Rhipsalis Cereuscula

Rhipsalis Cereuscula-SC
IG@workhardplanthard

Introduction

Rhipsalis Cereuscula is a hanging cactus, also called a coral cactus. It is a perennial plant that lives for several years; it can also reach about 50 centimeters; This plant is from South American countries. It is made up of cylindrical stems that grow leaning on other plants, but not parasitically, only using these as support, and blooms producing white flowers gathered in clusters.

This plant needs a location with soil that can filter well to prevent water and moisture from accumulating. If kept indoors, it can withstand relatively high temperatures during the summer months.

The plant is tropical and usually grows in bright areas but not in direct sunlight.

Direct sunlight exposes the plant very slowly. We should not place it in a place too close to a window as it can suffer burns from the Sun, but it must be sufficiently illuminated. If kept in the garden, it is advisable to move it to more shady places during heat waves or high temperatures.

When planting it in a pot, we must fill it with some orchid compound, made up mostly of bark pieces, and it is essential to choose a vase with holes in its base, to allow the water to drain effectively. If you want to plant directly in the garden, we must make a hole and fill it with the same orchid compound, always caring that the soil has good drainage to drown our Rhipsalis Cereuscula.

Rhipsalis Cereuscula-SC
Image: IG@la_plantguy

Watering for the Plant


Hanging cacti require moderate watering, being ideal for watering it every day, or even two days, in between, since if it is watered daily or when the soil is still wet, it is possible that it suffers from excess water.

The soil or compost allowed to dry out completely and should be watered 3-4 times a week. During colder times, it should only be necessary to water it 1-2 times a week. Something advisable is to keep the irrigation limited to the rains, of course, if you live in a warm area with frequent showers.

If a rainy season begins, it is advisable to move it not to develop excess water. The irrigation frequency is necessary only when the soil dries completely, if plant kept indoors.

We must always avoid wetting its leaves directly when watering it, and if the pot has a plate underneath, we must often remove all excess water to prevent our plant from rotting.

Fertilization

So that our Rhipsalis Cereuscula can grow correctly and healthily, we must fertilize it approximately once a month from early spring to late summer. We can use a liquid or granulated fertilizer, being imperative to follow all the indications to the letter, since when using fertilizers, there is the risk of causing an overdose by burning the roots and killing our little cactus.

It is possible to multiply our Rhipsalis Cereuscula through seeds or cuttings during the spring or early summer. If you want to use seedlings, we must sow them in pots that are quite wide; they must be filled with some orchid compound and moistened, the seeds are planted trying to leave a good separation between them; finally, they are covered with a little more compound. Let them germinate, somewhere where they are kept at a warm temperature, for about two weeks. Another faster and easier way to multiply it is using cuttings. To do this, we must cut a branch of the plant, let it dry for a few days, plant it in soil or composed of orchids, water it, and voila, a new Rhipsalis Cereuscula will soon begin to grow.

Rhipsalis Cereuscula-Fertilization-SC
Fertilizing Cacti: IG@karinnazarate

Growth of Plant

The plant tends to grow a lot. Therefore it may be necessary to transplant it rather than keeping in small pots. The Rhipsalis Cereuscula generates very few roots in a shallow way; these should not be difficult to manipulate at transplantation. An ideal time to do this is during their growing season in spring or early summer. To do this, we have to remove the cactus, carefully clean its roots and place it in the new pot, taking care not to hurt its roots.

During the spring, once the cactus is mature, it will begin to produce some sporadic spines on its upper stems, these spines do not last long on the plant and tend to fall off on their own. It also makes some relatively small white flowers, which only last a few days on the plant. They grow on the lateral parts of the highest branches and are quite cute. After they wilt, the cactus develops whitish fruits that remain on the cactus for several weeks. Pruning is also beneficial for Rhipsalis Cereuscula, and this can help it grow and gain volume. After winter, it is usually ideal for carrying out these since the plant usually enters its growth stage healthily and regularly once the end and spring of the low temperature begin.

Rhipsalis Cereuscula-Growth of Plant-SC
Image: Reddit@u/mottephobic

Conclusion

Rhipsalis Cereuscula-Conclusion-SC
IG@summersun_5

These plants are quite resistant in general; they only have a particular weakness for cold, humid climates and low temperatures. Being native of tropical climates, we must keep this plant in a temperate and warm environment to avoid damage by low temperatures. As for pests, this plant is also resistant to many problems. But we have to protect it from animals such as snails and slugs. Lack of proper care will make you suffer from infestation. Something that usually attracts these pests is root rots resulting from too constant watering.

Rhipsalis Cereuscula is an ideal plant to grow indoors in hot and humid climates, thanks to the fact that its buds can hang out over time, it does not become too bulky, and it can be easily located inside the home. It is a cactus that is relatively easy to care for and multiply.

We only have to be careful in the cold and winter seasons, due to its tropical origin, this cactus is not resistant to these environments and can even die if exposed to it for too long. In these seasons, we must keep our cactus in a dry and warm place inside the house, trying to give it as much indirect sunlight as possible during the day.

How to Make a Succulent Corsage

How to make succulent corsage

Ah, corsages. Just thinking about them brings us right back to our high school prom! (Anyone have an embarrassing story they want to share?) But that’s not the only thing they’re good for. Mothers of the bride and groom often wear them at weddings, and they’re a nice touch if you’re going to a fancy event like a gala.

And they’re pretty!

But let’s face it… those traditional rose and baby’s breath corsages are kind of outdated. Florists put baby’s breath in pretty much every arrangement in the 1990s, so any corsage with baby’s breath in it screams vintage, and not in the cool way!

Corsages are easily updated by putting trendy flowers and plants in them, though. And what’s trendier than succulents?

If you want to learn how to make a succulent corsage that will be the envy of all your friends, then keep on reading!

How to Make a Succulent Corsage
@theseatedsucculent

Materials You Need for a Succulent Corsage

To make a succulent corsage, you’ll need:

  • a corsage bracelet
  • plus satin ribbon
  • floral wire to make a bow
Floristrywarehouse Snap/Wrap Wristlet Corsage Bracelet Silver 1...
Star Quality 1/2 Inch Double face Satin Ribbon 100Yard |...
OASIS Floral Products 24 Gauge Oasis Floral Wire - Pack of 300...
Floristrywarehouse Snap/Wrap Wristlet Corsage Bracelet Silver 1...
Star Quality 1/2 Inch Double face Satin Ribbon 100Yard |...
OASIS Floral Products 24 Gauge Oasis Floral Wire - Pack of 300...
-
-
$8.99
$12.49
$14.30
Floristrywarehouse Snap/Wrap Wristlet Corsage Bracelet Silver 1...
Floristrywarehouse Snap/Wrap Wristlet Corsage Bracelet Silver 1...
-
$8.99
Star Quality 1/2 Inch Double face Satin Ribbon 100Yard |...
Star Quality 1/2 Inch Double face Satin Ribbon 100Yard |...
$12.49
OASIS Floral Products 24 Gauge Oasis Floral Wire - Pack of 300...
OASIS Floral Products 24 Gauge Oasis Floral Wire - Pack of 300...
-
$14.30

Last update on 2021-04-20 / Amazon

If you’re not the craftiest person, like us, we found these large and small readymade pull bows— a great alternative instead of making our own. All you have to do is pull some strings and the bow will form itself! They come in all different sizes and colors, so you’ll be able to find one that fits your wrist and matches your dress.

String Bows, Basket Pull Bows, MeetRade 4’in 50PACK Elegant...
Auch 24pcs Pull Bows Christmas Gift Basket Knot with Ribbon...
String Bows, Basket Pull Bows, MeetRade 4’in 50PACK Elegant...
Auch 24pcs Pull Bows Christmas Gift Basket Knot with Ribbon...
-
$7.99
$6.99
String Bows, Basket Pull Bows, MeetRade 4’in 50PACK Elegant...
String Bows, Basket Pull Bows, MeetRade 4’in 50PACK Elegant...
-
$7.99
Auch 24pcs Pull Bows Christmas Gift Basket Knot with Ribbon...
Auch 24pcs Pull Bows Christmas Gift Basket Knot with Ribbon...
$6.99

Last update on 2021-04-20 / Amazon

You’ll also need your favorite succulents, air plants or flowers to put on the corsage. We like to take one succulent cutting that’s bigger than all the others and make it the focal point of the corsage. Echeverias and Hens and Chicks are great for this because they have beautiful, colorful rosettes that look a lot like flowers!

For the smaller cuttings, we like to use Jade or Jelly Bean succulents because they have interesting leaf shapes and textures. Small flowers like Forget-Me-Nots also look great alongside succulent cuttings!

To secure all of these cuttings to the bracelet, you’ll need floral glue. You’ll also need some sharp scissors for this project.

Our Pick
E6000 Craft Adhesive

Industrial strength craft adhesive that's ideal for bonding wood, fabric, leather, ceramic, glass, and metal.


We earn a commission if you click this link and make a purchase at no additional cost to you.
How to Make a Succulent Corsage
@besserina

Methodology Behind Making a Succulent Corsage

Before you begin, grab your corsage bracelet and lay it on a flat surface. If you’re making your own bow, get out the satin ribbon, floral wire, and your pair of scissors.

Making the Bow

To make the bow, cut a long string of ribbon off of the spool. You’ll form the bow by looping and twisting the ribbon, just like the woman does in the below video. Once you’ve formed the ribbon, you’ll secure it with some of the floral wire.

If you’re using a pull bow, get it ready by pulling the strings. If you need a little help, here’s a great video tutorial!

Next, you’re going to want to secure the bow to the corsage bracelet. Put a dab of floral glue in the center of the floral bracelet and on the bow you just made. Wait a couple of seconds for the glue to get tacky and then secure the bow to the bracelet.

Now grab your scissors and cut the loop in the center of the bow. This is where your main succulent or flower will go.

Attaching Your Succulents

How to Make a Succulent Corsage
@sugarssuccs

Grab the plant or flower cutting you’re using and put a dab of floral glue on the back. Put a little glue on the bow too to ensure that it sticks. Wait for the glue to get a little tacky and place the cutting on the bow, applying a little pressure to make sure it sticks.

Now you’ll want to take some small cuttings from your plants and attach them to the bow. Apply glue and tuck them in wherever you think they’ll look good. There’s no right or wrong way to place your plants!

If you want to get a little fancy, you can also add rhinestones or pearls to your corsage. You can attach them with a dab of floral glue. They’ll add a little extra glamour and elegance to your succulent corsage!

WXJ13 1800 Pieces Flatback Rhinestones Glass Round Brilliant, 5...
Sooyee Art Faux Pearls 1700-Pcs Loose Beads no Hole 1.1 Lbs...
WXJ13 1800 Pieces Flatback Rhinestones Glass Round Brilliant, 5...
Sooyee Art Faux Pearls 1700-Pcs Loose Beads no Hole 1.1 Lbs...
$7.59
$12.99
WXJ13 1800 Pieces Flatback Rhinestones Glass Round Brilliant, 5...
WXJ13 1800 Pieces Flatback Rhinestones Glass Round Brilliant, 5...
$7.59
Sooyee Art Faux Pearls 1700-Pcs Loose Beads no Hole 1.1 Lbs...
Sooyee Art Faux Pearls 1700-Pcs Loose Beads no Hole 1.1 Lbs...
$12.99

Last update on 2021-04-20 / Amazon

You’re all done! Now all that’s left to do is leave the corsage out to dry for a little while. After it’s done drying, stick it in the fridgeit’ll stay fresh in there for about a week.

When you’re ready to wear it, adjust the succulent corsage bracelet to fit your wrist and show it off to all your friends!

ALSO READ:

How to Make a Succulent Corsage
@besserina

Now that you know how to make a succulent corsage, are you going to try it? Let us know in the comments section below and post your creation to ur exclusive succulent- loving Facebook group!

For some inspiration, check out our Pinterest to help find the perfect succulents for your corsage. If you’ve made one already, please let us know too! We’d love to see them. Before you go, if you want a FREE 30 day trial to Amazon Prime, feel free to sign up here. Our team member just notified the entire team not too long ago that we partnered with Amazon for this!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Happy crafting & happy planting! ?

What is a Cactus Plant?

What is a Cactus?

The cactus is a very popular plant, no questions about that, right?

Among the more than 10,000 succulent species out there, cacti steal the show with just how every plant enthusiast is on the prowl on grabbing at least one of them. They surely reign supreme not just in the succulents’ circles but the whole houseplants empire.

You have one sitting around, right? Definitely. I know we do.

So, it’s only prudent that you at least have a little bit of more information about your plant. Here it is.

What is a Cactus?
cactus on cactus on cactus @olivra.cactusucculents

Why is it Named “Cactus”?

Cactus is a Latin-inspired word from the ancient Greek life. Back then, kaktos was the word used to refer to a spiky plant that was prevalent in Sicily.

But as time will have it, the name gradually became a reference to the present day plants we know, most which are desert dwellers in the wild.

Cactus in the Botany World

In scientific terms, cactus belongs to the family— Cactaceae. This family is a vast collection under which there are more than 120 genera and an upwards of 1,700 species.

Though the majority here grow in arid and semiarid areas, a select few cacti thrive in tropical regions with far much better conditions for lush growth.

Here’s an article depicting the difference between cacti and succulents.

What is a Cactus?
stand tall @thornlesscactus_

Origin of Cactus

Cacti are largely endemic to the American continents. The whole regions from north to south are home to dozens of known cactus plants.

The northern limit stretches all the way to Western Canada. In the south, the cacti cover extends to Chile, British Columbia, Alberta Argentina and Patagonia.

Mexico takes the lion’s share, as the country native to the most species of cacti.

The only cactus without its roots in these regions is the Rhipsalis Baccifera, which has been found to be a native of parts of East Africa, Madagascar and Sri Lanka.

Before we continue, we wanted to share this awesome opportunity from Amazon, in honor of our recent partnership with the online- giant! For a limited time, Amazon is offering a FREE 30-day trial of their famous Amazon Prime Membership. Get full access to all the perks, including FREE 2-day shipping on all eligible products. Click this link to learn more and sign up today!

What is a Cactus?
pickles? Or cacti? @houseplantcanvas

General Characteristics of Cacti

Most cacti are adapted to thrive in conditions of little water. The following are the physical attributes that make this possible. Of course, there are exceptions which form just a small part of the cactus type.

If you need some additional help on when to water your succulents, we have the perfect article for you!

What is a Cactus?
bright and sunny @houstonpetals

Short Growing Season and Long Periods of Dormancy

Water availability (rather lack of it) is a strong contributor to this. The growing seasons coincide with periods of rain, which are obviously short-lived. Consequently, the plants have to use this limited time (and the additional vital resource) to develop.

Growth is put on hold as soon the rains are over to preserve as much water as possible.

When it’s time to repot your cactus, check out this article!

A Shallow Root System

This is very important in the desert ecosystem, where rains are far apart. The roots are found near the surface and spread out over a large area so that any water droplets are immediately sucked up and stored.

What is a Cactus?
careful where you walk… @natizxy

Highly Modified Leaves in the Form of Spines

Most cacti are devoid of leaves. Instead, they possess spikes that serve a number purposes

  • They deter desert herbivores from feeding on them
  • Reduce loss of water from the stem by being hindrances to free flow of air around the plant.

The spikes also serve as distinctive features of different cacti plants. By looking at them, you can be able to tell which plant it is that you’re handling. That’s by observing properties like color, number, shape, size and hardness.

Just in case you may be a little clumsy (like some us here), here’s a useful pair of tweezers that have help us pull out a cactus thorn… or two.

What is a Cactus?
too cute to eat @marj.jpg

Store Water in Their Stems

Succulents typically store water in their leaves. But for cacti, their reduced leaves come up short on size.

So, the stem is the part equipped for this function. The presence of spikes and a waxy cuticle greatly reduces the amount that is lost in the air.

The stem is also a food factory for the plant.

Here’s a more in-depth conversation about what adaptations a cactus has. Check it out! And here’s a useful watering bottle for when your cacti become thirsty!

What is a Cactus?
an army of cacti @theboskycompany

Specialized Branches in the Form of Areoles

Areoles are a feature specific to cacti. They are small hairy structures found on the stems.

From the areoles, spikes and flowers emerge. Areoles on the lower parts of the stem become inactive after a few years leaving those at the terminals to keep up with their function.

What is a Cactus?
photogenic cactus @viverolafelicidad

More Than Just Ornamental Plants— Uses of Cacti

Of course cacti are grown for the main reason of raising the aesthetic appeal of a place – be it a home or an office. Or as a hobby.

Here’s a few planters we love tat would look great in your house! Check out this one with a bamboo archway, these cute minimalistic ceramic pots, or even this festive cactus pot!

The large number of species really does provide more than enough options in terms of color, shape and size. But then this same number is a gateway to more cacti benefits. Have a look.

And if you’re curious… Here’s our interpretation of what it means if someone gifts you a cactus!

What is a Cactus?
it’s a cactus… inside of a cactus! @uurscactuses

Food

Cacti are a known source of food in many regions across the world. Generally, any fleshy fruit from a cactus is a potential savory delight.

Apart from fruits, flowers and pads of some cacti species are edible. The Indian Fig Cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) is one of the plants whose fruits and pads can be munched. It is widely recognized for this in Mexico and parts of Africa. Check out this edible Prickly Pear Cactus.

Other cacti grown for food are Carnegiea Gigantea, Stenocereus Queretaoensis, Hylocereus Undatus among others.

Cacti can even become a part of your daily beauty routine, with this antioxidant serum!

Fodder / Forage

Human beings are not the only beneficiaries of the edible nature of some cacti. Livestock too enjoy a mouthful of these desert vegetation. But first, the spines will have to be removed. Manadacaru (Cereus Jamacaru) is the most common cactus for this purpose.

What is a Cactus?
bloomin’ cactus @thetrexgarden

Medicine

The medicinal properties of cacti are just limitless. Among the numerous species, there are a host of them that can be used to combat common illnesses effectively. They are:

  • Night-blooming Cereus whose stems and flowers are processed to manufacture medicine for urinary tract infections
  • Peyote whose extracts play a role in regulating blood pressure and sleep
  • Prickly Pear which is used to treat a range of conditions like indigestion, burned wounds and oedema. Here’s our article devoted to the Prickly Pear!

Other common uses include fencing and making alcoholic drinks (fermenting fruit syrup).

What is a Cactus?
Lime green cactus! @mook_cactus

What do you think? Are you ready to own a cactus (or add 10 more to your already existing collection)?

Let us help you get started! Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents and cacti, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today! 

Want to continue expanding your cacti knowledge? Check out these additional Succulent City articles — How to Check if Your Cactus is Dying, How to Make Your Own Succulent Soil at Home, 9 Rare Cacti That’s Hard to Find, or What is the Purpose of Thorns on a Cactus Plant + many, many more on our website!

Thanks for reading! Be sure to join our ever- growing succulent community on Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest!

Calling all succulents/cacti lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Happy planting! ?

8 Best Indoor Cacti You Need to Have

Best indoor cacti

Mini succulents and other conventional houseplants are in for a big competition. Cacti décor designs are springing up from every corner of the internet and boy, don’t they just look gorgeous!

Taming these desert survivors may seem hard, but not to cacti connoisseurs. Nothing beats the unique rustic look exuded by cacti. With their spiny texture and varied shapes, you’d be forgiven to think they’re living sculptures.

And no, they don’t need to be watched closely. Cacti actually thrive on neglect. (Yes, deprive them and they’ll still grow). Love them too much and you’ll soon be burying lots of them.

This is good news to beginner gardeners, busy plant lovers or brown thumbs who are looking for some bragging rights. Whichever category you fall into, cacti got you covered, talk about independence! If you’re a brown thumb, be sure to join our Succulent Plant Lounge, a lot of the members here converse and help each other out, it’s a great community to be in for succulents.

Sold on getting one of these alien-looking plants for your living room? Picking just any variety for your indoor needs may not be a good idea. Certain cacti varieties are just not meant to be tamed. Be that as it may, there are cacti species that thrive indoors and may even reward you with spectacular blooms.

Ready to explore? Let’s do this!

Bishop’s Cap— Astrophytum Myriostigma

Native to the Chihuahuan desert of Mexico, the Bishop’s Cap cacti is the most popular species in the genus Astrophytum. Its appearance resembles a star-shaped globe with equally divided segments. This hardy plant is usually green in color while young but as it matures, it’s covered by a grayish coating of fine scales to protect it from sunburn.

Tiny spines are lined on the ribs that separate the plant’s segments giving it a distinctive look. Take good care of it and it’ll give you brilliant yellow blooms during spring. Feeding it some fertilizer from time to time will do just that, any highly rated fertilizer for cacti like this will work just fine.

These dainty flowers appear at the center top of the plant where the ridges that separate the different segments converge.

Also known as the Monk’s Hood, taking care of the Bishop’s Cap is an easy ride. They can thrive in light shade but require sunlight for at least three hours a day. They can do well in a window sill on a south or west-facing window. Subject them to plenty of sun if you want to see the blooms.

We think a great window sill planter like this modern white one will look wonderful with the Bishop’s Cap cactus.

Astrophytum myriostigma prefers quick-draining soil so avoid your regular gardening mix. Water infrequently as too much water will lead to an early grave. You may feed them diluted fertilizer once a month during their growing season. Propagation is mainly done through seeds.

Barrel Cactus— Ferrocactus Species

Arrayed with ferocious spines, this quirky cactus makes a perfect complement to your existing interiorscape. As the name suggests, the barrel cactus is spherical with long spines on its ribs. The spikes act as protection to the juicy, edible pulp located on the inside.

The barrel cactus has a long life span and may live for a couple of decades. Its size varies depending on the species. Some are squat while others may be as tall as 10 feet. (Now that’s one tall and spiky plant!)

This cactus is a true sun lover and prefers full sun for a few hours a day. Setting it beside a large uncovered window will ensure it gets plenty of sun for optimum growth. Water sparingly, and do so after the soil has completely dried out. Use commercial cacti mix to prevent damp soil-related problems like root rot and fungi.

If you find yourself in a situation where you have to handle the barrel cactus with your bare hands, don’t. Be safe with cut resistant gloves so that the sharp spines won’t make a dent in your flesh.

Old Lady Cactus— Mammilaria Hahniana

Old Lady Cactus Mammilaria Hahniana
@succulents_4ever

Native to the Guanajuato state of Mexico, this cactus is tall growing reaching a height of 10 inches. Mammilaria hahniana is commonly referred to as the old lady cactus due to its white hair covering on the entire plant. The white hairs and spine also serve to protect the plant from the intense sun.

The old lady cactus blooms in spring and summer producing attractive purple flowers that may even grow in a ring on the plant’s apex.

Use well-draining cacti mix while potting this plant as they hate sitting in damp soil. Water once a week during the hot season and once a month during winter. Mammilaria hahniana will readily bloom in bright sunlight.

Learn more about this succulent here!

Angel Wings Cactus— Opuntia Albispina

Also known as bunny ears, the angel wings cactus is a desert denizen, highly adapted to small amounts of water and extensive heat. It has a striking appearance with its flat pads endowed with glochids –a fancy term for the white prickles you see on its surface.

Unlike most cacti, it lacks spines as these are replaced with clusters of hair on the surface of the pads. Careful though, these glochids can still injure you so take care while handling it.

Opuntia albispina is a summer bloomer producing creamy yellow flowers with globular edible fruits that are purple in color. Provide it with lots of light, quick-draining soil, and infrequent watering and you’ll have one happy angel wing cactus.

Christmas Cactus— Schlumbergera Bridgessii

Well, if you can’t pronounce the complex scientific name, don’t worry. You can also call it the thanksgiving cactus. Unlike most cacti, the Christmas cactus is spineless, characterized by its serrated green leaves.

This Brazilian cactus blooms in winter, producing showy tubular flowers in shades of purple, pink, red, and pink.

Keep your Christmas cactus in shaded light with a few hours in direct bright sunlight. Exposing this attractive indoor cactus in the hot sun will lead to sunburn. This plant is native to the tropical forests of Brazil and so it needs more water than other cacti. Thus, water frequently during its growing seasons but be careful to let the water drain out. If you’re wondering, propagation is also possible via cuttings.

Learn more about the beautiful Christmas cactus here.

Saguaro Cactus— Carnegiea Gigantean

Native to the Sonoran Desert of Mexico, the Saguaro cactus is a slow-growing and long-lived plant that can live up to two centuries. Its scientific name, Carnegiea Gigantean means gigantic candle. And quite rightly so! This cactus can grow up to 40 feet in height.

Saguaros are barrel-shaped with water storing capacity in the external pleats. It is hard on blooming and may take over 35 years for flowers to appear.

Carnegiea prefers bright sunlight. Water only once a month and cut back on watering during winter and other cool seasons. Let the soil be grainy and quickly draining for optimum growth.

Rat Tail Cactus— Aporocactus Flagelliformis

Can you throw a guess of the native home of this beauty? That’s right! The magnificent Mexico –home to almost all cacti.

If rats annoy you, well hopefully not this quirky rat tail cactus. With its trailing stems covered with fine spines, it’s definitely the perfect plant to set up on a hanging basket. The rat tail cactus thrives on bright sunlight and if everything goes well, they may bloom in spring bringing forth spectacular pink flowers.

Water as you would any cactus, making sure not to overwater the plant. A well-draining commercial cacti mix is recommended to prevent root rot. You can share the rat tail cactus with friends through cuttings. More the merrier! If you have some to give away, why not lend some to our members at Succulent Plant Lounge?

Be sure to check out “The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know

Star Cactus— Astrophytum Asteria

It’s a short, plump and round plant with approximately eight ribs each arrayed with woolly areoles. Also known as the sand dollar cactus or sea urchin cactus, Astrophytum asteria is generally green in color covered with decorative white dots.

When conditions are right, the star cactus blooms during spring, producing alluring yellow flowers having orange shades at the center. The fruits are pink, gray, or reddish, with woolly hair covering them.

Taking care of Astrophytum asteria is quite a breeze. Use grainy cacti mix that’s well-draining and water them twice a month. Ensure the soil dries out completely before in between watering. These sun lovers prefer bright light so get them the south or west-facing window for healthy growth.

If you’re looking for a more in-depth guide of this fantastic cactus, check this out!

ALSO READ:


Have enough of the cacti yet? If you get any particular cactus please let us know and if you want us to write a full in-depth article on how to take care of one of these cacti, don’t be afraid to comment it below.

Succulent City is here to help!

Did you enjoy reading this article? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Jumping Cholla Cactus (Cylindropuntia Fulgida)

Jumping Cholla Cactus Cylindropuntia Fulgida

You may have seen this hairy megaflora shimmering in a golden-brown glow of the hot desert sunset. It has a lazy stem, like an old man trying to stand straight with multiple branches concealed under thousands of spikes upon spikes upon spikes. It has a reputation for being one of the most terrifying foliage in the world, causing woe and pain to any creature that dares cross its path. This is a close-up moment with Cylindropuntia fulgida.

Stretching across the arid plains of the Sonoran Desert to parts of the Colorado Desert in South West USA, the Cylindropuntia fulgida grows wildly, stretching its roots to altitudes about 4000 ft above sea level. There are about 30 different species of cacti belonging to the genus Cylindropuntia, with the Fulgida being the most feared.

Jumping Cholla Cactus Cylindropuntia Fulgida
There are about 30 different species of cacti @labrujaitzel

Cylindropuntia Fulgida

The Cylindropuntia fulgida is an arborescent plant, meaning it takes the shape of a tree. It has a main cylindrical trunk that holds multiple, low drooping branches. It grows to a height between 6 and 15 ft tall (1.8 and 4.5 meters) and 8 ft (2.4 meters) in diameter, and the entire plant is covered in wart-like projections.

Instead of having leaves, the Cylindropuntia fulgida has 0.5 to 1-inch (1.27 to 2.54 cm) long spines coming out of areoles. There are about 6 to 12 spines in every areole, and the spines have a paper-thin sheath that reflects light, illuminating the plant in silver, gold, white, or tan hues. These spines have a double duty to the plant; to protect it from hungry herbivores and to act as a shield, preventing the plant from overheating in the desert sun.

Jumping Cholla Cactus

During February and March, Cylindropuntia fulgida blossoms yellow-green flowers at the edges of the branches. After each flowering season, the plant produces a red, pear-shaped fruit that looks wrinkled and is spotted with a few spines. These fruits have been lifesavers for bighorn sheep and certain deer species, especially during drought seasons.

The fruits grow off the same stalk every year, creating a hanging fruit chain that can get up to 2 feet (60.96 cm) long. This fruit string gives this plant the colloquial names Hanging Chain Cholla, Chain Fruit Cholla, Cholla Brincadora, Velas de Coyote, and Boxing Glove Cholla. This cactus is also known as Jumping Cholla Cactus from the ease at which the thorny stems break off or ‘jump’ on anything that passes by.

Jumping Cholla Cactus Cylindropuntia Fulgida
Jumping Cholla In The Desert

Spiky on the Outside, As Well as the Inside

As if the sharp spikes were not enough to dissuade you from going near the plant, the spikes of the Cylindropuntia fulgida are hollow and have barbs called glochids. When these indented spines attach themselves to any place or surface with moisture, for example, the skin, the glochids curve once they have made contact, interlocking their spines underneath the surface of the skin. Just the thought of it makes you want to wince in pain and agony.

A Challenger For Green Thumbs

As absolutely insane as this plant sounds, it can be the showstopper to break the usual garden plant monotony. The one thing that Cylindropuntia fulgida is picky about is the type of soil it grows in.

This cactus prefers soil with pH levels of between 6.0 and 7.5. Too much acidity or alkalinity in the soil will destroy the roots of the plant. The soil must also be well-draining, because like other succulents, the Cylindropuntia fulgida is very susceptible to root rot.

The Cylindropuntia fulgida is a hard-core, drought-resistant cactus that loves to spend at least 6 hours a day in direct sunlight. This water-once-and-forget-about-it plant does well with short, infrequent drinks of water during the summer and an occasional spritz during winter. When you want to get the best out of your Cylindropuntia fulgida, you could treat your plant to a granular fertilizer that is formulated for succulents and cacti, or good quality, water-soluble fertilizer.

ALSO READ:

 


Next time you are roaming around the desert, keep your eye out for this spiky little creature because wherever it lands if there is moisture, it will immediately start to grow. As mother always said, be careful, don’t bring home strangers!

Thank you for reading! Be sure to check out similar articles from the cacti species like “Giant Barrel Cactus – Echinocactus Platyacanthus” or even “Mysterious Christmas Cactus – Schlumbergera Bridgesii“.

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read. 

Happy Planting! 🌵

>