9 Types of Cacti for Succulent Lovers

9 Types of Cacti

For the plant lover you are, cacti are no doubt a top pick. And for a couple of ~good~ reasons.

With the numerous shapes, sizes, and colors, every type of cacti can offer you the ultimate all-in-one decor solution— at home or work. But what’s even more appealing is their simplistic nature that makes caring for them a breeze.

You don’t need some top-level gardening skills to have these desert- dwellers shining — although that would be a nice thing. And no full attention either. Occasional peeks at them can go a long way – of course, coupled with a few very simple care regimens.

Seriously, with all the various types of cacti, there is absolutely no reason why you shouldn’t grow at least one for yourself!

So, with all the types of cacti out there, how do you settle on a few serious plants? This is an overwhelming decision to make, right? Well, you could grow as many types of cacti as you wish. But, there isn’t just enough space and time for that.

For a start, have a look at the following 9 types of cacti.

But before we dive into that… If you want 2 FREE E-Books, sign up here for a FREE 30-day trial of Amazon’s Audible program! Consider it a gift from your friends at Succulent City!

9 Types of Cacti
9 Types of Cacti @csg.succulents

Chollas – Cylindropuntia

These are a type of cacti popular for their barbed spines that grab on tightly to anybody that comes in contact with them (clothes, fur and so on). That’s something to be weary of right there.

Be careful not to touch any species of Cholla with bare skin. You’ll regret it, guaranteed.

The species come in a range of sizes, with some growing to sizes of trees while others being creepers or shrubs. Get your own Cholla on Amazon!

These natives of Mexico and parts of the United States require a well-drained soil and adequate sunlight.

We highly recommend this soil mix by Bonsai Jack. It is one of the best soil mixes on the market for your garden. It doesn’t need to be mixed with any other soil, it helps fight root rot, perfectly pH Balanced & is pathogen-free (ie: won’t kill your plants). This soil is the go-to for our office plants. Go ahead and get the 7 Gallon Bag if you are plant nerd like us :). Pick up some of our favorite soil by clicking here: Bonsai Jack Succulent Soil.

Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil - Jacks Gritty Mix #111-7...
  • FAST DRAINING & NURTURING: Our succulent potting...
  • IDEAL FOR ACID-LOVING PLANTS: Bonsai Jack’s...
  • MADE WITH EXPERTISE: Our ready-to-use trademarked...
  • MADE IN THE USA: All Bonsai Jack soil products are...
  • SATISFACTION GUARANTEED: Our soil mix is available...

Last update on 2021-08-02 / Amazon

Additionally, the Chollas do best in temperature ranges of 50° F to 70°F (10°C – 21°C).

Watering is a huge deal before maturity, but always ensure the top soil in your garden is dry before doing it. When mature, watering can be revisited occasionally. In cases of prolonged drought, keep up with the watering routine you’d stick to when the plant is establishing. Give your Chollas a home in these planters! They’ll look great in any home or office!

ALSO READ:

9 Types of Cacti
Chollas @fdvlandscape_photography

Christmas Cactus – Schlumbergera Bridgesii

This such a unique member of the cactaceae family in a couple of ways.

For one, it is not a natural desert dweller like the rest. Instead, it’s a coastal resider, the Brazilian coastline being the natural habitat. And that means it can still do well in conditions other types of cacti find unfavorable.

Secondly, they favor low light sites— as direct sun rays can have a devastating effect on the leaves. If your home or office is a lowlight setting, here’s our list of 7 best succulents for low light environments!

Finally, the Christmas Cactus plant lacks the characteristic of spines, present on a lot of types of cacti species, instead of spotting serrated true leaves. The species also develop colorful flowers, including red and pink. If a pop of color is what you’re looking for, get yourself a Christmas Cactus, or check out these 5 succulents with red flowers and these succulents with orange flowers!

As it is not suited to desert conditions like its cousins, Schlumbergera Bridgesii should never sit in a completely dry potting mix. Always water when the mix is partially dry.

The Christmas Cactus plant can do with a little bit of low light. But guess what– if you want to see those blooms… give it some light – indirect, that is.

The Christmas Cactus can develop and become rather large. So, we found this set of 2 beautiful planters—one smaller and one large, that you can transfer your cactus plant through when it gets larger.

9 Types of Cacti
Christmas Cactus @plantgazing

Hedgehog Cactus – Echinocereus

Echinocereus is a genus type of cacti that grow in clusters of 3 to 60 stems. Each of these stems are ribbed with numerous spines on its surface.

The flowers (which are usually large) form at the end of these almost cylindrical stems and develop into edible fruits. Yep… Cacti and succulents can be edible. Check out this list of 6 edible succulents you may like to taste!

The Hedgehog Cactus plant can tolerate temperatures up to 50°F minimum and thrive on moderate watering – once every other two weeks.

Be sure to keep the frost away during the cold months!

Let the plants enjoy the sun – lots of it. Ideally, 6-8 hours a day is fine. They love it that way!

To keep up with the hedgehog theme, we found this adorable hedgehog- themed planter and this cute hedgehog and cactus coffee mug! Check them out!

9 Types of Cacti
Hedgehog Cactus @chubbyplantpeople

Saguaro – Carnegiea Gigantea

Saguaro is one of the few types of cacti that grow up to be huge, imposing, spine-covered trees. This native of Mexico (Sonora Desert) can reach a height of 12 m upon maturity – which can take up to a hundred years! There’s even a grow-your-own kit on Amazon! Take a look, here.

The barrel-shaped stem is the water storage room, expanding considerably to keep as much of it as possible. A mature Saguaro stem can take up more than 700 liters of water in a rainstorm!

Keep your Carnegiea Gigantea in a well-draining soil mix, which you can get here, for optimum growth. And while at it, have it get access to a healthy amount of sunlight.

And this type of cactus plant needs very little watering to thrive – basically once a month during the growing seasons. With all the water-saving capacity this cactus has though, you may need a large watering can! In winter, when the plant is dormant, consider watering once or twice for the whole season.

9 Types of Cacti
Saguaro @abitofeastandwest

Peyote – Lophophora Williamsii

Another spineless member of the cactaceae family.

Peyote is recognized for its chemical components that give a general high feeling when ingested – used mainly by religious groups.

This type of cactus plant can attain a height of up to an inch and a diameter of 2 inches. The stem is green in color and globular with a number of ribs dotted with fuzzy hairs.

Give your Peyote cactus a well-draining mix and cut back on watering as soon seedlings are good to go.

Make a point of shielding your plant against direct sun rays. The Peyote does best in temperatures 70°F to 90°F (21°C -32°C). If keeping outside, try keeping your Peyote under this sun-blocking shade cloth! Helps keep your plants from becoming sun-burnt.

Just so you know: unless you’re a member of the Native American Church, stay away from the Peyote. Due to its dwindling population, growing this type of cactus plant has been outlawed and it’s only permitted to members of NAC specifically those in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Oregon and Nevada.

9 Types of Cacti
Peyote @j.lithops_conophytum

Bunny Ears Cactus – Opuntia Microdasys

The Bunny Ear Cactus is one of the most grown type of cacti species, owing to its rabbit head appearance.

It lacks a central stem, instead, it is composed of pad-like segments of varying length and breadth. Each of the segments are covered by lots of glochids occurring in clusters. And they cause some serious irritation on the skin, so beware of the deceivingly fine darts.

The Opuntia Microdasys does best with temperatures of up to 100°F (38°C) but prefer readings below this during the cold season – typically between 50°F and 65°F (10-18°C).

Don’t fret too much about water. The general rule for cacti holds – the less the better. Pick up your watering can as soon as the potting mix is dry at the top.

Check out a more in-depth conversation about the Bunny Ears Cactus in our article, here!

9 Types of Cacti
Bunny Ears Cactus @synthesispgh

Old Lady Cactus – Mammillaria Hahniana

This is a solitary growing type of cactus with the stem bearing a cylindrical shape. The entire plant is covered with white hairs and spines, hence the name “Old Lady.”

Summer and spring are the seasons when the Old Lady Cactus grows up pink blossoms at the apex.

Mammillaria Hahniana is quite hardy and can tolerate temperatures as low as -5°C (23°F) to -10°C (14°F). Find out what a “hard” or a “soft” cactus is, here

The ideal watering frequency is once a week during the growing seasons and once a month in winter.

Want to see those blossoms? Be sure to let the sun shine on the Old lady.

9 Types of Cacti
Old Lady Cactus @b.e.s_garden

Epiphyllum

This is a collection of close to 20 epiphytic cacti endemic to Central America.

The stems are broad and flat, usually with lobbed edges. Epiphyllum Oxypetalum is a particularly popular species in this genus.

These cacti aren’t so fond of direct sunlight, so shielding them under other plants is highly recommended.

Use a well-draining mix and apply a sporadic watering regimen in order to have healthy Epiphyllum plants – once every two weeks for spring to fall and once a month during winter.

9 Types of Cacti
Epiphyllum @a.planted.life

Star Cactus – Astrophytum Asterias

The Star Cactus is native to Mexico and parts of the United States. The plants are small and globular, reaching a maximum height of 2 inches and a diameter of 6 inches. The stem is ribbed with each rib having a couple of white hairy areoles.

The blooms, which are yellow, come out to play between March and May.

Astrophytum Asterias do love sunlight, so be sure to expose it to the rays every few hours per day for better growth.

Water this plant once every two weeks during the growing seasons. Reduce this frequency when the plant enters dormancy in winter – once a month should do it.

Do the Star Cactus sound like the plant for you? Take a look at our article dedicated to this unique plant, and find out more!

9 Types of Cacti
Star Cactus @galateasart

Think you’ve found your ideal type of cactus to incorporate into your unique lifestyle? Check out this amazing opportunity to help get your collection started… Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today!

Comment below which types you’ve added to your own home or garden, or share with fellow succulent lovers in our exclusive Succulent City Plant Lounge Facebook group!

For additional succulent content, we’re on Instagram and Pinterest! Check them out for daily succulent inspiration!

Want to enhance your succulent knowledge? We have some additional articles for you to try out! Take a look at Can Succulents Survive in My Work Environment, Why the Prickly Pear Cactus is One of the Most Popular Cacti, 9 Cacti That are Hard to Find, and What Adaptations Does a Cactus Have. You’ll be a succulent and cactus guru in no time!

Happy planting, friends! ?

What Is The Purpose of Thorns on The Cactus Plant?

What is the Purpose of Thorns on a Cactus Plant?

Cacti are beautiful plants. I mean that’s why you have a few of them around, right? We’re guilty of it for sure…

But with this good look, comes the grueling task of having to deal with the thorns, or rather spines as they’re usually referred to in botanical circles. Yes, they may add to the beauty of these plants (with a variety of colors and sizes). But what if they were a bit, say, tender?

Well, if the spines existed for the sole purpose of sitting around your home just maybe that would have been possible. But we all know where they were really meant to be – out there in mostly dry environments braving the harshest of conditions.

And these spines play a huge role in this coping. They’re an adaptation that has ensured the survival of cacti out there in places where a majority of floral is non-existent.

These thorns range from the long and blatantly don’t-mess-with-us types to the small, fine and yet vicious glochids. Despite this, their functions are more or less the same.

Purpose of Thorns on Cactus Plant

Let’s get to it!

Shade by day insulation by night

A thing with desert temperatures is that they’re always swinging to the extremes – day and night.

During the day, temperatures are sky high with the shining sun. As the day wears off and the sun disappears in the opposite direction, a downward spiral in readings kicks in resulting in very cold nights.

Now, these aren’t very nice fluctuations for any living thing out there. And that’s where thorns save the day for cacti.

Their numerous number on some species adds up to form a considerable amount of cover for the plant. So, during the day, the cactus plant is safe from the scalding hot sun (and the accompanying high temperatures). During the night when temperatures are bottom low, the cactus plant is kept warm by a thin layer of air – attributable to the thorns.

Protection from predators

A known fact: there is very little vegetation in the desert. But you know what?

Still, there is a considerable number of herbivores that need food in the same desert. They need vegetation to keep going. And water, of course.

Cacti would have been great sources for both of the above. Only that they would have been extinct by now, maybe. Most of these animals wouldn’t dare touch the cacti. So, definitely they have their thorns to thank for that.

Well, it’s true that some desert animals still have a way around the spines and do manage to get a bite (pack rats, bighorn sheep, desert tortoise etc). But it’s also true that the sharp thorns have kept away lots of others from munching the cactuses out of existence. I mean seriously, would you ever want to munch on something like a cactus, talk about very painful dental visit.

Diffusing Light

Cacti are light-loving by nature. Each part has to get plenty of it for the plants to grow accordingly.

But sometimes this is not possible largely due to the style of growth of some. For instance, shrubby ones. Light is going to reach just a few stems. Well, that’s if the cactus plant was just a smooth-stemmed structure. But bless the thorns –they split up light, evenly distributing it around the whole plant.

Water traps

In fog-prevalent deserts, thorns are quite instrumental in quenching the plant. They trap enough of this fog to turn it into water droplets that later find their way down around the base of the plant.

With the shallow root system common in cacti, the water is quickly absorbed by the plant. And the cacti live on.

ALSO READ:

Air traps

As mentioned above, thorns trap air around cacti that is pivotal in the survival of the plant two major ways. Insulation is one. The other is water preservation.

The thin film of air reduces the rate of evaporation of water from the plant. As a result, very little of this water is lost to the atmosphere. In a desert setting, this is a huge deal.

Propagation

Certainly not all. Especially not the large ones.

Glochids are the ones that serve this purpose perfectly in some cacti plants like Cholla.

The glochids are tiny, numerous and get easily (and firmly) attached to a passing body due to their barbed shafts. That way, segments of the plant are carried from the parent to some other place where they form new plants upon being dropped.


Wrapping Things Up

That’s how these thorns have helped cacti survive in the wild. The thorns could be pointless now, you know, with all the care these plants get as houseplants. But their prickly parts are not going away anytime soon.

Who knows, maybe they will as they spend more time in pots. But, that will definitely take a lot of years.

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

When Should You Really Water Your Succulents

When you should water you succulents?

Everyone praises succulents as being really easy to care for, so it’s kind of embarrassing when one dies on you.

Don’t worry, you (probably) don’t have a brown thumb. There are a few misconceptions about how to care for succulents well. You really only have to straighten out one thing to become a succulent maven – watering.

How often to water succulents?

Here’s a little-known secret for succulent care – the amount that you water succulents isn’t nearly as important as how often you water them.

It makes sense if you consider why succulents are so sensitive to water.

Since most succulents and cacti are native to dry, desert-y conditions, they have adaptations to prevent water loss. That thick waxy sheen on the leaves is called a “cuticle” and it prevents water from evaporating out of the leaves. Succulents even have a special version of photosynthesis (called CAM photosynthesis) where they only open their pores at night to minimize water loss.

These plants are really good at retaining water. So good, in fact, that they can accidentally drown themselves. Plants actually breathe mostly through their roots, believe it or not. If those roots are wet, they can’t breathe.

Succulent roots have evolved to act like every drop of water might be the last. They cling jealously to all the water they can find in their soil. Unfortunately, if the soil is constantly wet, it leads to root rot – a deadly illness for most plants (and succulents are particularly susceptible).

The number one killer of succulents is overwatering. But not in the sense that they get too much water – rather, they get watered too often. It’s absolutely crucial that the soil is given time to dry out between waterings.

So how often do you actually water a succulent or cactus? A good rule of thumb is to water once every 10 days. You should still check to be sure that the soil is dry (and has been for a couple days) before you water again.

How much to water succulents?

Now we know when to water our succulents and cacti, but not how much.

To figure this out, we go back to the desert these plants came from. It does actually rain in the desert, contrary to common belief. However, that only happens a couple times a year. And in the desert the saying “When it rains, it pours.” is very accurate. The sky just dumps buckets of water. Succulents like to be watered this way too, albeit a bit more often. Forget about the eyedroppers and spray bottles. Put those ‘succers’ under the faucet and drench them. You should water until the water begins to run out of the bottom of the pot. That’s how you know you’ve soaked the soil all the way through.

And that part is important – you want to ensure that all of the soil is completely wetted. If you use only a little water, it doesn’t penetrate more than the top couple of inches of soil. That forces the succulent to grow roots upwards instead of downwards. That leads to weak roots, poor stability, and an ineffective anchor for the succulent. A recipe for disaster.

Proper succulent watering technique

When you should water your succulents

While throwing your succulent in the sink is certainly a viable method, you can practice some more applied techniques for an even better effect.

We already mentioned that all the soil in the pot needs to be drenched. That’s still true. If possible, though, you should try to avoid getting water on the leaves. This opens the door to a few problems:

Mold and mildew can form in the crevices of a plant (like where the leaves meet the stem). It also provides a nice habitat for pests, who generally prefer moist environments. We recommend using a succulent watering bottle with bend watering mouth for easy control during the watering process! We really like this one by Mkono

2. Plants can’t drink through their leaves. That’s what roots are for. Any water on a leaf is being wasted.

3. Occasionally plants, even succulents, suffer from sunburn. When you leave a liquid like water on leaves while the succulent is exposed to bright sunlight, there’s a chance that the water will act like a magnifying glass and burn the leaf.

So, if you have few enough plants (or just really enjoy watering), you should water each succulent individually by pouring water at the base of the stem. Make sure to get the rest of the pot as well. If you are new to plants, we highly recommend this planting & watering tool kit.

Avoid overwatering

Water isn’t the only factor in the watering equation, actually. Soil plays a big part.

One of the qualities of soil is how much water it retains. Soil mixtures that have a lot of organic matter (stuff like peat moss, coconut coir, etc.) tend to hold a lot of water. Mixtures that mostly have minerals or inorganic matter (such as perlite or sand) don’t absorb water.

Succulents and cacti require quick-draining soil. You want the soil to dry out as quickly as possible after it’s watered. Ideally in the same day. That’s why watering in the morning is ideal – it has the whole day to evaporate.

So, grab some soil specific to succulents and cacti next time you’re out. Your plants will thank you. A quick DIY solution is to just buy a bag of perlite and mix it half and half with any other kind of soil. It’s not perfect, but it will dramatically increase drainage.

If you do not have any local places to pick up some quick-draining soil, we highly recommend this quick-draining soil from Superfly Bonsai on Amazon.

Note also that many succulents you buy (especially from big box stores) actually have a poor soil mix when they’re sold to you. You’ll probably want to repot them as soon as you’re able.

And speaking of pots – the second most important factor in preventing overwatering is having adequate drainage. That means use pots with a drainage hole. That means that teacups and terrariums aren’t optimal containers for succulents and cacti.

Without proper drainage at the bottom of a pot, water tends to pool and the roots stay wet for longer. That’s dangerous. And, no, gravel in the bottom of a pot does not constitute drainage. The water is still there. It doesn’t go anywhere.

We’re not saying you can never put them in those cutesy containers. (By the way, if you’re having trouble finding inspiration for planting succulents check out our 12 minimalistic ways to plant succulents). Just know that they might not survive it for very long or be very happy for the duration. So much for that Pinterest photo shoot you had planned, eh?

ALSO READ:

When you should water your succulents and how often

Tips for succulent watering

  • Different plants have different needs. Sometimes wildly so. Kalanchoe, for example, are pretty thirsty succulents. They begin to wilt after a week without water. The famous “butt plants”, Lithops, can only be watered three or four times a year or they promptly die. (psst: if you are looking for Lithops Seeds, we recommend these by Micro Landscape Design)
  • Always err on the side of underwatering. Succulents and cacti are literally designed to be thirsty sometimes. They can almost always bounce back from lack of water… but recovering from too much water is a dicey prospect at best.
  • If you have a community pot (a pot with multiple species of plants), water to the lowest common denominator. That means that you should water only when the “driest” plants start to get thirsty. We are following the same advice as above – it’s better for succulents to be thirsty for a while rather than overwatering.

Thanks for reading!

We hope you got some pointers on how to keep your succulent family healthy! Also, don’t forget you can receive 2 FREE Audio books of your choice from our sponsor at Audible.com. We’ve got 2 books we listen to about propagation and watering succulents, what are you thinking of listening too?

Share is caring! <3

If you enjoyed reading our blog about When You Should Water Your Succulents, be sure to check out our other blogs. Personally I think you’ll enjoy this one: 6 Best Indoor Succulents.

If you learned something, please consider buying us a succulent for our office.

Buy us a Succulent ?Buy us a Succulent ?

Enjoyed learning about When You Should Water Your Succulents? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about The Correct Way to Water Succulents. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Cactus / Schlumbergera Truncata – Everything You Need To Know

Thanksgiving Cactus Schlumbergera Truncata

Which are your favorite cacti plants for indoor planting?

The Thanksgiving cactus can easily slide into any cactus lover’s list of favorites. From a beautiful blooming season to being easy to grow, you will never get it wrong with a Schlumbergera Truncata plant.

This article will take you through the essential facts of the Thanksgiving cactus. Read on to find out more about how to best care for this plant. You will also find what to expect during different eventualities.

Thanksgiving Cactus Schlumbergera Truncata
A thanksgiving cactus in a green planter @___lia_toha

Introducing the Thanksgiving Cactus

The Thanksgiving cactus plant is a tropical cactus with its native home being in the gigantic rain forests of South America. If you happen to own the tropical plant, never treat it like the rest of the desert cacti plants. In its native land, you will find it perched on trees, which makes it epiphytic.

The naming of this plant is pretty amazing as it dons a long list of nicknames. The equally amazing cactus plant belongs to the Cactaceae family, Schlumbergera genus, and Truncata plant species.

Be sure to also check out “What Adaptations Does a Cactus Have?” to see how a cactus can adapt to different environments.

Some nicknames for Schlumbergera Truncata are

  • Crab cactus
  • Yoke cactus
  • Linkleaf plant
  • Claw cactus

Don’t be surprised to hear some succulent lovers referring to the Thanksgiving cactus as a holiday cactus. Of course, Thanksgiving is a holiday. But there is a twist as holiday cacti plants are formed by an exciting group of plants that bloom over different holidays.

To differentiate the Thanksgiving cactus from other holiday cactus, look out for its physical appearance and blooming time. Its closest sibling the Christmas cactus dons smoothness and scalloped stems. The lateness in blooming also sets it apart from the Thanksgiving cactus.

The appearance of the Thanksgiving cactus is highlighted by indented stems that have the look of a crab’s claws hence its names, the crab cactus, and claw cactus. The rain forest succulent’ stems have a midrib that connects different segments.

Check out why so many people flock to the cacti plants species as their go-to succulent choice, check out “What Is Special About A Cactus?” for more.

Thanksgiving Cactus Schlumbergera Truncata
A large thanksgiving cactus @dkerr96

Caring for the Epiphytic Thanksgiving Cactus

What are the right conditions for growing a Schlumbergera Truncata? Here are the correct standards for caring for your tropical rainforest cactus as you look forward to the petals of its beautiful flowers.

1. Watering

Watering the epiphytic cactus will utterly need not to leave your cactus sogged in too much water. A dry growing medium will make it wither or dry up while too much water encourages fungal attacks. Water your plant minimally when Fall sets in through Spring.

2. Humidity

High humidity levels characterize the tropical rainforests of South America. The tall trees that form huge canopies help in maintaining the high humidity. Your plant will happily grow and bloom if you can achieve an average of 50% humidity around it. A pebble tray will work just fine enough to reach the optimal humidity levels.

3. Temperature

By now, you must have noticed that that the right conditions for the Thanksgiving cactus mimic its origin. Temperature is not an exception. The required daytime temperatures are 16-18°C, while the nights need temperatures of between 7-13°C. These ranges are perfect when waiting for the plant to bloom. When budding, daytime temperatures should be 21-24°C and 16-21°C nights.

Using a grow light at home? Make sure you go check out “Are Grow Lights Bad for My Succulents” to see if you’re using that grow light correctly for your succulents plants.

4. Soil

All cacti plants thrive in well-drained soils, and the Schlumbergera Truncata is not any different. Soils that retain too much water encourage fungi. Your succulent will do even better if you incorporate a soluble fertilizer into the soil. Adding fertilizer can be done per fortnight only when the plant is growing until the blooms are no more.

Try making your own succulent soil at home by checking out “How to Make Your Own Succulent Soil at Home“.

5. Propagation

The Thanksgiving cactus is everything about ‘thanks.’ The plant is easy to propagate, making it a beautiful little gift for your loved ones. They will be saying lots of thank you.

So how do you propagate the Thanksgiving cactus?

Use a sharp and sterile cutting object when making your cut of its segmented stems. Ensure that you take 2-3 segments with you and ensure that it is a clean cut. Allow the cut surface to be callous for some days before putting on a well-draining growing medium.

6. Light

Thanksgiving cactus do well when exposed to bright light.

MAKE SURE TO ALSO READ:

Thanksgiving Cactus Schlumbergera Truncata
A flowering thanksgiving cactus @happygreenguys

The Thanksgiving cactus is a fantastic plant to have around you. Growing it will never get you disappointed.

Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complimentary guide.

Thank you for reading! Happy Planting! ?

How to Repot a Cactus Plant (Beginners Guide)

How to repot a cactus plant

Repotting is an inevitable activity in the life of a cactus let alone any other succulent.

Due to the fact that it is always growing (just as any plant), it is bound to overgrow the initial pot. And this necessitates a change for your cactus to keep glowing.

Typically between 2-4 years, your cacti require repotting, don’t you wish you had a new home this often?

Right below, you’ll learn about repotting a cactus (the right way) without killing your plant.

First off…

how to repot cactus plant
@cactus_of_ig

Requirements for Repotting Cacti

Repotting isn’t much different from the initial potting. Below is a recap of the requirements.

The right pot or planter

When it comes to choosing a pot for your cactus, the size and material are of utmost importance.

Usually, a pot made of clay like a terra cotta pot is preferred over a plastic one. The clay allows the roots to breath more easily which contributes to the general well-being of succulent plants.

Additionally, it boosts the drainage of the cacti potting mix hence providing just the ideal conditions for your cactus – scarce water.

On the size aspect, choose a pot that is neither too large or too small – depending on the size of the cactus you wish to pot. You want to make sure that there is just a bit of space between your cactus and the pot’s walls. A super small pot will choke up the roots ultimately killing the plant. A larger than life pot will lead to the soil mix retaining water, and you know that means for your cactus.

Also, don’t forget to ensure your pot has a few holes down there. A big enough and well flowing draining system will be crucial to your cacti’s growth.

Our Pick
We earn a commission if you click this link and make a purchase at no additional cost to you.

 

how to repot a cactus plant
@ihavenogarden

The proper potting mix

Cacti, being succulents, require a potting mix that is well-draining to provide the water scarcity condition that they’re adapted to. So your normal soil mix is a no-no. (If you’re looking for a premium cacti soil mix, here’s one we highly recommend from Superfly Bonsai).

Instead, you can grab a commercial succulent mix prepared just for your cactus. A typical cacti/succulent potting mix contains a small amount of organic materials, sand, perlite and sphagnum peat moss.

Our Pick
We earn a commission if you click this link and make a purchase at no additional cost to you.
08/02/2021 07:57 pm GMT

 

Alternatively, you can prepare your own ideal mix at home as long as you have the ingredients – and it’s not some endless collection of stuff from the outer space, although that’d be pretty cool. Check out the ingredients your cacti soil mix will need.

  • Potting soil
  • Coarse sand
  • Pumice (perlite is also a good option here)

And the procedure is straightforward – mix the above ingredients with potting soil taking up a larger share of the combination while the other two ingredients sharing the remaining part equally.

For instance, 2 parts of potting soil can be combined with 1 part of coarse sand and 1 part of pumice/perlite.

To test if you’ve indeed ended up with the real thing, wet your mixture and try squeezing it. A good one should be coarse and crumby. If not, consider adding more of sand and pumice/perlite. The coarseness and crumbiness (is that a word?) is what allows your succulent soil to have a functional draining system.

how to repot cactus plant
@thepricklybitch

Repoting a Cactus Plant

Here’s a refresher for when you first pot a cactus

In case you aren’t well informed on how to properly pot cacti in the beginning, here is a quick reminder on what you need to do. Just follow the steps below, skip to the next section if you just want to learn how you can be repotting your awesome prickly cactus.

  1. Place a well-draining material at the bottom of your pot. Gravel is fine.
  2. Fill up the pot with a well-draining mix – commercial or homemade – up to a third way of the pot.
  3. Try placing your plant in the pot. This way, you get to know if the pot’s size is ideal for it. The cactus shouldn’t be too deep into the pot nor too high up. And should leave just a bit of space between it and the pot – remember above? And, please don’t forget to watch for spikes. A pair of tongs or even cacti gloves will cover you.
  4. If all is good with the size, hold the plant centrally and fill up the remaining space with more potting mix.
  5. Firm the soil by pressing it gently. Add some more it goes down considerably but be sure to leave some watering space at the top.
  6. Give the plant its first shot of water.
Our Pick
We earn a commission if you click this link and make a purchase at no additional cost to you.
08/03/2021 01:56 am GMT

Repotting a Cactus Plant

  1. Loosen up the soil in the pot by running a blunt knife or some other gardening tool in it. Be thorough at this to avert any possibilities of damaging the plant.
  2. Remove your cactus plant being careful not to come into contact with its pricks. In case the plant is quite huge, use a rolled up towel or actual gardening gloves.
  3. Rid the roots of large soil debris and see to it that you have individual roots separated from each other.
  4. Check the roots for any pests and diseases. Treat with appropriate chemicals. Also, nip off any dead ones.
  5. Prune the very large roots. Cutting these roots will help your plant grow with much more vigor.
  6. Allow the plant to dry out for up four days. This allows the roots that might have been hurt to heal hence eliminating any risk of rot in the soil.
  7. Follow the potting procedure above to install your plant in the ideal pot. But don’t water it yet. Give it up to a week before you water it.

After that, you can go back to your normal care routine.

 

how to repot cactus plant
@a_door_ph

Repotting your cactus plant is mandatory to maintain the ideal pot size. And as long as you’ve taken your plants through the above treatment, you should do so without a problem.

Thanks for reading our repotting a cactus plant article, we hope you learned something new today in order to avoid getting pricked by the spiky thorns on cacti. Let us know if you have any tips that we didn’t share below!


BE SURE TO ALSO READ:


 

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

>