sure your work environment is succulent- friendly— “Can Succulents Survive in My Work Environment” and “5 Office Succulents You Wish You Had at Work!”

Succulents Make a Tasty Snack

While we don’t recommend that you pick up a random succulent off your shelf and start munching on it, we do recommend that you check out a few different types of edible succulents, including sea beans, pineapple, yucca, and some species of cacti, like opuntia and saguaro! Aside from this list, check out an additional 6 edible succulents that will excite your tastebuds!

Sea beans are super good for you and are gaining popularity in the culinary world. They might be a little harder to get your hands on than the ordinary green beans you see in grocery stores, but it’s worth it to track some sea beans down!

They have a flavor and texture that’s similar to asparagus, but they’re a little bit saltier because they’re grown on salt marshes and beaches. You can eat them raw or pan fry them up and serve them alongside some fish for a quick, healthy meal. They’re rich in protein, calcium, iron, and iodine, so you’ll definitely get your daily dose of vitamins and minerals if you include this succulent in your diet!

You already know we love to make fries out of yucca, but you’re probably wondering what in the world could we benefit from with a cactus?! Well, we love to cut it up and make a salsa out of it. We love to throw a little bit of pineapple and a hot pepper like habanero into the salsa too.

It sounds a little weird, but trust us—it’s super tasty and has health benefits too! Salsa made with cactus has lots of vitamin C and fiber, plus it’s low in calories. Opuntia leaves only have 23 calories per cup, so it’s a much more diet-friendly taco topping than guacamole. That leaves you lots of extra calories for margaritas!

Speaking of tasty snacks, if you want unlimited grocery delivery straight to your door for only $14.99 from Amazon, click here to sign up! We have it for the office and it comes in handy quite often actually, our favorite snacks are these nut mixes right now!

Taking Care of Succulents Reduces Stress

Studies have shown that taking care of houseplants reduces stress. After a long day at work, coming home and tending to your plants can help reduce your blood pressure, calm you down, and recover from the stress of all the mental tasks you completed during the day.

Succulents aren’t fussy or hard to care for, so they might even reduce your stress more than other plants! For the most part, you won’t have to worry about killing them, especially if you follow all of the succulent care tips we show here. The main thing you should watch out for is overwatering, but besides that, caring for your succulents will be a breeze!

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Now that you know all of the benefits of having succulents in your home, are you going to buy a few (or a few more)? Let us know which types of succulents you’re going to adopt in the comments section below or share your stories in our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge!

To continue enhancing your succulent knowledge, check out these informative articles from Succulent City! Take a look at Are Succulents Poisonous?, Caring for Succulents in the Spring, and How Long Do Succulents Live?.

Did you enjoy reading this post? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting!

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