Jumping Cholla Cactus (Cylindropuntia Fulgida)

Jumping Cholla Cactus Cylindropuntia Fulgida

You may have seen this hairy megaflora shimmering in a golden-brown glow of the hot desert sunset. It has a lazy stem, like an old man trying to stand straight with multiple branches concealed under thousands of spikes upon spikes upon spikes. It has a reputation for being one of the most terrifying foliage in the world, causing woe and pain to any creature that dares cross its path. This is a close-up moment with Cylindropuntia fulgida.

Stretching across the arid plains of the Sonoran Desert to parts of the Colorado Desert in South West USA, the Cylindropuntia fulgida grows wildly, stretching its roots to altitudes about 4000 ft above sea level. There are about 30 different species of cacti belonging to the genus Cylindropuntia, with the Fulgida being the most feared.

Jumping Cholla Cactus Cylindropuntia Fulgida
There are about 30 different species of cacti @labrujaitzel

Cylindropuntia Fulgida

The Cylindropuntia fulgida is an arborescent plant, meaning it takes the shape of a tree. It has a main cylindrical trunk that holds multiple, low drooping branches. It grows to a height between 6 and 15 ft tall (1.8 and 4.5 meters) and 8 ft (2.4 meters) in diameter, and the entire plant is covered in wart-like projections.

Instead of having leaves, the Cylindropuntia fulgida has 0.5 to 1-inch (1.27 to 2.54 cm) long spines coming out of areoles. There are about 6 to 12 spines in every areole, and the spines have a paper-thin sheath that reflects light, illuminating the plant in silver, gold, white, or tan hues. These spines have a double duty to the plant; to protect it from hungry herbivores and to act as a shield, preventing the plant from overheating in the desert sun.

Jumping Cholla Cactus

During February and March, Cylindropuntia fulgida blossoms yellow-green flowers at the edges of the branches. After each flowering season, the plant produces a red, pear-shaped fruit that looks wrinkled and is spotted with a few spines. These fruits have been lifesavers for bighorn sheep and certain deer species, especially during drought seasons.

The fruits grow off the same stalk every year, creating a hanging fruit chain that can get up to 2 feet (60.96 cm) long. This fruit string gives this plant the colloquial names Hanging Chain Cholla, Chain Fruit Cholla, Cholla Brincadora, Velas de Coyote, and Boxing Glove Cholla. This cactus is also known as Jumping Cholla Cactus from the ease at which the thorny stems break off or ‘jump’ on anything that passes by.

Jumping Cholla Cactus Cylindropuntia Fulgida
Jumping Cholla In The Desert

Spiky on the Outside, As Well as the Inside

As if the sharp spikes were not enough to dissuade you from going near the plant, the spikes of the Cylindropuntia fulgida are hollow and have barbs called glochids. When these indented spines attach themselves to any place or surface with moisture, for example, the skin, the glochids curve once they have made contact, interlocking their spines underneath the surface of the skin. Just the thought of it makes you want to wince in pain and agony.

A Challenger For Green Thumbs

As absolutely insane as this plant sounds, it can be the showstopper to break the usual garden plant monotony. The one thing that Cylindropuntia fulgida is picky about is the type of soil it grows in.

This cactus prefers soil with pH levels of between 6.0 and 7.5. Too much acidity or alkalinity in the soil will destroy the roots of the plant. The soil must also be well-draining, because like other succulents, the Cylindropuntia fulgida is very susceptible to root rot.

The Cylindropuntia fulgida is a hard-core, drought-resistant cactus that loves to spend at least 6 hours a day in direct sunlight. This water-once-and-forget-about-it plant does well with short, infrequent drinks of water during the summer and an occasional spritz during winter. When you want to get the best out of your Cylindropuntia fulgida, you could treat your plant to a granular fertilizer that is formulated for succulents and cacti, or good quality, water-soluble fertilizer.

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Next time you are roaming around the desert, keep your eye out for this spiky little creature because wherever it lands if there is moisture, it will immediately start to grow. As mother always said, be careful, don’t bring home strangers!

Thank you for reading! Be sure to check out similar articles from the cacti species like “Giant Barrel Cactus – Echinocactus Platyacanthus” or even “Mysterious Christmas Cactus – Schlumbergera Bridgesii“.

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read. 

Happy Planting! 🌵

Mysterious Christmas Cactus – Schlumbergera Bridgesii

Mysterious Christmas Cactus - Schlumbergera Bridgesii

You have to agree that this is an instant love at first sight for succulent lovers. However, its mystery is what attracts most of its lovers.

From botanists, gardeners, to the typical plant lovers (in this case succulent lovers), the mysterious Christmas cactus is fast becoming a household name. Its magical nature sells the plant as one of the most amazing succulents for home decor.

This is a detailed guide that unravels the mysteries of a real Christmas cactus. What is it like? Its origin, mysteries, how to get the best of it…. Much awaits you (like father Christmas candies) if you only keep on reading. 👇

Mysterious Christmas Cactus - Schlumbergera Bridgesii
The Mystery of Christmas Cactus @_mygreenworld

The Origin of Mysterious Christmas Cactus

The best way to unravel any mystery is to understand where it has its roots.

Schlumbergera bridgesii originates from the mighty Amazonian rain forests of Brazil. The holiday bloomer hails from the Zygocactus genus or Schlumbergera according to its name. The genus is home to only six species of which the bridgesii is one of them.

Thus absolute beauty was discovered in the mid-1800s by a scientist called Charles Lemaire. The plant has its name from the famous cacti collector from France, Frederic Schlumberger.

How Mysterious is The Christmas Cactus?

In its native home in Brazil, the plant is christened “Flor de Maio.” It is where it gains its fame to be a mystery for most of its growers, and it is all about the blooming time.

Most cacti lovers assume that Schlumbergera blooms during Christmas hence its name Christmas cactus. To your surprise, this is never the case. The Schlumbergera genus is made up of holiday bloomers. The most confusing bloom closer or during Christmas, Easter, and Thanksgiving holidays.

So after all, the Christmas cactus blooms during Christmas. Its siblings from the Schlumbergera family host its mystery.

Mysterious Christmas Cactus - Schlumbergera Bridgesii
A Cactus for Your Christmas @_mygreenworld

What Does the Mysterious Christmas Cactus Look Like?

To completely unravel the mystery, we need to understand the plant’s physical appearance. In the end, you will find that it is a beautiful house plant from its looks.

The hardest hurdle to getting the real color of any holiday bloomer is the amount of propagation that it undergoes. The six bloomers take several colors ranging from magenta, pink, to white, and even some are bicolor. It is unfair to mention that the plant is one of the easiest to propagate.

The Christmas cactus is leafless with flat, segmented and slightly spiked stems. You will find its beautiful flowers that are red, pink or white in most cases emanating from an areola on its stem.

To quickly tell the Christmas cactus from the rest of the holiday bloomers, take a closer look at its stems. They are less spiked.

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Blooming the Christmas Cactus

Well, there is more mystery to unraveled than what you already know about this fantastic cactus so far so good.

What Comes into Your Mind When You Hear of ‘Cactus’?

As most of us would have never imagined, the Christmas cactus has its origin in the Amazon, think of the biggest rivers, and the highest rainfall amounts. In short, no desert-like climates where you find the thorned cactus.

Mysterious Christmas Cactus - Schlumbergera Bridgesii
Bloom Your Christmas Cactus @hnevvv

Does this Affect How it Blooms? How do You Care For it for Those Scintillating Flowers to Burst Out?

  • Christmas is winter time(well, not everywhere on earth). Winter is cold and so does the Christmas cactus hate hot environments. Avoid exposing it to hot air or direct sunlight. Its beautiful foliage can quickly turn into an eyesore.
  • Keep the plant exposed to bright light (probably next to your window). However, remember not directly under the sun. You can get it near the north or west-facing window or easier done, get a light-diffusing semi-transparent curtain. drain
  • Unlike other cacti, maintain a humid environment for this zygocactus mystery. The optimum humidity levels range between 50-60%.
  • The Christmas cactus is a long-living plant which makes it a great gift to be passed from generation to generation. Do not commit a crime of killing this beauty by letting its roots swimming in too much water. They can easily rot. Go for pots and soils that drain the water optimally.
  • Fertilizers work magic when it comes to growing indoor bloomers. Consider applying some fertilizer to a 2-3 week old plant. The process can also be done up to four times annually with breaks smashed four weeks before its blooming period.
  • Water your plant at least weakly during winter and 2-3 times a week when its a hot and dry summer season. Check the soil water retention(with your hand) any time before watering and only water if the top layer is dry.
Mysterious Christmas Cactus - Schlumbergera Bridgesii
Beautiful Cacti Species @oneofthejessies

Can you confess your love for housing succulents? They are all juicy and beautiful to look at while adding more life to your interiors. But wait until you have your Christmas cactus. Christmas will never be Christmas again until you see the blossoms of a succulent queen.

Thank you for reading! Be sure to check out similar articles on the cacti species like “5 Dangers Of Overwatering A Cactus” or even “The Beautiful Blue Cacti—Pilosocereus“.

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If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Happy Planting! 🌵

The Moon Cactus (Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii)

Blooming Beauty Moon Cactus Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii

Moon cactus, also known as Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii or Hibotan cactus, is native to desert habitats in various parts of South America; Argentina to be precise. It belongs to the Gymnocalycium genus of globular cacti. These cacti are succulent plants that are very colorful but lack the necessary chlorophyll to produce plant sugars through photosynthesis. This makes the plants to be grafted onto a species that provides plenty of chlorophyll upon which the moon cactus can sustain itself for several years.

The blooming beauty of Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii plants is seen in its vibrant bright colors of brilliant orange, hot pink and an almost neon yellow. The lack of chlorophyll causes this color difference. They are small plants, generally a half-inch across. This makes it common for them to make lovely window boxes or southern exposure houseplants and be sold as gift plants.

Blooming Beauty Moon Cactus Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii
The Beauty of Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii @flowers.cactus

Moon Cactus Has The Following Characteristics:

  1. This plant grows as a globular mass, reaching about two inches in size.
  2.  It tends to produce offsets that grow around the base of the globe where the sides of the globular shape feature seams with prickly quills.
  3. It has a thick base that makes the perfect host for the moon cactus.
  4. Moon cactus is typically grafted to another cactus-like Hylocereus undatus commonly known as the dragon fruit cactus.
  5. This plant may produce flowers from the sides giving it a blooming beauty but does not produce a scent.

Just like other plants, some factors determine the growth of the moon cactus as seen below.

Light

Moon cactus does well in bright but indirect sunlight. Prolonged exposure to direct sunlight can be harmful to the plant. A covered porch that has some shade or an area where direct sunlight is blocked is the best environment for a moon cactus to grow. If the plant is indoors, set it near a window to give it plenty of sunlight. Note that, if the plant does not get enough bright light, the color starts to fade.

Temperature

Gymnocalycium mihanovichii grows well at average room temperature throughout the year. For your cactus to survive through a winter freeze, bring it indoors or in the garage where the temperature drops below 40 degrees. Alternatively, you can cover them up with a light blanket or sheet to shield them from cold weather. When exposed to hard elements during a hard winter, the moon cactus will freeze.

Water

Just like other succulent plants, moon cactus requires water. Water it regularly throughout the spring and summer months. During the winter months, water less frequently. Ensure the soil is dry before watering the plant. Make use of unglazed pots with numerous drainage holes to prevent standing water at the base of the pot, which further prevents the roots from rotting. Putting a thin layer of gravel at the bottom of your container before adding the moon cactus plant is advisable as it aids in water drainage.

For a more in-depth coverage of your cacti’s water needs check out: “How Often To Water A Cactus: Essential Guide”.

Soil

Moon cactus grows well in the regular commercial soil with good drainage. You can opt to use a mixture of pumice or perlite and regular potting soil. Though, we highly recommend this succulent and cacti soil from Hoffman. Our plants here at the office rated it with 5 stars! 

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Try making your own succulent soil at home by checking out “How to Make Your own Succulent Soil at Home“.

Blooming Beauty Moon Cactus Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii
Growth of Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii @plantvalley.shop

Glooming Maintenance & Propagation of Moon Cactus

To maintain the globular shape of the moon cactus, cut off the side shoots. When propagating, use the side shoots or the offsets growing from the plant. Use host plants for the side shoots like the Hylocereus undatus which offers a perfect base for them. Select host plants of the same thickness, height, and diameter.

Prepare the host plant before collecting the side shoots. Cutting at a slant, cut the top of the host plant, then carefully cut the side shoots from the mother plant. Press the two cut pieces together, setting the side shoot on the host plant. Press firmly but not too tight. Don’t allow the cuts of the host plant and the side shoots to dry before finishing the grafting process. To hold the two pieces together, secure the side shoots with a rubber band.

After several weeks, the side shoot should have started growing off the host plant. Remove the rubber band and follow the moon cactus care tips.

Be sure to check out our in-depth ebook on all things propagating. Don’t miss out on “The Right Way to Propagating Succulents Successfully” today!

Blooming Beauty Moon Cactus Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii
Maintenance & Propagation @little_gavin_cactus

Advantages of The Moon Cactus

Due to its fun appearance, it is made an excellent choice for any cactus or succulent garden. It is also seen great in window sills where it grows in a small pot.

The Shortcomings of The Moon Cactus

The major problem faced by the moon cactus is being infested with mealybugs and scales. You can deal with these infestations by use of tweezers, or cotton wool dipped in alcohol. If this does not curb the situation, use an insecticide as your last resort.

The other common problem is root rot which results from overwatering. Always be careful when watering your moon cactus. Want more info on root rot? Check out our piece “What is Root Rot & How Do You Fix it?” for more helpful info.

Blooming Beauty Moon Cactus Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii
The Moon Cactus @suzy2510

Despite these challenges, the moon cactus plant is easy to get, fun to own, and a colorful little plant to add to your collection. Besides, it has relatively low maintenance requirements.

Thank you for reading! Be sure to check out more pieces on the cacti species like “The Beautiful Blue Cacti—Pilosocereus” or even “Why Succulent Plants Are So Popular“.

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor” or even “Rare Succulents You Wish You Knew About” today! 

Happy Planting! 🌵

 

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Beautiful Easter Cactus – Hatiora Gaertneri

Beautiful Easter Cactus

Easter cactus which is also known as spring cactus is related to Christmas cactus. It is a species of the epiphytic plant in the Rhipsalidiae tribe, which is within the subfamily, Cactaceae. It is named so since it blossoms during the Easter holidays in the northern hemisphere. The beautiful succulent makes a lovely houseplant. Hatiora Gaertneri grows on trees or rocks only. When growing, it requires a regular amount of water for it to survive.

Beautiful Easter Cactus
Easter Cactus @brcuyanikvolkan

How to grow Hatiora Gaertneri

As a newbie gardener, you may wonder where to start for you to have this wonderful plant in your garden. Below are the guidelines on what to do and the conditions required to grow Hatiora Gaertneri.

Light

Hatiora Gaertneri does well in bright natural light. Don’t expose it to direct sunlight as this will burn the fleshy leaves of a spring cactus. When growing them outdoors, ensure they are under a bright shade. On the contrary, you can opt to grow them indoors and let the light penetrate through the open windows.

Water

Despite being in the cactus family, they differ from the desert cactus. They are epiphytic cacti, growing on other plants and rocks, not in soil. This gives them the need to breathe. Water your plant with plenty of water and let it drain thoroughly out of the pot. Before another watering session, make sure the plant has gone dry to avoid the roots rotting out due to constantly moist. The watering process is exercised until the plant blooms. At this particular period of blooming, water your plant more often since you don’t want it to go completely dry at this time.

To learn more, check out “How Often To Water a Cactus: Essential Guide”.

Soil

Hatiora Gaertneri requires rocky soil to grow well due to its nature of growth being on trees and rocks. You will need a mixture of soil to tree bark, perlite, or pumice in the ratio of 1:1. The use of pumice is the best. This soil should be neutral and well-drained. We highly recommend this soil by Hoffman! Our office plants love it!

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Temperature

Hatiora Gaertneri is tolerant of a wide range of temperatures. They do best in warmer temperatures. Ensure that you keep them away from any heaters and any cold drafts. To set the plants blooms, ensure the evening temperature is cool. This could be between 45-55 degrees. If you are in template climates, growing them outdoors is advisable.

Humidity

The Easter cactus requires a humid environment for it to survive. To stimulate the needed moisture, mist the plant daily with a sprayer, even during the resting period. Alternatively, you can place the plant on a saucer filled with pebbles and a little water. The air around the plant will be moistened through evaporation.

Fertilizing

Hatiora Gaertneri requires fertilization, preferably every 14 days. Use a balanced fertilizer and dilute it to half strength. Do not fertilize the plant during the resting period. You can also top-dress the plant with an organic granular fertilizer. They always respond with abundant growth during summertime when fed regularly despite them being moderate feeders. If you want a professional recommendation without the hassle of research, this batch by GrowBetter really does help our babies grow better!

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If you want a more in-depth look at succulent fertilizers, check out “5 Safest Fertilizers For Succulents”.

Propagation

Propagate any segment that is at least 3 inches long. This is done in late spring. Allow the cut surface to dry before being placed in slightly moist soil. For More tips and tricks on propagating succulents and cacti check out: “5 Tips for Propagating Succulents”.

Repotting

Once the flowering has finished, you can repot your plants. It is always important to use a well-drained potting mix with good air porosity preferably the ones used for any succulent or cactus.

Beautiful Easter Cactus
Cacti Family @jana_hylocereus

Getting the Hatiora Gaertneri to bloom

Having followed and maintained the points above, you should have a healthy green cactus. For you to accomplish flowers, you will be required to have a special set of conditions. The first thing to do is to stop feeding them. Secondly, move the plant to a place where it will have 12-14 hours of darkness. Ensure the temperatures are 10 degrees Celsius for the best bud set. Thirdly, water the plant sparingly from October to November. By the time it hits December, moves the plant to somewhere warmer with 16-18 degrees Celsius range. The plant will be ready to flower from February to March.

Challenges faced when growing Hatiora Gaertneri

Despite having followed the procedures for its growth, they are met by some challenges, one of being infested by insects.  Scale and mealybugs are the common insects that attack this plant. It usually occurs if the plant is indoors. To curb this, you can wipe the stems down with some alcohol. This will remove the insects and the honeydew they excrete- which can attract fungal spores and the dust that has accumulated. 

If the infestation becomes severe, take your plant outdoor and use insecticide made for succulent plants to treat it. Always follow the directions on the package for application.

Another great problem with this Easter cactus is the root and stem rot caused by a wet, heavy potting mix. To avoid this, you can use the special cactus soil available for use with succulents and cactus. Consider growing your plant in a clay pot which will provide a quicker dry down of the potting mix and better soil aeration. Also, the Easter cactus will fail to flower in the following year, if it is fertilized in the 30 days following blooming.

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Beautiful Easter Cactus
Hatiora Gaertneri @leaf_as_we_know_it

The next time you are interested in adding some springtime color to your home, be guaranteed to witness it by having this plant in your garden or in that corner of your house. It is easy to grow and brings that bliss in your home. Make your next Easter colorful with Hatiora Gaertneri.

Thank you for reading! If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Happy Planting! 🌵

All You Need to Know About Echeveria Lola

All You Need to Know About Echeveria Lola

There is simplicity, and complexity when it comes to keeping succulents. Simplicity comes in taking care of them, as they need less water and attention than other plants. Complexity is what any succulent gardener is faced with when it comes to choosing the perfect succulent. The variety of succulents available is astounding, and yet, there are some which are loved beyond reason. In the Echeveria variants, ‘Lola’ is a favorite. With a romantic and sensual name like Lola, it makes sense that so many would-be drawn to this stunning plant. Keeping one is like having an all-year-round stunning rose, with its evergreen, delicately arranged leaves. So, here is everything you need to know about Echeveria Lola.

All You Need to Know About Echeveria Lola
Sensual Name Such as Lola @forloveofsucculents

Introducing…Echeveria Lola

The Echeveria Lola is part of a family known as Crassulaceae, from Mexico or Central America. Where other succulents typically have green leaves, Echeveria Lola’s leaves are a delicate shade of light purple or may appear to be a mix of gray and blue hues. Her leaves grow in the shape of a rosette, with overlapping leaves that appear to grow out of a heart. Another element that adds to its beauty is the thick layer of epicuticular wax that is found on the leaves. This is known as farina and makes the plant look as though it is covered in translucent wax resembling alabaster.

Each year in the spring, the blooms from the Echeveria Lola shoot through. They are a bright shade of pink and yellow, and bell-shaped. Like other Echeveria plants, they stand out on a stalk that catches the eyes and taste buds of pollinating birds.

Taking Care of Your Echeveria Lola

Enjoy this succulent by growing it outdoors and give it the room to spread out to its full potential. Don’t worry, this plant is far from invasive so you will be able to control how stunning it is within your garden or indoors. Here are the best conditions to have when caring for this succulent.

All You Need to Know About Echeveria Lola
Take Care of Echeveria Lola @highway92succulents

Lighting

Echeveria Lola is such a pretty succulent that you may be tempted to have it inside, but this will affect how it grows. It thrives in full sunshine, though a little bit of shade would be good as well, especially in very hot climates. When positioned in a place where it does not get direct sunlight, the plant will not be able to photosynthesis. The sad result of this would be the death of the plant since it will not be able to generate the food that it needs. Keeping it indoors means that you must check a number of boxes when it comes to ‘living conditions’. Positioning the plant where it will receive the afternoon sun would be ideal.

Check out our Ebook on “Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth” to get our full inside look at which methods are best for lighting your succulents.

Ideal Climate

You will notice it getting bigger and healthier in the summer, as that is when its most active growth takes place. If you experience especially cold winters, where temperatures fall below 20 degrees Fahrenheit, you may need to move your plant indoors. Once there, invest in warming lamps so that your succulent does not die – cold is not Echeveria Lola’s friend.

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Did you know that some succulents prefer one climate over another? Check out “Summer & Winter Succulents: What’s the Difference?” for a list of succulents varying from season to season.

Watering the Echeveria Lola

Like other succulents, a little water goes a long way so only water it when the soil is completely dry. When watering, focus on soaking the soil and then letting it be till it is dry again. It can grow to fit a cupped hand, stretching up to 6” tall and up to 4” wide.  It is worth noting that this plant grows slowly, so you need not worry that the minimal water is affecting its overall growth. 

All You Need to Know About Echeveria Lola
Growth of Your Pretty Lola @jenssuccs

This plant will thrive in containers and also do well in rock gardens. You will need to keep an eye out for mealybugs, which are more likely to grow if you have too much water on your plants. They will pop up when there is water trapped between the leaves. If by any chance water splashes in between the leaves when watering, a small bud of cotton wool is all you need to soak up the excess water. With this in mind, the way that you water this succulent is also important. Avoid watering it from above, instead, water it from the ground level.

Propagating Echeveria Lola

Patience is what you need when propagating this succulent. It typically takes around twice as long as your average succulent and will only really work if you get it right from the get-go. Once you figure out how to make it work, you could have a while Echeveria Lola garden within just six months. Here are the steps that you should follow:

  1. Begin by taking off the leaf, something that you need to do slowly to twist off the entire leaf. For successful propagation, you need to make sure that no part of the lead is left behind on the stem.
  2. After removing the leaves, take around 48 hours before you place it back into potting soil (this is just one approach). During this time, it will develop a callous.
  3. The second approach after plucking off the leaf is to keep it under a bright light for the two-day period. Each day mist it a little and before long, a tiny succulent will start to grow. Nurse this little one until it gets a little bigger and has several leaves and then place it into a pot.
  4. You will also find little offsets after some time sprouting at the base of your plant. If outdoors, and with plenty of space, you can leave these to grow. Indoors, they are ideal to carefully cut and plant into their own pots.

Check out “5 Tips for Propagating Succulents” for more helpful tips on propagating your succulents at home.

All You Need to Know About Echeveria Lola
What You Need is Patience @dagtasmedrese

Repotting your Echeveria Lola

Once a year, transplant your succulent so that it can get rich nutrients from new potting soil to keep it going. This will especially help if you are keeping your Echeveria Lola indoors. The best time to repot your plant is in the spring, just before the growing season. When repotting, you need to carefully take the succulent out of the pot. Then, gently remove the old soil from the roots. If there are any roots that are dead, remove them. Place the succulent into a new pot with fresh potting soil, ensuring that the roots are well spread out. Do not water for around a week then water lightly. If your Echeveria Lola is growing outdoors, add a little bit of organic fertilizer and make sure that the soil is mixed up with some coarse sand for better drainage.

Tips for Care

Excellent care means that your succulent will thrive for years. Here are a few tips to make sure that happens.

  1. To maintain your succulent, stick to the basics. First, any dried or wilted leaves should carefully be picked off. This is one plant that does not need much in the way of pruning.
  2. If it naturally propagates and new plants begin to grow, you can carefully cut these off. Leave the tips to dry out for a day or two and then replant where desired.
  3. For even extra care of your plant, pay attention to the pH of the soil. Slightly acidic soil is best for this plant, and a pH of 6.0 is ideal.
  4. When keeping this plant indoors, it is best to grow it within a shallow clay pot that has excellent drainage. This will ensure that it thrives.

One key benefit to note is that Lola is non-toxic and safe if you have any animals so you can grow it anywhere. Therefore it is a great plant to have both indoors and outdoors. While non-toxic, it is not fit for consumption.

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Echeveria Lola Pests and Problems

Like many succulents, the quickest way to kill your plant mercilessly would be a heavy hand when it comes to water. These plants need very little water in order to survive. If you give them too much, they are prone to getting root rot which will kill the plant from the inside out. For that reason, excellent drainage is required. With pots, having holes at the bottom is ideal. When planting in your garden, mixing up the soil with some small rocks will help to improve the drainage and prevent the retention of too much water.

The main pest that affects these plants is mealy bugs. As has been noted, to keep these away, monitoring how you water the plant is your best bet. Keep it simple and focus on the base of the plant above all else. Lucky for you, we have a whole piece on how to handle mealy bugs as well. Check out “How to Get Rid of Mealybugs” for more.

All You Need to Know About Echeveria Lola
Pests & Problems of Echeveria Lola @thegirlunsure.gardens

There are plenty of succulent nurseries that have the Echeveria Lola available for purchase. Should you be looking for a more convenient option, you can purchase this plant online through Amazon, Succulents Box as well as Etsy. Garden centers will also have this plant available for purchase.

Grow a Lola and brighten up your succulent garden, wherever it may be. With its ability to thrive in even the driest conditions, this is one plant that will retain its beauty for the long haul. Let us know in the comments below if you have the Echeveria Lola already planted in your succulent garden.

Enjoyed learning about “All You Need to Know About Echeveria Lola”? If so, you’ll really enjoy our ebook about “Rare Succulents You Wish You Knew About“. With this ebook, you can find out about other succulents like this one that will captivate your eye! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents. 

Happy planting! 🌵

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