How to Repot a Cactus Plant (Beginners Guide)

Repotting is an inevitable activity in the life of a cactus let alone any other succulent.

Due to the fact that it is always growing (just as any plant), it is bound to overgrow the initial pot. And this necessitates a change for your cactus to keep glowing.

Typically between 2-4 years, your cacti require repotting, don’t you wish you had a new home this often?

Right below, you’ll learn about repotting a cactus (the right way) without killing your plant.

First off…

how to repot cactus plant
@cactus_of_ig

Requirements for Repotting Cacti

Repotting isn’t much different from the initial potting. Below is a recap of the requirements.

The right pot or planter

When it comes to choosing a pot for your cactus, the size and material are of utmost importance.

Usually, a pot made of clay like a terra cotta pot is preferred over a plastic one. The clay allows the roots to breath more easily which contributes to the general well-being of succulent plants.

Additionally, it boosts the drainage of the cacti potting mix hence providing just the ideal conditions for your cactus – scarce water.

On the size aspect, choose a pot that is neither too large or too small – depending on the size of the cactus you wish to pot. You want to make sure that there is just a bit of space between your cactus and the pot’s walls. A super small pot will choke up the roots ultimately killing the plant. A larger than life pot will lead to the soil mix retaining water, and you know that means for your cactus.

Also, don’t forget to ensure your pot has a few holes down there. A big enough and well flowing draining system will be crucial to your cacti’s growth.

 

how to repot a cactus plant
@ihavenogarden

The proper potting mix

Cacti, being succulents, require a potting mix that is well-draining to provide the water scarcity condition that they’re adapted to. So your normal soil mix is a no-no. (If you’re looking for a premium cacti soil mix, here’s one we highly recommend from Superfly Bonsai).

Instead, you can grab a commercial succulent mix prepared just for your cactus. A typical cacti/succulent potting mix contains a small amount of organic materials, sand, perlite and sphagnum peat moss.

 

Alternatively, you can prepare your own ideal mix at home as long as you have the ingredients – and it’s not some endless collection of stuff from the outer space, although that’d be pretty cool. Check out the ingredients your cacti soil mix will need.

  • Potting soil
  • Coarse sand
  • Pumice (perlite is also a good option here)

And the procedure is straightforward – mix the above ingredients with potting soil taking up a larger share of the combination while the other two ingredients sharing the remaining part equally.

For instance, 2 parts of potting soil can be combined with 1 part of coarse sand and 1 part of pumice/perlite.

To test if you’ve indeed ended up with the real thing, wet your mixture and try squeezing it. A good one should be coarse and crumby. If not, consider adding more of sand and pumice/perlite. The coarseness and crumbiness (is that a word?) is what allows your succulent soil to have a functional draining system.

how to repot cactus plant
@thepricklybitch

Repoting a Cactus Plant

Here’s a refresher for when you first pot a cactus

In case you aren’t well informed on how to properly pot cacti in the beginning, here is a quick reminder on what you need to do. Just follow the steps below, skip to the next section if you just want to learn how you can be repotting your awesome prickly cactus.

  1. Place a well-draining material at the bottom of your pot. Gravel is fine.
  2. Fill up the pot with a well-draining mix – commercial or homemade – up to a third way of the pot.
  3. Try placing your plant in the pot. This way, you get to know if the pot’s size is ideal for it. The cactus shouldn’t be too deep into the pot nor too high up. And should leave just a bit of space between it and the pot – remember above? And, please don’t forget to watch for spikes. A pair of tongs or even cacti gloves will cover you.
  4. If all is good with the size, hold the plant centrally and fill up the remaining space with more potting mix.
  5. Firm the soil by pressing it gently. Add some more it goes down considerably but be sure to leave some watering space at the top.
  6. Give the plant its first shot of water.

Repotting a Cactus Plant

  1. Loosen up the soil in the pot by running a blunt knife or some other gardening tool in it. Be thorough at this to avert any possibilities of damaging the plant.
  2. Remove your cactus plant being careful not to come into contact with its pricks. In case the plant is quite huge, use a rolled up towel or actual gardening gloves.
  3. Rid the roots of large soil debris and see to it that you have individual roots separated from each other.
  4. Check the roots for any pests and diseases. Treat with appropriate chemicals. Also, nip off any dead ones.
  5. Prune the very large roots. Cutting these roots will help your plant grow with much more vigor.
  6. Allow the plant to dry out for up four days. This allows the roots that might have been hurt to heal hence eliminating any risk of rot in the soil.
  7. Follow the potting procedure above to install your plant in the ideal pot. But don’t water it yet. Give it up to a week before you water it.

After that, you can go back to your normal care routine.

 

how to repot cactus plant
@a_door_ph

Repotting your cactus plant is mandatory to maintain the ideal pot size. And as long as you’ve taken your plants through the above treatment, you should do so without a problem.

Thanks for reading our repotting a cactus plant article, we hope you learned something new today in order to avoid getting pricked by the spiky thorns on cacti. Let us know if you have any tips that we didn’t share below!


BE SURE TO ALSO READ:


 

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

How to Make a Succulent Corsage

Ah, corsages. Just thinking about them brings us right back to our high school prom! (Anyone have an embarrassing story they want to share?) But that’s not the only thing they’re good for. Mothers of the bride and groom often wear them at weddings, and they’re a nice touch if you’re going to a fancy event like a gala.

And they’re pretty!

But let’s face it… those traditional rose and baby’s breath corsages are kind of outdated. Florists put baby’s breath in pretty much every arrangement in the 1990s, so any corsage with baby’s breath in it screams vintage, and not in the cool way!

Corsages are easily updated by putting trendy flowers and plants in them, though. And what’s trendier than succulents?

If you want to learn how to make a succulent corsage that will be the envy of all your friends, then keep on reading!

How to Make a Succulent Corsage
@theseatedsucculent

Materials You Need for a Succulent Corsage

To make a succulent corsage, you’ll need:

  • a corsage bracelet
  • plus satin ribbon
  • floral wire to make a bow
Floristrywarehouse Snap/Wrap Wristlet Corsage Bracelet Silver 1...
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Floristrywarehouse Snap/Wrap Wristlet Corsage Bracelet Silver 1...
Floristrywarehouse Snap/Wrap Wristlet Corsage Bracelet Silver 1...
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Star Quality 1/2 Inch Double face Satin Ribbon 100Yard |...
Star Quality 1/2 Inch Double face Satin Ribbon 100Yard |...
$12.49
OASIS Floral Products 24 Gauge Oasis Floral Wire - Pack of 300...
OASIS Floral Products 24 Gauge Oasis Floral Wire - Pack of 300...
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$16.78

Last update on 2020-10-25 / Amazon

If you’re not the craftiest person, like us, we found these large and small readymade pull bows— a great alternative instead of making our own. All you have to do is pull some strings and the bow will form itself! They come in all different sizes and colors, so you’ll be able to find one that fits your wrist and matches your dress.

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You’ll also need your favorite succulents, air plants or flowers to put on the corsage. We like to take one succulent cutting that’s bigger than all the others and make it the focal point of the corsage. Echeverias and Hens and Chicks are great for this because they have beautiful, colorful rosettes that look a lot like flowers!

For the smaller cuttings, we like to use Jade or Jelly Bean succulents because they have interesting leaf shapes and textures. Small flowers like Forget-Me-Nots also look great alongside succulent cuttings!

To secure all of these cuttings to the bracelet, you’ll need floral glue. You’ll also need some sharp scissors for this project.

Our Pick
E6000 Craft Adhesive
$11.95

Industrial strength craft adhesive that's ideal for bonding wood, fabric, leather, ceramic, glass, and metal.


10/25/2020 08:39 am UTC
How to Make a Succulent Corsage
@besserina

Methodology Behind Making a Succulent Corsage

Before you begin, grab your corsage bracelet and lay it on a flat surface. If you’re making your own bow, get out the satin ribbon, floral wire, and your pair of scissors.

Making the Bow

To make the bow, cut a long string of ribbon off of the spool. You’ll form the bow by looping and twisting the ribbon, just like the woman does in the below video. Once you’ve formed the ribbon, you’ll secure it with some of the floral wire.

If you’re using a pull bow, get it ready by pulling the strings. If you need a little help, here’s a great video tutorial!

Next, you’re going to want to secure the bow to the corsage bracelet. Put a dab of floral glue in the center of the floral bracelet and on the bow you just made. Wait a couple of seconds for the glue to get tacky and then secure the bow to the bracelet.

Now grab your scissors and cut the loop in the center of the bow. This is where your main succulent or flower will go.

Attaching Your Succulents

How to Make a Succulent Corsage
@sugarssuccs

Grab the plant or flower cutting you’re using and put a dab of floral glue on the back. Put a little glue on the bow too to ensure that it sticks. Wait for the glue to get a little tacky and place the cutting on the bow, applying a little pressure to make sure it sticks.

Now you’ll want to take some small cuttings from your plants and attach them to the bow. Apply glue and tuck them in wherever you think they’ll look good. There’s no right or wrong way to place your plants!

If you want to get a little fancy, you can also add rhinestones or pearls to your corsage. You can attach them with a dab of floral glue. They’ll add a little extra glamour and elegance to your succulent corsage!

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You’re all done! Now all that’s left to do is leave the corsage out to dry for a little while. After it’s done drying, stick it in the fridgeit’ll stay fresh in there for about a week.

When you’re ready to wear it, adjust the succulent corsage bracelet to fit your wrist and show it off to all your friends!

ALSO READ:

How to Make a Succulent Corsage
@besserina

Now that you know how to make a succulent corsage, are you going to try it? Let us know in the comments section below and post your creation to ur exclusive succulent- loving Facebook group!

For some inspiration, check out our Pinterest to help find the perfect succulents for your corsage. If you’ve made one already, please let us know too! We’d love to see them. Before you go, if you want a FREE 30 day trial to Amazon Prime, feel free to sign up here. Our team member just notified the entire team not too long ago that we partnered with Amazon for this!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Happy crafting & happy planting! ?

The Best Cactus Gloves for Your Garden Activities

Gardening is all fun and games until you have to come close to a sharp-edged cactus. Whether you are outlining your perimeter with the Mexican fence post or transplanting your recently purchased Beavertail cactus, you need to be careful with these sometimes-spiky green guys.

The right cactus handling gloves are essential to protect your hands from scratches, pricks, and cuts. Some cactus have a poisonous sap that can irritate the skin while others have tiny hair-like features called glochids that have been known to create a love-hate relationship with green thumbs.

When looking for durability, flexibility, and comfort, we have narrowed down these three cactus gloves that will make gardening activities with our sharp-edged friends more tolerable.

 

HexArmor ThornArmor 3092 Thorn Resistant Gloves

Designed to be the first, high-end cactus landscaping glove, the ThornArmor 3092 Thorn Resistant Gloves lives up to its name. The glove’s parent company HexArmor is known for being the industry leader in protective gear against needles and thorns. The ThornArmor Glove puts innovative technology to the test by offering landscape contractors, hobbyists, and DIY gardeners the ultimate, hassle-free solution for handling cactus.

The palm lining on these gloves is padded by a three-layer SuperFabric that has been tried and tested against needles and thorns. They have an added Coated Palm Grip protection on the palm side, and the index fingertips are reinforced with a wrap, certifying the gloves as remarkably puncture resistant. The back-of-hand is made out of flexible spandex and has a breathable HexVent panel to keep you cool. The gloves have a good grip, are easy to clean, and have a Velcro closure on the Airprene cuff to keep debris out.

The ThornArmor 3092 boasts as one of the most durable gloves for heavy-duty gardening, and rightfully so. It comes highly recommended with ANSI/ISEA level A9 cut resistance (on an A1 – A9 scale) and level 3 puncture protection (on a 1 – 5 scale) endorsements.

Our Pick
ThornArmor Heavy Duty Landscaping Gloves
$41.49

ThornArmor puncture-resistant gloves are perfect for tough yard work and feature a TP-X outer palm to improve grip and allow dirt to be easily brushed off.

10/25/2020 11:36 am UTC

 

Legacy Gardens Leather Gloves

Would you like to hug your Golden Barrel cactus? For a needle free gardening experience, you can’t go wrong with the Legacy Gardens Leather gloves. They are made from genuine, A-Grade goatskin leather, the most puncture-resistant and sturdiest kind of leather. This heavy-duty glove is devised to be dependable against pokes, scrapes, and cuts, while at the same time, remaining soft and flexible on the skin.

The gauntlet sleeve’s design protects your arms and elbows from bristles, especially when pruning a cacti garden of different shapes, thorns, and thistles. The gloves have an elastic wrist band that holds the glove in place and helps the sleeve stay in position on your arm.

Legacy Gardens gloves have been fitted with extra padding and double stitching, meaning they are meant to last a cacti lifetime. These puncture-proof garden work gloves are available in men and women’s sizes.

 

ALSO READ:

 

GoldiFlora Cactus Gloves

After years of research and development, the German-based house and garden products company called GoldiFlora introduced its cactus gloves. Created from soft yet very stable plastic, the cactus gripping gloves guarantee an injury-free experience when repotting your cacti.

These special gloves can be worn like oven mitts. They have a slot to slide your hand into while the palm side is fitted with 3 cm long bristles that ensure optimal interlocking with the spines of the cacti. The spines allow you to handle your cactus without hurting the plant or yourself gently.

The gloves have been hailed as an indispensable cactus tool by renowned international garden magazines. GoldiFlora’s cactus gloves will effectively handle the spines and hairs of a bulky Old Lady Cactus and, at the same time, will be gentle on a 6-inch Ladyfinger Cactus.

 

Stay Safe When Working Your Green Thumb

Remember to be gentle when handling cacti. Applying too much pressure can bruise your plant and will increase the chances of getting pricked.

Silicone tongs are perfect to handle cactus with fine glochids like the Bunny Ear Cactus. This is because you can avoid the sharp bristles grazing your skin and move your plant without damaging it.

For extra protection, you can wrap a towel or newspaper around a large cactus, creating a barrier between your hand and the spines and use it as a handle to relocate your plant to where you want it.


If you have anything to add about good cactus gloves for protection, send us a comment! If you want to add to the conversation, find answers, and get tips, join and like our exclusive Facebook Group, Succulent City Plant Lounge! 

Also, be sure to keep an eye on our Succulent City Youtube channel! We are organizing to release some great quality videos to help all succulent parents have plants that thrive. Be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss out on new videos.

Happy growing friends! 💚

 

8 Best Indoor Cacti You Need to Have

Mini succulents and other conventional houseplants are in for a big competition. Cacti décor designs are springing up from every corner of the internet and boy, don’t they just look gorgeous!

Taming these desert survivors may seem hard, but not to cacti connoisseurs. Nothing beats the unique rustic look exuded by cacti. With their spiny texture and varied shapes, you’d be forgiven to think they’re living sculptures.

And no, they don’t need to be watched closely. Cacti actually thrive on neglect. (Yes, deprive them and they’ll still grow). Love them too much and you’ll soon be burying lots of them.

This is good news to beginner gardeners, busy plant lovers or brown thumbs who are looking for some bragging rights. Whichever category you fall into, cacti got you covered, talk about independence! If you’re a brown thumb, be sure to join our Succulent Plant Lounge, a lot of the members here converse and help each other out, it’s a great community to be in for succulents.

Sold on getting one of these alien-looking plants for your living room? Picking just any variety for your indoor needs may not be a good idea. Certain cacti varieties are just not meant to be tamed. Be that as it may, there are cacti species that thrive indoors and may even reward you with spectacular blooms.

Ready to explore? Let’s do this!

Bishop’s Cap— Astrophytum Myriostigma

Native to the Chihuahuan desert of Mexico, the Bishop’s Cap cacti is the most popular species in the genus Astrophytum. Its appearance resembles a star-shaped globe with equally divided segments. This hardy plant is usually green in color while young but as it matures, it’s covered by a grayish coating of fine scales to protect it from sunburn.

Tiny spines are lined on the ribs that separate the plant’s segments giving it a distinctive look. Take good care of it and it’ll give you brilliant yellow blooms during spring. Feeding it some fertilizer from time to time will do just that, any highly rated fertilizer for cacti like this will work just fine.

These dainty flowers appear at the center top of the plant where the ridges that separate the different segments converge.

Also known as the Monk’s Hood, taking care of the Bishop’s Cap is an easy ride. They can thrive in light shade but require sunlight for at least three hours a day. They can do well in a window sill on a south or west-facing window. Subject them to plenty of sun if you want to see the blooms.

We think a great window sill planter like this modern white one will look wonderful with the Bishop’s Cap cactus.

Astrophytum myriostigma prefers quick-draining soil so avoid your regular gardening mix. Water infrequently as too much water will lead to an early grave. You may feed them diluted fertilizer once a month during their growing season. Propagation is mainly done through seeds.

Barrel Cactus— Ferrocactus Species

Arrayed with ferocious spines, this quirky cactus makes a perfect complement to your existing interiorscape. As the name suggests, the barrel cactus is spherical with long spines on its ribs. The spikes act as protection to the juicy, edible pulp located on the inside.

The barrel cactus has a long life span and may live for a couple of decades. Its size varies depending on the species. Some are squat while others may be as tall as 10 feet. (Now that’s one tall and spiky plant!)

This cactus is a true sun lover and prefers full sun for a few hours a day. Setting it beside a large uncovered window will ensure it gets plenty of sun for optimum growth. Water sparingly, and do so after the soil has completely dried out. Use commercial cacti mix to prevent damp soil-related problems like root rot and fungi.

If you find yourself in a situation where you have to handle the barrel cactus with your bare hands, don’t. Be safe with cut resistant gloves so that the sharp spines won’t make a dent in your flesh.

Old Lady Cactus— Mammilaria Hahniana

Old Lady Cactus Mammilaria Hahniana
@succulents_4ever

Native to the Guanajuato state of Mexico, this cactus is tall growing reaching a height of 10 inches. Mammilaria hahniana is commonly referred to as the old lady cactus due to its white hair covering on the entire plant. The white hairs and spine also serve to protect the plant from the intense sun.

The old lady cactus blooms in spring and summer producing attractive purple flowers that may even grow in a ring on the plant’s apex.

Use well-draining cacti mix while potting this plant as they hate sitting in damp soil. Water once a week during the hot season and once a month during winter. Mammilaria hahniana will readily bloom in bright sunlight.

Learn more about this succulent here!

Angel Wings Cactus— Opuntia Albispina

Also known as bunny ears, the angel wings cactus is a desert denizen, highly adapted to small amounts of water and extensive heat. It has a striking appearance with its flat pads endowed with glochids –a fancy term for the white prickles you see on its surface.

Unlike most cacti, it lacks spines as these are replaced with clusters of hair on the surface of the pads. Careful though, these glochids can still injure you so take care while handling it.

Opuntia albispina is a summer bloomer producing creamy yellow flowers with globular edible fruits that are purple in color. Provide it with lots of light, quick-draining soil, and infrequent watering and you’ll have one happy angel wing cactus.

Christmas Cactus— Schlumbergera Bridgessii

Well, if you can’t pronounce the complex scientific name, don’t worry. You can also call it the thanksgiving cactus. Unlike most cacti, the Christmas cactus is spineless, characterized by its serrated green leaves.

This Brazilian cactus blooms in winter, producing showy tubular flowers in shades of purple, pink, red, and pink.

Keep your Christmas cactus in shaded light with a few hours in direct bright sunlight. Exposing this attractive indoor cactus in the hot sun will lead to sunburn. This plant is native to the tropical forests of Brazil and so it needs more water than other cacti. Thus, water frequently during its growing seasons but be careful to let the water drain out. If you’re wondering, propagation is also possible via cuttings.

Learn more about the beautiful Christmas cactus here.

Saguaro Cactus— Carnegiea Gigantean

Native to the Sonoran Desert of Mexico, the Saguaro cactus is a slow-growing and long-lived plant that can live up to two centuries. Its scientific name, Carnegiea Gigantean means gigantic candle. And quite rightly so! This cactus can grow up to 40 feet in height.

Saguaros are barrel-shaped with water storing capacity in the external pleats. It is hard on blooming and may take over 35 years for flowers to appear.

Carnegiea prefers bright sunlight. Water only once a month and cut back on watering during winter and other cool seasons. Let the soil be grainy and quickly draining for optimum growth.

Rat Tail Cactus— Aporocactus Flagelliformis

Can you throw a guess of the native home of this beauty? That’s right! The magnificent Mexico –home to almost all cacti.

If rats annoy you, well hopefully not this quirky rat tail cactus. With its trailing stems covered with fine spines, it’s definitely the perfect plant to set up on a hanging basket. The rat tail cactus thrives on bright sunlight and if everything goes well, they may bloom in spring bringing forth spectacular pink flowers.

Water as you would any cactus, making sure not to overwater the plant. A well-draining commercial cacti mix is recommended to prevent root rot. You can share the rat tail cactus with friends through cuttings. More the merrier! If you have some to give away, why not lend some to our members at Succulent Plant Lounge?

Be sure to check out “The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know

Star Cactus— Astrophytum Asteria

It’s a short, plump and round plant with approximately eight ribs each arrayed with woolly areoles. Also known as the sand dollar cactus or sea urchin cactus, Astrophytum asteria is generally green in color covered with decorative white dots.

When conditions are right, the star cactus blooms during spring, producing alluring yellow flowers having orange shades at the center. The fruits are pink, gray, or reddish, with woolly hair covering them.

Taking care of Astrophytum asteria is quite a breeze. Use grainy cacti mix that’s well-draining and water them twice a month. Ensure the soil dries out completely before in between watering. These sun lovers prefer bright light so get them the south or west-facing window for healthy growth.

If you’re looking for a more in-depth guide of this fantastic cactus, check this out!

ALSO READ:


Have enough of the cacti yet? If you get any particular cactus please let us know and if you want us to write a full in-depth article on how to take care of one of these cacti, don’t be afraid to comment it below.

Succulent City is here to help!

Did you enjoy reading this article? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

5 Main Benefits of Succulents in Your Home

Everyone can see that succulents are beautiful and make amazing home decor. But that’s not all succulents are good for! There are so many other uses and benefits of succulents besides just looking pretty. They improve air quality, have lots of medicinal uses, can improve your concentration, and more. 

Today, we’re going to cover five of the amazing benefits you’ll get from keeping succulents in your home. If you weren’t already a succulent collector, you will be after reading this post!

Succulents Improve Air Quality

Did you know that succulents can clean the air?

Succulents, like aloe and snake plants, are particularly good at removing toxins from the air. However, you’ll still benefit from keeping any succulent in your home as they will improve the air quality as well!

All plants have pores on their leaves that allow them to absorb gases in the air, including ones that aren’t good for you to breathe, like benzene and ammonia. So ditch that loud, noisy air purifier and get yourself some succulents!

Succulents also humidify the air, which improves the air quality in your home even more! They release water vapor through the pores in their leaves during photosynthesis, which puts a little extra moisture in the air and prevents it from getting too dry. Check out our more in-depth conversation about if succulents clean the air!

Dry indoor air can cause unpleasant symptoms, like sore throats and dry skin that nobody wants, so head to the garden center and pick up some more succulents today. They will enhance your home as well as give you health benefits! And you get to pick out cute little planters like these to put all your new succulents in!

Succulents Have Medicinal Properties

Succulents have been used throughout history to treat medical problems like cuts, burns, stomachaches, and more. Lots of them have medicinal properties, including aloe vera and yucca.

Several parts of aloe vera plants have medical benefits, including the juice and gel.

Aloe vera juice has become a pretty popular drink—you can get it at just about any health food store. It’s known to help reduce inflammation, especially in the digestive tract, so lots of people drink it to help with stomach problems.

Aloe vera gel has tons of benefits for the skin and is a common ingredient in body lotions and face creams. Rumor has it that Cleopatra applied it to her face daily to keep it looking supple and soft! That isn’t all. Check out our article about how this succulent helps treat eczema.

Historically, yucca was used to treat cuts and scratches, but now it’s also used as a treatment for arthritis. Yucca has saponins and other antioxidants that help reduce inflammation and ease joint pain. You can take yucca as a supplement, but we also like to cut it up and turn it into some delicious oven baked fries!

Succulents Improve Your Concentration

You already knew that keeping succulents on your desk can give you a boost of happiness at work, but did you know that it can improve your productivity and focus too?

That’s right! Two recent studies confirmed that keeping plants at your desk boosts your concentration so you can tackle your tasks faster.

The first study in 2011 had one group of people perform a reading task at a basic wooden desk with nothing on it, and a second group performs the same task at a desk with lots of plants around it. Unsurprisingly, the group surrounded by a bunch of pretty plants performed much better! A second study conducted in 2015 confirmed the findings, so you can definitely improve your concentration and attention just by keeping some beautiful succulents on your desk.

Your succulent habit will more than pay for itself because of that raise you’ll get at work for being super productive!

Excited to bring some succulents into your office? Check out these two articles to make sure your work environment is succulent- friendly— “Can Succulents Survive in My Work Environment” and “5 Office Succulents You Wish You Had at Work!”

Succulents Make a Tasty Snack

While we don’t recommend that you pick up a random succulent off your shelf and start munching on it, we do recommend that you check out a few different types of edible succulents, including sea beans, pineapple, yucca, and some species of cacti, like opuntia and saguaro! Aside from this list, check out an additional 6 edible succulents that will excite your tastebuds!

Sea beans are super good for you and are gaining popularity in the culinary world. They might be a little harder to get your hands on than the ordinary green beans you see in grocery stores, but it’s worth it to track some sea beans down!

They have a flavor and texture that’s similar to asparagus, but they’re a little bit saltier because they’re grown on salt marshes and beaches. You can eat them raw or pan fry them up and serve them alongside some fish for a quick, healthy meal. They’re rich in protein, calcium, iron, and iodine, so you’ll definitely get your daily dose of vitamins and minerals if you include this succulent in your diet!

You already know we love to make fries out of yucca, but you’re probably wondering what in the world could we benefit from with a cactus?! Well, we love to cut it up and make a salsa out of it. We love to throw a little bit of pineapple and a hot pepper like habanero into the salsa too.

It sounds a little weird, but trust us—it’s super tasty and has health benefits too! Salsa made with cactus has lots of vitamin C and fiber, plus it’s low in calories. Opuntia leaves only have 23 calories per cup, so it’s a much more diet-friendly taco topping than guacamole. That leaves you lots of extra calories for margaritas!

Speaking of tasty snacks, if you want unlimited grocery delivery straight to your door for only $14.99 from Amazon, click here to sign up! We have it for the office and it comes in handy quite often actually, our favorite snacks are these nut mixes right now!

Taking Care of Succulents Reduces Stress

Studies have shown that taking care of houseplants reduces stress. After a long day at work, coming home and tending to your plants can help reduce your blood pressure, calm you down, and recover from the stress of all the mental tasks you completed during the day.

Succulents aren’t fussy or hard to care for, so they might even reduce your stress more than other plants! For the most part, you won’t have to worry about killing them, especially if you follow all of the succulent care tips we show here. The main thing you should watch out for is overwatering, but besides that, caring for your succulents will be a breeze!

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Now that you know all of the benefits of having succulents in your home, are you going to buy a few (or a few more)? Let us know which types of succulents you’re going to adopt in the comments section below or share your stories in our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge!

To continue enhancing your succulent knowledge, check out these informative articles from Succulent City! Take a look at Are Succulents Poisonous?, Caring for Succulents in the Spring, and How Long Do Succulents Live?.

Did you enjoy reading this post? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting!

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