6 Best Indoor Succulents And Everything You Need To Know

6 Best Succulents for Indoor Gardens

When it comes to being a plant parent, succulents are easy fan favorites. Most types of succulents are easy to take care of, requiring relatively little attention compared to flowers and other houseplants.

And though succulents are a great, low-maintenance way to bring some green life into your home, some species of succulents are rather fussy when it comes to the amount of sunlight and temperatures they need to survive, while others can’t deal with the dry air that comes with being indoors.

Worse, some succulents are even known to be toxic to animals, so even though they might thrive in indoor environments, they might not be the best roommates for your furry friends.

Luckily, some succulents were seemingly made to sit atop your mantle without posing any threats to your animals or needing much effort when it comes to their watering schedules and positioning in the sun. Check out the best indoor succulents to add to your collection.

1. Burro’s Tail (Sedum morganianum)

Hanging Burros Tail Succulent Plant
Burro’s Tail Succulent Image: @plant.heart.city

The Burro’s Tail succulent is unlike the short, stubby plants you might picture when you hear the word “succulent.” As it ages, it gets pretty leggy, making it a great hanging plant as opposed to one you might place on a table or mantle. Even so, the Burro’s Tail thrives indoors where temperatures remain around the 70s. According to Nell at Joy Us Garden, a Burro’s Tail does need at least 4 hours of sun a day, but a bright shade or a partial sun will do. Plus, the ASPCA reports that this succulent won’t do your pets any harm.

We have an article you can check out here all about Burro’s Tail.

2. Haworthia

Potted Haworthia Succulent Plant in Bucket Planter
Haworthia Image: @hinterland_plants

According to Baylor Chapman, author and founder of florist company Lila B. Design, Haworthias are “tough, tough, tough” — in a good way, of course. According to Our House Plants, Haworthias can survive through just about anything, and even tolerate periods of neglect pretty well (meaning you can go on vacation without checking in to make sure your friends remember to come over and care for it). They do best without a lot of direct sunlight and are perfectly fine in average temperatures.

At only around three to five inches tall, the small plant can pretty much go anywhere in your house without having to be repotted. And though its relative, Aloe Vera, is very poisonous to both humans and animals if ingested, the Haworthia is a safe indoor companion.

Check out our article about this interesting Zebra Plant – Haworthia Fasciata!

3. Copper Spoons (Kalanchoe orgyalis)

Copper Spoons Succulent Plant
Copper Spoons Succulent Image: @ecophilia

What sets this taller, tree-like plant apart from other succulents is its velvety copper leaves. It has a high heat-tolerance, so you can place it in those full-sun spots in your house that many other plants can’t handle. Plus, “it’s indestructible!” Flora Grubb Gardens garden designer Daniel Nolan told Sunset. “You can go on vacation for a month and not kill it.” Though Copper Spoons can apparently get up to a meter tall, they’re slow growers and when grown indoors, remain relatively small.

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4. Echeveria

Echeveria Succulent Plant Close Up
Echeveria Succulent Plant Image: @erikassucculents

According to Certified Urban Agriculturalist Bonnie L. Grant, “Echeveria care is practically foolproof.” It doesn’t get much better than that! Youngs Garden Shop explains that these succulents prefer placement in bright filtered light, such as natural sunlight through a window, and urges keeping it in that same spot as “dramatic changes in lighting can stress plants out.” They don’t need any fertilizer and you only have to water them once the soil is dry, so your life with an Echeveria will be pretty stress-free!

5. Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

Ponytail Palm Succulent Plant
Ponytail Palm Image: @jensjunglelife

If you love the look of palm trees but don’t live in the right climate, consider a Ponytail Palm. Though they are a type of succulent, their long leaves and thin trunk are deceiving! Like palm trees, Ponytails do best in full sun but are capable of surviving in lower light as well — it just might not get as large. Though Ponytails can reach about eight feet tall fully grown, they don’t need to be repotted and don’t require much watering.

6. Air Plant

Hanging Air Succulent Plant
Air Succulent Plant Image: @botanicalware

For those who can’t stand the thought of having to clean up any stray clumps of dirt in the house, you’re gonna love this: Air Plants can grow without soil. Seriously! According to Nell at Joy Us Garden, these special succulents grow by attaching themselves to other plants (but don’t worry — they’re not parasitic). They thrive in bright, indirect light, and as for temps, they like it pretty close to the same way we all do — below 90 and above freezing. Simple.

When it comes to watering, Air Plants do differ a bit from your typical succulents. You can easily spray them with water from a spray bottle, which you should do about one to two times a week, depending on how dry or humid the air in your house is. “But what they really like is to be soaked,” according to Nell from Joy Us Garden, a process that will keep your Air Plant happy for as long as two weeks. “The best way to water an air plant is to submerge it in a dish of water for 12 hours,” according to HGTV. “Air plants only take up as much water as they need, so you won’t overwater by doing this.”


Did you enjoy reading this post? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Last update on 2021-10-07 / Amazon

7 Best Succulents for Beginners

7 Best Succulents for Beginners

There are two types of people in this world: those who have that “green thumb” and can manage to make even typical garden weeds look like intricate floral arrangements and those whose homes are basically planted cemeteries.

I’m definitely of the latter persuasion, which I learned when I somehow managed to completely botch my first foray into succulent parenthood (it turns out that, while succulents are just about the easiest, most low-maintenance plants there are, they still do need some water and sunlight).

To be fair, I wasn’t really aware that there are many, many different types of succulents (something I probably could’ve found out with a simple Google search, but I digress) — including those that are perfect for people still working on turning that thumb green.

The best succulents for beginners have a few things in common.

For one, they require very little vigilance. Maybe you’re looking to bring a little life into your house without also having to worry too much about actually keeping it alive with a precise watering schedule. Secondly, they can survive in just about any climate. And, of course, they look gorgeous, bringing a modern feel to your space without needing any kind of special arrangement expertise.

So if you’re wondering where to begin, here are a few ideas to lead you in the right direction.

ALSO READ:

1. Golden Barrel Cactus (Echinocactus grusonii)

Golden Barrel Cactus and Picture Frames
Golden Barrel Cactus Image: @flowersbyren_

Affectionately (and hilariously) known as the “mother-in-law’s cushion,” the Golden Barrel Cactus is one of the best succulents for beginners because it’s very drought-tolerant and doesn’t require much attention to do its thing. According to House Plants Expert, this cactus thrives indoors as long as it has enough sunshine. In the warmer months, you’ll need to water it when its soil starts drying out, but in the winter you’ll find you barely have to water it at all.

They grow fast, so you will have to repot it when it’s young. In fact, Tom Jesch from Altman Plants explained in a YouTube video that they can get up to 400 pounds in the wild. Assuming you don’t have that much room for a succulent, you don’t have to worry all that much about a giant cactus taking over your home. The growth rate slows down as it ages, and takes about 10 years to reach a full 10 inches across, so you’d have to have it for a while before it got that big.

2. Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera in White Potted Planter
Aloe Vera Image: @aloegal604

Not only is Aloe Vera the perfect succulent for people prone to getting sunburn, but it’s also a pretty easy plant to take care of. They thrive indoors and don’t need much sunlight — according to the Farmer’s Almanac, indirect sunlight or even artificial light will do. Best of all, you only have to remember to water it every three weeks. As Nell from Joy Us Garden wrote, “easy does it” when it comes to watering an aloe plant.

3. Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)

Sago Palm Succulent Next to Blonde Female
Sago Palm Image: @monicaraymondlynch

You can grow the versatile Sago Palm indoors or outdoors, and it can even survive in temperatures below zero. While young plants require a little more attention (they’ll need watering once a week or so, according to the San Francisco Chronicle), as they mature you’ll only need to water it when the soil dries out. The Sago Palms are also incredibly resistant when it comes to pests, which means you don’t have to worry about it falling victim to any mites hanging around your house.

4. Zebra Haworthia (Haworthia fasciata)

Two Zebra Haworthia Succulents in Blue & Tan Planters
Zebra Haworthia Image: @stayinalivesucculents

This gorgeous “zebra plant” looks a lot like Aloe Vera, but you’ll be able to tell it apart from the healing plant thanks to its white stripes. Like Aloe, Haworthia succulents don’t need direct sunlight or much water, making them a great addition to the home of someone missing that green thumb. These particular succulents also tell you when they need watering — well, sort of. According to Vegged Out, a Haworthia’s leaves are a good indicator of whether or not they need a drink, taking a lot of the guesswork out of caring for your plant.

5. Echeveria

Echeveria Succulent in Tiny Planter
Echeveria Image: @hollyoftherain

According to Certified Urban Agriculturalist Bonnie L. Grant, Echeveria succulents were basically made for people without much succulent know-how. “The Echeveria succulent plant is just such a specimen, thriving on brief periods of neglect and low water and nutrients,” she wrote for Gardening Know How. “Echeveria care is practically foolproof and grows well in either containers or toasty garden beds.” Sold.

6. Panda Plant (Kalanchoe tomentosa)

Panda Plant Succulent Close Up
Panda Plant Image: @jialailai

Panda Plants have a cool name and even cooler leaves, which have a velvet look to them and are soft to the touch. While they need a good amount of (indirect) sunlight, they’re pretty forgiving when it comes to watering. They typically store water in those fuzzy leaves of theirs which lets you get away with forgetting a watering cycle every once in a while.

7. Living Stones (Lithops)

Living Stones Succulent in Planter Held in Hand
Living Stones Image: @jardines_flora

Living Stones might not be the prettiest succulents on the list, but hey — they’re easy to care for, and that’s what’s important, right? While you may not want these as standalone plants, they’re cute little additions to terrariums that look like you made a lot of effort when really, they’re good at taking care of themselves.

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

12 Stunning Minimalist Succulent Planters

12 Stunning Minimalist Succulent Planters

Minimalist designs have become increasingly trendy in recent years, and no plants are more minimalist in nature than succulents.

Homes with minimalist aesthetics are free of clutter and have simple color schemes. They’re open and airy with simple black and white tones.

Like minimalist homes, succulents are rather minimalist plants that require little work. Many of them are small with muted tones and their looks aren’t overbearing, making them perfect accent pieces to other simple decors.

Of course, no matter what types of succulents you prefer, they need a home of their own. Check out these stunning minimalist succulent planters that’ll flawlessly match your aesthetic.

Succulent Pots, ZOUTOG White Mini 3.15 inch Ceramic Flower...
11" Plant pots self-Watering Succulent pots – Easy Succulent...
Succulent Pots 6 Pack, Laerjin 3 Inch Succulent Planters with...
Succulent Pots, ZOUTOG White Mini 3.15 inch Ceramic Flower...
11" Plant pots self-Watering Succulent pots – Easy Succulent...
Succulent Pots 6 Pack, Laerjin 3 Inch Succulent Planters with...

Last update on 2021-10-07 / Amazon

1. Mid-Century Modern Planter

These planters are just about as simple and clean as it gets! Coming in two sizes, these simple ceramic planters are the perfect addition to your home. Plus, the wooden stand adds a splash of tasteful color.

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10/21/2021 05:29 pm GMT

2. Round Planter Bowl with Wood Stand

In a similar fashion, this planter bowl replicates the mid-century modern look, wooden stand, and all. However, it’s ideal for those looking for more of a centerpiece than a single planter. The large 10-inch wide bowl is ideal for holding many different types of succulents at once.

 

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10/21/2021 06:55 pm GMT

3. Two-Toned Textured Planter

If you’re looking for a little texture, these stone planters bring the quirk. At 3 inches deep they’re great for those small desktop succulents. And though they have some color (these planters come in green and beige), the colors are muted enough to blend in seamlessly with their simple, minimalist surroundings.

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4. Ceramic Cone-Shaped Planter with Brass Stand

Into the texture but not quite the colors? Go a bit simpler with this textured, cone-shaped planter. The small brass stand adds a modern feel to the otherwise super minimalist design.

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10/22/2021 02:54 am GMT

5. Ceramic Glaze Planter

At only about 2×2 inches, these cute planters are minimalistic by nature. The ceramic planters come in five different glazes, but the colors are soft enough so that they’ll complement any room in your house instead of overtaking it.

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10/22/2021 04:10 am GMT

6. Ceramic Hexagon Planter

If you’re trying to keep it super simple, these small ceramic planters are exactly what you’re looking for. The included bamboo trays (along with your beautiful succulents, of course!) add just a tiny pop of color to the otherwise clean design.

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10/21/2021 11:10 pm GMT

7. Brass and Glass Geometric Terrarium

The only thing more minimalistic than all white? All glass! This terrarium allows you to check out your succulents from all angles. Plus, the brass edges add just the right amount of oomph.

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10/21/2021 04:19 pm GMT

8. Geometric Hanging Planter

Are your walls looking a little bare? Instead of putting up another photo or painting, why not hang these geometric planters. Fill them with succulents like air plants for a simple, easy-to-maintain look. Or, for a more dramatic addition, the draping burro’s tail succulent would look absolutely stunning in these wall planters.

Our Pick
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10/22/2021 04:29 am GMT

9. Unglazed Cement Planter

For a truly earthy look, these unglazed cement planters are the way to go. Nothing is more minimalist than pure cement. Plus, it’s really making a design comeback, so you’ll be right on trend with this decor.

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10/22/2021 05:39 am GMT

10. Set of 3 Cement Planters with Wood Stand

If you’re into the cement look, this set of three succulent planters complete with matching wood stand will help bring succulent plant life into your home. Simple yet attractive, this set will help keep your succulents organized in style.

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11. Concrete Skull Planter

You can go minimalist while still adding a bit of flair. These cute cement skull planters bring some unexpected life (or death?) to your aesthetic. Plant your succulent and you have yourself a minimalist chia pet.

Concrete Skull Planter | Succulent City
24.95

Hand-poured concrete skull planter, great for any small cacti or succulent. These pieces sit about 5 inches tall, and have a small drainage hole.

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12. White Matte Ceramic Planter

There’s no denying that at its core, minimalist design favors black and white tones. Go back to basics with these simple, white matte planters. The geometric design comes in a few different shapes — and you get all six!

Our Pick
OAMCEG 2.75 inch White Ceramic Succulent Planter, Set of 6
$13.68

BEAUTIFUL, STYLISH MINI SUCCULENT POTS - Set of 6 White Ceramic plant pots, features a drainage hole and bamboo tray at the bottom for proper draining of live plants.


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Did any of these planters spark your interest, and now you’re ready to buy every single succulent to fill them? We have a solution for you! Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today!

Check out our article on the 6 Best Marble Planters for Succulents if you want some more inspiration! And to help you decide which succulents would look fabulous in your new planters, check out our additional articles on 7 Best Succulents for Low Light Environments, 5 Succulents with Red Flowers, or Everything About Dolphin Succulents.

Thanks for reading and learning with us. If you have any other awe-worthy planters that you’d love to share, head over to our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plant Lounge, and display them!

If you’d like this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

Happy planting! ?

Best Soil for Succulents

The Best Soil for Succulent Plants

Good soil accomplishes 3 things for a succulent:

  1. It provides nutrients, mostly in the form of nitrogen and phosphorous (N and P).
  2. It provides anchorage. The roots need soil with substance to be able to dig in and get a grip for stability.
  3. It absorbs and makes moisture available to the plant. Different soil types hold water for different lengths of time.
Hoffman 10404 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 4 Quarts,...
Organic Succulent and Cactus Potting Soil Mix Fast Draining...
Organic Succulents & Cactus Soil Mix, Professional Potting Soil,...
Hoffman 10404 Organic Cactus and Succulent Soil Mix, 4 Quarts,...
Organic Succulent and Cactus Potting Soil Mix Fast Draining...
Organic Succulents & Cactus Soil Mix, Professional Potting Soil,...

Last update on 2021-10-22 / Amazon

What Makes a Good Soil for Succulents?

When we’re selecting the best soil for succulents, our primary focus is to make sure it has good drainage. That means we’re focused on the ‘moisture’ part of that list above.

First of all – what is soil drainage? Simply put, it’s how fast water leaves the soil. After you water a plant, some of that water should come out of the bottom of the pot, but most of it will stay in the soil. That water either has to be taken up by the plant or evaporated into the air.

As it turns out, succulents and cacti require different soil than regular houseplants. Most houseplants are tropical plants. They’re originally from a place that probably has lots of rain and ambient humidity. Their soil is also naturally rich in nutrients because of other decomposing plants enriching the soil.

Succulents, on the other hand, come from deserts or other arid (dry) regions that generally have little rain and poor soil quality. The dirt there is probably coarse and gritty and lacks nutrients.

Obviously, it’s usually best to recreate their natural conditions as closely as possible. You might be surprised, however, that the most important thing to copy isn’t the number of nutrients they get – it’s the amount of water.

Succulent soil mix
@allpowerfulmomma

Soil composition is important

In essence, the soil is made up of two things – organic matter and inorganic matter. (Actually, you could argue that everything in the universe is made up of those two things).

Organic matter in this context means stuff that was once alive but is now dead. It can be in various stages of decomposition, or just regular dead. Some examples are:

  • Compost
  • Peat or sphagnum moss
  • Manure
  • Decomposing plants or animals
  • Coconut coir
  • Leaf or bark shreds

Inorganic matter, then, is everything that was never alive. In the case of dirt, it really just means minerals. Dirt is mostly made out of varying ratios of clay, silt, and sand.

Add organic and inorganic matter together and you’ve got soil.

The more organic matter that’s in the soil, the more water it holds. See what I’m getting at here? More organic matter means less drainage (and wetter soil). It follows that succulents prefer soil that has very little organic matter.

How do you know if the drainage is adequate?

So, we know what soil drainage is and we know how to get it. But how much drainage is enough?

As a rule of thumb, your succulent soil should be dry within 1 to 1.5 days of watering. And I mean dry. Bone dry.

There’s a quick way to test how dry the soil is. Stick your finger in the pot an inch or two into the soil. It should feel not only dry, but also warm. If it feels “cool” at all, it’s probably actually slightly damp and you’re misinterpreting the sensation. If your succulent has filled out the pot, it can be hard to check soil dampness and the mass of roots could use more room. You may need to consider repotting your succulent.

@succulent__lover

Most soil is bad soil

We’ve been talking about how bad wet soil is for succulents, but we haven’t even mentioned why that is. Well, here’s the answer.

Wet soil can cause root rot. Read all the common ways a succulent can die so that you can prevent this from happening.

This is a risk for all plants, but it’s especially dangerous for succulents. They aren’t accustomed to being wet for extended periods of time. In their natural habitat, water is wicked away by the dry soil and hot air very quickly.

Root rot is a particularly interesting disease. It may surprise you to learn that plants breathe mostly through their roots – not their leaves. They take in both carbon dioxide and oxygen (yes, they need oxygen too) that is present in the soil.

That’s why people are always talking about loose, aerated soil and how great it is. It’s also why worms are great for gardens – they break up the soil and create tunnels for air to reach the roots.

When soil is wet, however, air can’t move through it (duh). The plant has to “hold its breath” until the soil dries out again and it can breathe. If it takes too long, the root will drown and begin to rot. Succulents didn’t have to deal with long periods of wetness in their environment so they drown quickly.

Choosing the Right Soil for Succulents

Succulent soil potting mix
@succulent.yinn

That may sound dire, but it’s really not that hard to choose good soils for succulents. Just minimize the amount of organic matter and use those good watering practices we discussed.

Every succulent species has its own particular needs and wants, but 99% of them are cool with pretty much the same dirt. Just to be sure, watch how a plant reacts after being put in new soil and adjust your care accordingly.

How to make your own succulent soil

You can make your own succulent soil pretty easily; you probably already have everything you need at home. Here’s our recipe:

  • 2 parts potting soil. You can use any old dirt you have around. I like to use the Miracle Gro Succulent and Cacti mix. By itself, it’s not the best succulent potting mix (since the potting mix inexplicably contains a lot of organic matter like peat moss), but it does make a great base for mixing your own potting soil. Try to stay away from using dirt that is made of compost when making the potting mix.
  • 1 part perlite. This is the not-so-secret ingredient of great succulent soil mixes. Perlite is actually a type of volcanic glass that is “puffed” using extreme heat, just like Rice Krispies (seriously). Perlite is useful because it is a large particle with air pockets in it so it keeps the soil loose, promotes soil drainage, and helps with airflow.
  • 1 part grit. “Grit” is just any large inorganic particle, ideally of varying sizes. Grit does much the same thing that perlite does (and perlite is a kind of grit). Some examples include large sand particles such as construction sand, small gravel or rocks, or chicken grit.

That’s what we use to get all these nice plants you see here on Succulent City, but feel free to experiment.

Our Pick
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10/22/2021 07:54 am GMT
Our Pick
Organic Perlite by Perfect Plants
$13.99

Best for plants grown in containers — mix with potting mix for best results. Porosity of perlite prevents soil from compacting. Creates space for roots to expand.

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10/22/2021 01:54 am GMT

Best commercial succulent soils

If you don’t feel like getting your hands dirty and mixing your own soil, there are a couple really great succulent and cacti mixes that are commercially available.

Black Gold Cactus Mix by Sun Gro Horticulture is the gold standard of succulent soils. It’s pretty incredible how well-balanced it is – there’s just enough organic material to fertilize the plant and plenty of inorganic stuff to balance it out and have excellent drainage. You can’t go wrong using this mix.

Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Gritty Mix is another fan favourite, but a little different. It’s a “gritty mix” which means it has virtually no organic matter and retains zero water. It’s technically not even soil. It’s awesome for succulents, especially the picky ones, but you need to adapt your watering a little to accommodate a mix that holds literally not much water. Recommended for moderate to advanced growers.

Our Pick
Sun GRO Horticulture Black Gold Cactus Mix
$29.82

Sun GRO "Black Gold Cactus Mix" has been specifically blended to suit the unique growing needs of all cactus and succulents.


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10/21/2021 06:49 pm GMT
Our Pick
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10/22/2021 01:04 am GMT

BE SURE TO ALSO READ:

Newly Published Ebook: The Best Soil Recommendations for Your Succulent


That’s just about everything you need to know about soil and how it relates to succulents and cacti! Do you need any clarification or have any questions? Do you have a soil recipe you want to share? Let us know in the comments below!

If you liked this read you’re going to love our full in-depth ebooks! With so many of our succulent lovers asking for more, we listened and can’t wait to share it with you here! With our very detailed ebooks, you’ll get more information than these short articles, some ebooks are 30+ pages, perfect for a weekend read.

8 Best Indoor Cacti You Need to Have

Best indoor cacti

Mini succulents and other conventional houseplants are in for a big competition. Cacti décor designs are springing up from every corner of the internet and boy, don’t they just look gorgeous!

Taming these desert survivors may seem hard, but not to cacti connoisseurs. Nothing beats the unique rustic look exuded by cacti. With their spiny texture and varied shapes, you’d be forgiven to think they’re living sculptures.

And no, they don’t need to be watched closely. Cacti actually thrive on neglect. (Yes, deprive them and they’ll still grow). Love them too much and you’ll soon be burying lots of them.

This is good news to beginner gardeners, busy plant lovers or brown thumbs who are looking for some bragging rights. Whichever category you fall into, cacti got you covered, talk about independence! If you’re a brown thumb, be sure to join our Succulent Plant Lounge, a lot of the members here converse and help each other out, it’s a great community to be in for succulents.

Sold on getting one of these alien-looking plants for your living room? Picking just any variety for your indoor needs may not be a good idea. Certain cacti varieties are just not meant to be tamed. Be that as it may, there are cacti species that thrive indoors and may even reward you with spectacular blooms.

Ready to explore? Let’s do this!

Bishop’s Cap— Astrophytum Myriostigma

Bishop’s Cap Astrophytum Myriostigma
@lilliocactus

Native to the Chihuahuan desert of Mexico, the Bishop’s Cap cacti is the most popular species in the genus Astrophytum. Its appearance resembles a star-shaped globe with equally divided segments. This hardy plant is usually green in color while young but as it matures, it’s covered by a grayish coating of fine scales to protect it from sunburn.

Tiny spines are lined on the ribs that separate the plant’s segments giving it a distinctive look. Take good care of it and it’ll give you brilliant yellow blooms during spring. Feeding it some fertilizer from time to time will do just that, any highly rated fertilizer for cacti like this will work just fine.

These dainty flowers appear at the center top of the plant where the ridges that separate the different segments converge.

Also known as the Monk’s Hood, taking care of the Bishop’s Cap is an easy ride. They can thrive in light shade but require sunlight for at least three hours a day. They can do well in a window sill on a south or west-facing window. Subject them to plenty of sun if you want to see the blooms.

We think a great window sill planter like this modern white one will look wonderful with the Bishop’s Cap cactus.

Astrophytum myriostigma prefers quick-draining soil so avoid your regular gardening mix. Water infrequently as too much water will lead to an early grave. You may feed them diluted fertilizer once a month during their growing season. Propagation is mainly done through seeds.

Barrel Cactus— Ferrocactus Species

Barrel Cactus Ferrocactus Species
@cactusmagazine

Arrayed with ferocious spines, this quirky cactus makes a perfect complement to your existing interiorscape. As the name suggests, the barrel cactus is spherical with long spines on its ribs. The spikes act as protection to the juicy, edible pulp located on the inside.

The barrel cactus has a long life span and may live for a couple of decades. Its size varies depending on the species. Some are squat while others may be as tall as 10 feet. (Now that’s one tall and spiky plant!)

This cactus is a true sun lover and prefers full sun for a few hours a day. Setting it beside a large uncovered window will ensure it gets plenty of sun for optimum growth. Water sparingly, and do so after the soil has completely dried out. Use commercial cacti mix to prevent damp soil-related problems like root rot and fungi.

If you find yourself in a situation where you have to handle the barrel cactus with your bare hands, don’t. Be safe with cut resistant gloves so that the sharp spines won’t make a dent in your flesh.

Old Lady Cactus— Mammilaria Hahniana

Old Lady Cactus Mammilaria Hahniana
@succulents_4ever

Native to the Guanajuato state of Mexico, this cactus is tall growing reaching a height of 10 inches. Mammilaria hahniana is commonly referred to as the old lady cactus due to its white hair covering on the entire plant. The white hairs and spine also serve to protect the plant from the intense sun.

The old lady cactus blooms in spring and summer producing attractive purple flowers that may even grow in a ring on the plant’s apex.

Use well-draining cacti mix while potting this plant as they hate sitting in damp soil. Water once a week during the hot season and once a month during winter. Mammilaria hahniana will readily bloom in bright sunlight.

Learn more about this succulent here!

Angel Wings Cactus— Opuntia Albispina

Angel Wings Cactus Opuntia Albispina
@succulentsforhaiti

Also known as bunny ears, the angel wings cactus is a desert denizen, highly adapted to small amounts of water and extensive heat. It has a striking appearance with its flat pads endowed with glochids –a fancy term for the white prickles you see on its surface.

Unlike most cacti, it lacks spines as these are replaced with clusters of hair on the surface of the pads. Careful though, these glochids can still injure you so take care while handling it.

Opuntia albispina is a summer bloomer producing creamy yellow flowers with globular edible fruits that are purple in color. Provide it with lots of light, quick-draining soil, and infrequent watering and you’ll have one happy angel wing cactus.

Christmas Cactus— Schlumbergera Bridgessii

Christmas Cactus— Schlumbergera Bridgessii
@smartplantapp

Well, if you can’t pronounce the complex scientific name, don’t worry. You can also call it the thanksgiving cactus. Unlike most cacti, the Christmas cactus is spineless, characterized by its serrated green leaves.

This Brazilian cactus blooms in winter, producing showy tubular flowers in shades of purple, pink, red, and pink.

Keep your Christmas cactus in shaded light with a few hours in direct bright sunlight. Exposing this attractive indoor cactus in the hot sun will lead to sunburn. This plant is native to the tropical forests of Brazil and so it needs more water than other cacti. Thus, water frequently during its growing seasons but be careful to let the water drain out. If you’re wondering, propagation is also possible via cuttings.

Learn more about the beautiful Christmas cactus here.

Saguaro Cactus— Carnegiea Gigantean

Saguaro Cactus— Carnegiea Gigantean
@usmcwayne

Native to the Sonoran Desert of Mexico, the Saguaro cactus is a slow-growing and long-lived plant that can live up to two centuries. Its scientific name, Carnegiea Gigantean means gigantic candle. And quite rightly so! This cactus can grow up to 40 feet in height.

Saguaros are barrel-shaped with water storing capacity in the external pleats. It is hard on blooming and may take over 35 years for flowers to appear.

Carnegiea prefers bright sunlight. Water only once a month and cut back on watering during winter and other cool seasons. Let the soil be grainy and quickly draining for optimum growth.

Rat Tail Cactus— Aporocactus Flagelliformis

Rat Tail Cactus— Aporocactus Flagelliformis
@ropeandroot

Can you throw a guess of the native home of this beauty? That’s right! The magnificent Mexico –home to almost all cacti.

If rats annoy you, well hopefully not this quirky rat tail cactus. With its trailing stems covered with fine spines, it’s definitely the perfect plant to set up on a hanging basket. The rat tail cactus thrives on bright sunlight and if everything goes well, they may bloom in spring bringing forth spectacular pink flowers.

Water as you would any cactus, making sure not to overwater the plant. A well-draining commercial cacti mix is recommended to prevent root rot. You can share the rat tail cactus with friends through cuttings. More the merrier! If you have some to give away, why not lend some to our members at Succulent Plant Lounge?

Be sure to check out “The Rat Tail Cactus: Everything You Need To Know

Star Cactus— Astrophytum Asteria

Star Cactus Astrophytum Asteria
@lert_cactus

It’s a short, plump and round plant with approximately eight ribs each arrayed with woolly areoles. Also known as the sand dollar cactus or sea urchin cactus, Astrophytum asteria is generally green in color covered with decorative white dots.

When conditions are right, the star cactus blooms during spring, producing alluring yellow flowers having orange shades at the center. The fruits are pink, gray, or reddish, with woolly hair covering them.

Taking care of Astrophytum asteria is quite a breeze. Use grainy cacti mix that’s well-draining and water them twice a month. Ensure the soil dries out completely before in between watering. These sun lovers prefer bright light so get them the south or west-facing window for healthy growth.

If you’re looking for a more in-depth guide of this fantastic cactus, check this out!

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Have enough of the cacti yet? If you get any particular cactus please let us know and if you want us to write a full in-depth article on how to take care of one of these cacti, don’t be afraid to comment it below.

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