Where to Buy Air Plants; Both Online And Offline Joints/Buyers Reviews

Where to Buy Air Plants

Are you looking to acquire your first air plant or two? Or maybe you just want to add variety to your already existing collection and garden?

You just landed at the right place.

Below, you’ll get to know multiple ways through which you can purchase air plants to spruce up your home decor efforts. And maybe get the compliments your air plants and home deserve!

The options here offer a wide range of flexibility in terms of budget and the specific varieties you wish to have – so you’re free to shop around for your ultimate fit.

Where to buy air plants
striking photo of air plant @nakajinaka7

Where to Buy Air Plants Online

It is safe to say you can buy anything online these days, including air plants. With online air plant stores, you get a whole lot of advantages that add more fun to your air plants adventure.

You get to sample (and maybe buy) a wide range of species, land some massive discounts on select purchases and lots of options for the same plant – like price, shipping, and so on.

See for yourself below!

Air Plant City

Air Plant City boasts of more than a decade’s existence in the air plants sphere. So it’s a safe bet that they know quite beneficial information as far as these plants are concerned which is huge for you as a buyer.

Aside from that, they have lots of discounted prices on select plants – up to 70% off! That’s definitely a steal considering the experience above.

Need to make a bulk purchase? They offer wholesale options for anyone looking to grab as many plants as possible. On top of that, they offer great air plants combinations if you wish to go that direction.

Too bad it’s not just the plants. They also provide great offers on rustic wood displays ranging from Mopani, grapevine, and driftwood.

All purchases above $60 are eligible for free shipping too, how awesome!

If you would like to create a driftwood planter at home, check this out.

Where to buy air plants
exotic air plant @exotictropicals

Air Plant Shop

This is another great stop for both air plant collections and displays. It offers great bargains on your favorite pickings with discounts also going all the way to 70% off. Do you want to order large quantities for your event, wedding, or retail store?  Then their wholesale package is just the option for you.

What’s more, they offer a 30-day guarantee on all purchases so you’re sure to get sorted if the deliverables don’t turn out as you expected. Just as with Air Plant City, they also offer free shipping as long as your cart has purchases worth $60 or more.

Away from just beautifying your home, purchasing air plants at Air Plant Shop gives you an opportunity to impacting the lives of school-going kids supported by this store in Guatemala.

where you can buy air plants
air plant display @shoppoplarandash

Amazon

Of course, the internet’s largest e-commerce store that holds everything imaginable. Everything.

But, it can be a great option you’ll just have to look more closely combing thousands of search results to get what you’re looking for. Ugh, such a hassle sometimes!

Doing a quick search we found an adorable pineapple air plant planter from Aieve. It’s actually quite lovely and bright!

In addition to the wide range, you have Amazon to fall back on if things go south with the seller, not forgetting the speedy delivery of your plants. Seems like a good alternative after all.

MAKE SURE TO ALSO READ:

where to buy air plants
tiny pink air plant @everbeautifulskin

Ebay

Ebay’s collection is just as huge as Amazon’s (or something close) only that it’s categorized layout makes things more organized and easy to find.

For air plants, you have the following sections that are easily searchable.

  • Terrarium air plants
  • Tillandsia air plants
  • Live air plants
  • Air plant glasses

Awesome, right? All you need to do is head over to the category you need and check out the available offers.

Plus, most air plants are eligible for free shipping! Who doesn’t like FREE shipping, it’s almost standard nowadays.

Where to buy air plants
@joblessplants

Etsy

Another great marketplace for air plants. Lots of options for both plant species and price points.

Another good thing for you as a buyer, is the plethora of reviews on most of the plants /sellers. For a marketplace with so many options, this can help you quickly fish out the plants you want to bring home.

A few air plants have the free shipping eligibility. You can get lucky if the one you want falls among those.

See what Etsy has for you in Air Plants

where to buy airplants
minis @davesairplantcorner

Walmart

Clearly not as popular as the options above – looking at the reviews. Nevertheless, it’s quite packed as far as air plants are concerned so, lots of alternatives for you to pick from.

If you’re willing to have risks for your next couple of air plants, why not! Plus, free shipping is also available here – on a number of plant purchases.

Where to buy air plants
succulents & air plants in driftwood @fairy_succulents

Where to Buy Air Plants Offline

Just like the online option, offline air plants purchases are also a thing. And the experience has its own unique advantage – you get a feel of the plants before buying them. It could be something nice if that is your preference.

So, where can you buy air plants offline?

Local nurseries are the go-to places. They offer a great buying experience, as you’d have your concerns addressed one on one. Which greatly improved your chances of making the right decisions for your air plants, especially if you’re just starting out.

You get tips and tricks on how to best after your infant plants. Some nurseries can even have someone check out how you’re going on with your project and advice accordingly – on a periodic basis. Who doesn’t like a bit of hand-holding from experts?

The only caveat is that you may come up short on the specific varieties you want.

For all these options (online and offline), it’s best to consider your needs and choose the best for you. But most importantly, just make sure you have a good understanding of caring for the plants you’ll buy. Or your best purchase point won’t matter.

where to buy airplants
awesome air plant pots @carmenmcnall

If you go ahead and pick up an air plant for yourself in your beautiful home, please don’t hesitate to let us know what type it is! We’d love to hear about your experience with air plants!

Thanks for reading with us! Be sure to join the largest succulent and cacti community here if you haven’t already.

Loved learning about this type of succulents and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Head to this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complimentary guide. 

Happy planting!?

Top Terrariums for Air Plants- Different Types Of Planters

To Terrariums for Your Air Plants

You just got home from the nursery with a bunch of beautiful Tillandsias. You handpicked the best air plants that the nursery had to offer, and you’re stoked to display them in your home.

But where are you going to put them?

You can plant Tillandsia on pieces of driftwood, in hanging metal planters, and even in sea urchin shells! But our favorite place to plant them is in a glass terrarium, so today we thought we’d share our favorite ones with you. You can’t go wrong with any of the terrariums on this list—they’re all gorgeous!

Without further ado, here are the top terrariums for air plants!

Geometric Copper Terrarium

Tillandsia plant looks great in modern, geometric planters like this one! All of the edges of this glass terrarium are outlined in rose gold or copper metal depending on which design you choose. Either one is gorgeous, so you really can’t go wrong!

Our Pick
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This terrarium has a big opening, so your air plant is sure to get enough circulation in this terrarium. The size of the terrarium opening also makes it super easy for you to water your plant without removing it from their little home. Just grab a spray bottle, and mist them regularly to keep them nice and hydrated.

This Terrarium planter comes in two sizes—small or medium. Bigger is better, so we say go for the medium size. The terrarium gives you a great excuse to get more air plants if you don’t have enough to fill it!

top terrariums for air plants
Gold Geometric Planter

Light Bulb Terrariums

We think this light bulb terrarium is such a bright idea! It’s not really light bulbs, but it looks just like them and gives the same cool effect.

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08/03/2021 05:02 am GMT

This terrarium comes with jute strings that you can use to hang them from the ceiling, and they have openings in the middle that allow any plants you put in them to get enough circulation.

They’re a lot more functional than a real, repurposed light bulb would be, so it’s worth spending the money to get them! They come in a pack of three, so you get a good value on this buy. This brand also has another variety that includes a light bulb with two hole- openings— giving your air plants some extra room to grow! 

Oh before we forget! We’ve been able to collaborate with Amazon and their Prime Membership for all of our succulent lovers here on Succulent City. You can get your own 30 day free trial. You can enjoy the benefits of prime where you can continue on after your 30 days or easily unsubscribe with no charges. We’ve used it to get all of our succulent needs met! You can say we’re a tad bit addicted…

top terrariums for air plants
Lightbulb Terrariums

Hanging Glass Terrarium Kit

We love this hanging terrarium! It comes with a beautiful metal stand that has some nice scroll details. The scrolls make this terrarium look extra pretty and whimsical. It would be the perfect vehicle for a little fairy garden full of adorable plants.

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This terrarium also comes with two Tillandsia plants and some black and silver rocks, so it has everything you need to get your mini garden started! It’s a great value at $28.00 considering you get air plants and rocks, too.

For more inspiring hanging plants for your air plants and other succulents, check out our top 5 choices here!

top terrariums for air plants
Metal Stand with Glass Terrarium

Tabletop Glass Plant Terrarium

These tabletop terrariums are modern, classic and simple, which is just the way we like our planters! They’ll go with pretty much any decor because they have such a streamlined, minimalist design. They’ll really let your air plants shine, too, because they don’t have many details that will take attention away from them. Take a look!

Our Pick
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These terrariums come in a set of two. They all have the same round shape and an opening at the top that lets air in, which is great for air plants. They derive some of their nutrients from the air, so they definitely need the good airflow that these terrariums provide!

 

top terrariums for air plants
Small Desktop Terrarium

Tall Geometric Tabletop Terrarium

The shape of this tall, geometric glass terrarium kind of reminds us of geodes! It has an organic, irregular shape that looks super modern and cool.

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It comes in three sizes-small, medium, and large. Definitely go for the large size, though! It’s 9.8 inches tall, which makes it a much more striking and beautiful centerpiece than the smaller sized terrariums. It would look gorgeous in your dining room or living room table with a bunch of votive candles around it!

Our Pick
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This terrarium for air plants also comes in two different finishes. You can get it with either matte black metal or gold metal if you want a nice shiny finish.

It’s only $29.99 for the large size, which we think is a great deal. It has tons of space for your air plants and will become a real focal point of whatever room you put it in, so it’s worth splurging on!

top terrariums for air plants
Black Geometric Glass Terrarium

Teardrop Terrarium Set

We love terrariums that have unique, interesting shapes, like these! In this set, there are two teardrop-shaped and one globe-shaped terrarium for air plants. They’re all a nice size—the teardrop terrariums are 7 by 4 and the globe is 5 by 5, so you’ll be able to fit plenty of air plants in them! They have a nice, big opening that allows plenty of air to get to your Tillandsia plant, too.

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They all come with long pieces of twine that you can use to hang them. Two of them have flat bottoms, so you could also set them on your end table or coffee table and they’d look just as nice!

top terrariums for air plants
Hanging Teardrop Terrariums

Terrarium Display End Table

We saved the best terrarium for air plants for last! This end table doubles as a terrarium, and it’s just about the coolest thing we’ve ever seen! The terrarium is where the drawer would usually go, and it’s made entirely of glass, so you can see your air plants from pretty much any angle.

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The drawer is pretty deep, so you can fit a lot of Tillandsia and rocks in there! Surprisingly, the drawer also has air holes on the sides that will provide air circulation for your plants. We thought for sure that this type of terrarium would be closed, but the genius people who designed this managed to work some air holes into it!

Our Pick
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This end table has gold legs and some metal accents, but otherwise, it’s made almost entirely of glass. The almost- fully- glass design gives it a really elegant and delicate look. It would be a beautiful showpiece in almost any room in the house. We could see this table being used as a nightstand in a bedroom, or sitting next to a couch or chair as a side table. Wherever you keep it, it’s sure to be a conversation starter.

ALSO READ:

top terrariums for air plants
Desk Terrarium with Gold Accents

Those are the top terrariums for air plants according to us here at Succulent City! Which ones are your favorites?

We’re in love with that terrarium end table and it’s definitely going in our cart, we’re hoping it comes this weekend! Let us know which ones you’re going to buy in the comments section below!

Enjoyed learning about Top Terrariums for Air Plants? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about Different Types of Planters. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Happy planting! 

Comparison: Air Plants vs Succulent Plants

Air Plants vs Succulent Plants

So you’ve just been at a store and bought a plant but can’t really tell whether it’s a succulent or an air plant. You’re not alone…

Every succulent enthusiast has been there. Hordes of plant lovers mistake air plants for succulents and we totally understand why.

Both have massive decorative powers adding a natural spice to your home décor design. Quirky and unusual in looks, you’d be forgiven to think they hail from a different planet.

Despite the confusion, there is a world of difference between succulents and air plants. Several factors differentiate the two, but we’re getting ahead of ourselves here, aren’t we? What exactly are air plants and succulents?

Differences Between Air Plants and Succulents

Tillandsia, commonly known as Air plants, get most of their nutrients from the air, which is the origin of their name. They are quite a sight to behold due to their beautiful appearance. They are very easy to maintain and up-keep making them the obvious choice for many environments like offices, schools, homes, restaurants, and any other settings at all seasons.

If you want to brighten any area, then these beauties, which grow without dirt and come in various colors and sizes, will come in handy.

Air plants do not need soil to grow or depend on frequent watering like traditional plants. These make them a popular choice for indoor plants and home décor.

Air plants have thin, spiky, tendrils. Whereas succulents possess thickened and fleshy leaves or stems, a feature that helps them retain water. If you are a forgetful gardener, then these plants will do you a service as they can survive in limited water areas for extended periods. They are easy to care for and to maintain and if well handled, succulents can brighten any indoor space and make it beautiful.

Succulents can be planted alone or with a combination of their peers to bring out a stunning look. They come in a variety of colors and an attractive quality which encourages you to touch them. These beauties do not attract bugs and it is very difficult for most of them to overgrow. Their leaves may be rounded, spiky, needle-like, ruffled, or berry-like.

Distinguishing air plants from succulents can be quite confusing. If you’re in a quandary deciding whether to go for the alluring succulents or the delicate and wispy air plants, the following pointers will prove valuable.

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Air Plants

Air plants are a small group of plants made up of one genus known as Tillandsia. The genus has approximately 650 species all showing marked similarities in their phenotypes.

On the other hand, succulents are a much bigger and varied plant group. Although succulents are not recognized as a plant group on their own, they’re part of larger families in the plant kingdom. With about 25 families and tens of genera to choose from, succulents offer a wide variety for gardeners to choose from.

See a wide variety of popular succulent types here or check out the rare ones.

Growing Air Plants

Air plants are epiphytes, which means that they don’t need the soil of any kind for them to grow. Their roots are exposed and their main purpose is to attach or wrap themselves on objects to keep the plant from moving.

Since they do not need soil, all you have to do is soak them in a container of water for 30 minutes, then allow them to dry completely, preferably overnight, while placed upside down. Once dry, flip the plant to its right position then place it in its container.

On the other hand, succulents just like any other plant, need soil and water to grow. When growing them in pots, ensure that the pots have drainage holes to allow excess water to drain out.

Succulents also need direct sunlight to develop their best colors, therefore, ensure that wherever you place them, they can get access to a few hours of direct sunlight. A south or west-facing window is your best bet when growing indoor succulents.

Read our more in-depth article 7 Fantastic Succulent Care Tips .

Maintenance for Air Plants

Air plants are tough in nature which makes them pretty easy to care for and a good choice for a wide range of people. These low-maintenance plants do not need regular watering, which means you can water them once in a week.

To water them, soak them in water for anywhere between fifteen minutes and an hour, then allow them to dry completely before putting them back in their container. This is done to avoid molds.

On the other side of the ring, to keep your succulents healthy and happy, ensure that they get enough sunlight for about six hours a day. Rotate them often so as to ensure that they get sunlight on all sides to avoid leaning on one side. They tend to lean towards the sun – a phenomenon popularly known as etiolation.

They do not need to be watered too often since they have water-storage tissues that store water for a long time. However, if the weather is too dry, you may need to increase the frequency of watering. Ensure that before watering, the soil is dry as too much water can kill the plant. The best soil to use is commercial cacti mix which is well-draining to ensure the plants don’t sit on wet soil for a long time. They hate it.

(If you want to see more gold-tinted planters like the picture above, view more here).

Colors of Air Plants

Depending on species, air plants come in a variety of colors. A certain species can also have a variety of colors, so the color range is almost endless! Although air plants are typically green in color, they have beautiful multi-colored hues. Some of the colors include bright red color, violet, deep burgundy, deep red, and more.

The colors change depending on factors like sunlight and lifecycle.  Indirect sunlight is the best for air plants and the gentle morning sunlight, which is diffused by the clouds, encourages color changes.  These plants change colors during their lifecycle as they bloom and most of them change colors as they start to bloom.

Succulent plants come in a variety of colors and you can mix them to create a stunning appearance in your space. Some of the colors you can find include blue-green, variegated, white, chartreuse, red, burgundy, pink, yellow almost black, and more. To get your succulent plant to produce better colors, ensure that they get enough sunlight.

Watering Air Plants

Contrary to the thought that air plants do not need water, they actually need some water to have the right moisture for their leaves.  You can water your air plant through misting, where you use a spray bottle to sprinkle water on the plants every two days.

The other method (better) is to soak the air plants in a bowl of water for about 30 minutes.  After watering, allow the plant to dry before putting it back to its container.

While air plants have to be dipped in water and soaked, succulents only take up water from the soil. An excellent way to do this is by using the “soak and dry” method. Simply let loose a deluge and let the excess water drain off. Good thing most pots have drainage holes, so the excess water runs out without much fuss. Do not water them again until they are completely dry.

Houseplants are a great way to liven up homes and while there are many options to choose from, succulents and air plants are top on the list.

They are both low- maintenance, easy to up-keep plants which make them ideal for a majority of people. They are hard to kill and easy to use in a variety of spaces to provide a beautiful look and feel. What’s more, you can have these plants together, as the air plants only require a place to wrap their roots around for support.

Air plants can be displayed in diverse ways like hanging from the ceiling, on branches of larger houseplants, on driftwood, on the walls like art, and many more ways. Succulents can only be grown on soil which means they have to remain upright, though you can place them in different parts of the house.

Whether you’re an air plant or succulent plant fan, we hope you realize some of the major differences between these two plants now after reading this article.

ALSO READ:


Did you enjoy learning about Air Plants vs Succulent plants? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about All the Types of Succulents for Indoor & Outdoor. With this ebook you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Please let us know what you’re favorite is.

And like always, happy planting!

Definitive Guide To 5 Types of Air Plants

5 Types of Air Plants

Have you seen those plants that look like they are growing from nothing? With no soil anywhere near them and no visible roots, they are a sight-for-sore eyes as they dangle in the air from wire baskets, hooks, and chandelier-like containers! You may have spotted some with furry, silver leaves or others with glossy leaves, while some present the most vibrant colored flowers.

These tiny, floating, evergreen perennials are known as air plants.

Air plants go by the scientific name Tillandsia, and there are over 650 varieties of this species! They are originally found hanging on for dear life in the tropical climates of South and Central America as well as southern parts of the United States.

Tillandsias have the unique feature of being epiphytes– which means they do not require soil but more rely on water and air to grow. This attribute has Tillandsias attaching themselves to trees, shrubs, rocks, fences, and telephone posts, but they do not feed off the host.

These amazing, un-demanding plants are brilliant for decorating small spaces and look adorable peeking out of seashells, against a piece of driftwood, suspended on wire baskets and vases or semi-enclosed in glass baubles.

If you are looking for a plant that looks more like a pet without the hassle of cleaning up after it, here are a variety of 5 types of air plants to add a kick of personality to your home or office.

And before you learn about them, sign up for a FREE 30-day trial of Amazon’s Prime Membership! Get that FREE 2-day shipping on all your new air plant necessities! Click here to learn more and sign up today. Think of this as a thank you gift from Succulent City for keeping up with our articles.

5 Types of Air Plants
5 Types of Air Plants @carmenmcnall

Tillandsia Caput-Medusae

Wouldn’t it be fun to have a plant that is referred to as the goddess of Greek mythology, Medusa? Absolutely yes! If the name alone does not peak your interest, you will be blown away by its thick, wide silvery-green leaves that curl as they grow, giving the impression of the snakes on Medusa’s head reaching out to you.

This gorgeous, evergreen air plant is a South American native, sprouting heavily in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Its leaves appear grey-blue in color and are arranged like rosettes. The twisting leaves grow from a bulbous base, can get to 25 cm long, and have fine, grey hairs all around them.

T. Caput-Medusae pulls out all the floral stops as it blooms from spring to the beginning of summer. It produces delicate purple flowers that are about 3.2 cm long from a pale pink bract. Pups grow from the bottom of the plant after flowering and these can either be left to form a clump or can be propagated when they reach 1/3 the size of the ‘mother plant’.

A fun fact about the T. Caput-Medusae is it can be mounted sideways or upside down and it will still grow straight in the direction they are in. These beauties do not abide by the laws of gravity like many other plants do. So you can hanging them in a planter like this one, or like this one and have no issues!

When looking for a truly unique looking statement plant, look no further than T. Caput Medusa. We promise that, unlike the myth, you won’t turn into stone when you stare at it!

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Caput-Medusae @flowerheartseverywhere

Tillandsia Cyanea – Pink Quill Plant

The Tillandsia Cyanea is an indigenous resident of the rainforests of Ecuador, boasting large, bright pink bracts arranged in the shape of a paddle, that gives it the name Pink Quill plant. Its Latin name, Cyanea, means ‘blue,’ and refers to the blue-purple hue of the flowers. The leaves are long and green.

Peeping out of the sides of the fan-like quill are blue-purple-violet flowers, appearing at most 2 at a time and last for only a couple of days. The plant blooms during spring and autumn. The quill itself, which is technically the inflorescence of the plant, can stand tall for as long as 4 months, bringing a burst of color wherever it’s positioned.

This epiphytic perennial is unique because unlike most air plants, the Pink Quill can grow in soil, so you can plant it in a cool planter like this one! It has tough, dark green, grass-like leaves and can develop to be 20 inches (50 cm) high by 20 inches (50 cm) wide.

This hardy houseplant can handle dry conditions like a true champion, although it does like good air circulation and temperatures not below 7°C (45°F). This tropical stunner enjoys its moments in the sun, but direct, strong sunshine will leave the plant with sunburn.

Did you know that air plants, along with succulents, are trending in becoming decor for weddings? Take a look at this article and you’ll really be inspired!

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Cyanea – Pink Quill Plant @brandon_nxs

Tillandsia Ionantha Maxima Huamelula

Catching the eye of everyone who passes by is the Tillandsia Ionantha Maxima Huamelula or simply known as T.Maxima . When in bloom, this upright shaped plant proudly shows off bright hues of pink, purple, blue and green, while bearing a resemblance to an enchanting firework display.

The rare T.Maxima has thick, moss green, succulent leaves that burst out from a central point, with the leaves starting off dark green at the base and turning pinkish-red towards the tips when exposed to strong light. The plant generates multiple, striking purple flowers with yellow tips, producing more than 5 flowers all at once.

This air plant originates from Oaxaca in Mexico and has been known to grow up to 6 inches tall. The T.Maxima’s colorful and unusual form gives it that wow factor when mounted on a piece of bark or driftwood, if not sitting pretty in a terrarium.

Talking about terrariums, you may want to pick one!

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Ionantha Maxima Huamelula @mj.0512

Tillandsia Harrisii

The Tillandsia Harrisii is a very exceptional plant that is held dear to the hearts of many botanists, as it was named after an American air plant enthusiast named Bill Harris who was brutally murdered in Guatemala in 1985.

This distinctive air plant has silvery- grey leaves that are curled in a dense rosette along its stem and are usually falling towards one side. It is considered to be a caulescent species— which defines it as a plant that grows along a stem that is above the ground.

T.Harrissi displays a deep- red inflorescence that consists of 5 to 9 spirally positioned, purple- violet flowers with blue-violet petals and orange to red bracts. These magnificent colors create a sheer contrast to the grey-green leaves of the plant. As a slow grower, it may not produce blooms until after a year or two.

The T.Harrisii thrives under bright indirect light and away from full sunshine, so a sunny window or nook is the perfect spot for it. It also prefers moderate humidity with a good air flow to prosper. 

This easy care plant is native to Guatemala and requires a CITES permit that certifies that the plant was sustainably grown and not collected from nature.

BE SURE TO ALSO READ:

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Harrisii @pot_plants_windy

Tillandsia Stricta

The ever-popular Tillandsia Stricta is an evergreen air plant and a local resident of Trinidad, Venezuela, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Guyana and northern Argentina. The plant can take root on sand dunes as well as under tropical rainforests, making it a highly adaptable plant. According to its climate, Tillandsia Stricta may have soft flexible leaves or firmer rigid leaves and can vary in size and color.  

This air plant’s scientific name (stricta) translates to ‘erect’ and illustrates the upright habit of this plant. It also ties into the plants’ colloquial names; Upright Air Plant, Strict Tillandsia, and Erect Tillandsia.

The Tillandsia Stricta is a clump-forming perennial with short-stemmed leaves that grow into thick rosettes. This compact species has dark green leaves and produces attractive pink and white floral bracts when in bloom. The bracts hold a showy bright blue flower that sadly only lasts a day, although the bracts remain vibrant for up to 10 weeks.

Known to be one of the fastest-growing species, the Tillandsia Stricta is a decorators dream– delivering an impressive colorful clump after a few years. They can be mounted on virtually anything, giving you creative leeway to go nuts with wood, ceramics, seashells and rocks.

5 Types of Air Plants
Tillandsia Stricta @tamanhatijz

Care Tips for Air Plants

Air plants are slowly taking over the indoor plant world and you do not want to be left behind! There are some pointers to remember when taking care of air plants.

Check out our article  “Your Ultimate Guide on How to Care for Air Plants” for an extensive look!

Watering Air Plants

Too much water will kill your little one. Some air plants do well with the occasional misting once a week, especially during cold seasons. During the summer, the dunk and dry method works the best. Soak the plant for 15 minutes then shake off the excess water before putting it back in its home.

Here’s our article dedicated to watering air plants, check it out!

Sunlight for Air Plants

Air plants are naturally found hanging on to tree branches. This shows they flourish with a bit of shade or in bright, filtered or indirect light. They do not like baking under the scorching sun.

5 Types of Air Plants
Beautiful air plant display @flowers.by.roxanne

Curious to try out one of these 5 types of air plants? We would love to hear about your adventures as well as answer any questions you may have! Already own air plants? Show us your photos in our exclusive Facebook group, Succulent City Plants Lounge!

Ready to start your air plant collection? Let us help! Head over to Succulents Box, where you can sign up for monthly subscription boxes and get over 200 air plants and succulents delivered right to your door! Starting at just $5 a month, you can grow your air plant collections right from the comfort of your home! Click here to learn more and sign up today.

If you want to learn more about air plants, we have some additional articles to help! Air Plants vs Succulents, Everything You Need to Know About Air Plants, and 7 Rare Air Plants You Need in Your Home!

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Loved learning about this succulent and now inspired to add more to your collection?! (We don’t blame you) Check out Succulent City’s new line of ebooks covering topics from, “All the Types of Succulents for Indoor and Outdoor,” “Different Types of Planters,” and many more helpful in-depth ebooks. Be sure to check out this link to view our full line of ebooks and get started with our complimentary guide. 

Thanks for reading, happy planting!

Your Ultimate Guide on How to Care for Air Plants

The Ultimate Guide on How to Care for Air Plants

Racking your brains trying to come up with the best ways to care for air plants? Or just want to learn how to care for air plants before committing to buying some?

Make no mistake about it –air plants are not your ordinary kind of house plants. Although caring for air plants can’t get any easier, there are specific conditions that ensure tillandsia plants grow healthy.

Air plants are generally hard to kill and this makes even the most inexperienced gardeners seem like a gardening connoisseur when growing these plants. And that’s not all. Air plants have ridiculously few requirements not to mention the endless, creative ways to display them.

If you’ve been looking for something unusual to grace your living room décor, then you might find lots of luck with air plants. Terrariums, aeriums, bowls, seashells and even wire crafts are some of the many display ideas to show off your air plants.

So whether you’re a busy gardener or a recent house plant convert, caring for tillandsia plants is quite a snap. Let’s learn how!

But first…

What exactly are air plants?

Ultimate guide how to take care of air plants
air plant on driftwood @airplantartisan

What are Air Plants?

Air plants are naughty rule breakers. They don’t give a succulent about soil and pots with drainage holes!

These weirdos can grow anywhere as long as there is air, water and light. They’re epiphytes –a cool name to refer to plants that grow on hosts but don’t obtain nutrients from them. Air plants just use these plants for anchorage and support using their roots. Talk about clingy plants!

Yes, they got roots but they don’t use that to absorb water and nutrients. The roots are simply to attach to the host plants. So how the heck do these plants get their water and nutrients?

Leaves.

Wait, those thin, spiky tendrils? That’s right. These leaves possess fine hairs on the surface known as trichomes which actively absorb water and nutrients from the air.

Cool, right?

Also known as tillandsia, air plants hail from the tropical forests of Mexico where they grow on other plants as epiphytes. These have now been tamed and are popular living room aesthetics due to their fascinating looks. And since they don’t need dirt, they can be displayed in a myriad of ways.

Although mostly green in color, they usually come in different shades including silver which are believed to be more drought resistant. If all go well, they produce showy, teensy flowers during spring or summer.

air plant guide
pink & green air plant @tillandsia_bangkok

5 Reasons Why You Need a Tillandsia Plant

  • Your living room or office décor will love it! They’re quite unlike any plant. The spiky tendrils set them apart and makes them look just so awesome! And beautiful.
  • You don’t have to worry about what type of soil or potting mix is required. Air plants are dirt independent! Air plants can be displayed almost anywhere! Tillandsia plants are not bound by anything.
  • They’re extremely low maintenance. Any forgetful farmer can have a whale of a time growing air plants. It’s super simple!
  • Air plants take up very little space. These dainty plants economize on space and one can have many of them without worrying about where to place them.
  • Air plants pair up gorgeously with succulents and other house plants.

Caring for air plants is a breeze if you ask me. Take note of the following pointers to have outstanding tillandsia plants all around your home, office, or room.

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Ultimate guide on how to take care of air plants
hanging air plant @airplantartisan

Is Airflow Important for Air Plants?

Yes.

Air plants are created in such a way that they thrive in environments with a free flow of air. This is simply because they absorb nutrients and water from the air in their native environment.

Side note: Air plants in glass terrariums look absolutely fabulous, just take a look at our favorite golden terrarium for air plants.

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However, ensure the mouth is wide enough to ensure the plants are not suffocating inside. You definitely don’t want to end up with an empty terrarium.

Stuffing tillandsia plants in an air-deprived environment is only preparing them for failure. And hey, we’re not saying you buy a blower or a fan just for your air plants. That would be outrageous!

Just ensure they’re getting adequate airflow wherever you display them. In other words, they shouldn’t feel as if they’re claustrophobic. They’re called air plants for a reason, right?

air plant guide
garden of air plants @airplanthub

How to Water Air Plants

A common air plant faux pax is that these plants absorb all the water and nutrients from the air and so they don’t need to be watered. That’s a big fat lie.

Don’t fall for it!

Living room and office environments are nothing compared to the forests where these plants are native. The former has dry air while the latter is humid and a perfect environment for air plants to thrive in.

Watering air plants doesn’t have to be college algebra, who remembers those days? However, doing it the wrong way may kill your tillandsia plants. It’s much harder to kill these plants by under watering rather than overwatering. 

Ultimate guide to taking care of air plants
tiny air plant @reipy_s

What type of water is good for air plants?

Since tillandsia plants get most of their nutrients from water, it’s paramount to feed them with nutritious water. Of course, the best bet is rainwater as it contains a lot of nutrients and minerals. Take a look at this highly-rated rainwater collection system from Oatey if you want to give this a shot.

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Unfortunately, this might not be readily available in many households. An awesome alternative may be spring water as it contains numerous nutrients. If that seems far-reaching as well, you can go for well water, creek water, pond water or lake water. Tap water is a good option too.

Avoid distilled water because it is deprived of all minerals and nutrients, your air plant definitely doesn’t want this.

air plant guide
colorful air plant @airplanthub

Misting your air plants

Air plants growing in a dry climatic environment will benefit greatly from regular spritzing using a normal spray bottle. If you’re not normal, check out this really cool vintage glass spray bottle, it could be a great decoration item too! Keep in mind though, spritzing your air plant occasionally can’t be used as a sole watering method, there’s a better way.

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It must be complemented with other watering methods as trichomes can’t absorb adequate water from misting alone. Think about it, on hot summer days a good misting will cool us down normally but not until we get a refreshing bottle of cold water will it help dramatically.

Same thing with air plants, misting will help alleviate dehydration for only a few, use more adequate watering techniques below to compliment misting.

air plant guide
flourishing air plant @sgfloraandfauna

Dunking your air plants in water

The Perfect on-the-go watering method for busy times.

If you don’t have enough time to give your plant a soak, then this is the best way to water your plants until you get time to properly water them. Simply dunk your plants several times in a pool of water for about 20 minutes and you’re done. Using bright colored buckets like these might make the watering process more fun!

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Ultimate guide on taking care of air plants at home
air plant sprouting @ryokumouzoku

Soaking your air plant for an hour

The most recommended watering method to end up with healthy plants.

Submerge your plants in a bowl or sink full of water and let them sit for an hour. Don’t submerge blooms as they can get destroyed. After the bath, pull them out and set them upside down so that all water can dry out before returning them to their displays.

Placing them on a drying rack of some sort will make it easier to achieve full dryness, don’t let your air plant sit on a counter in its own water bath, it won’t dry properly.

Also in terms of frequency, give them a soak once a week.

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air plant guide
flowering air plant @fruitfulnmultiply

How Much Light do Air Plants Need?

Tillandsia plants prefer bright, indirect light for a few hours every day. In the jungle, these plants grow on rocks, woods and other trees away from direct sunlight. Although you can subject them to the morning or evening sun for a few hours, avoid hot direct sun as this will lead to sunburn.

Any window in your house can get the job done in regard to lighting especially west or south-facing windows. Poorly lit spaces will lead to deformed and ugly looking plants. In case natural lighting may not be sufficient, then go for artificial grow lights. We prefer these lights.

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air plant guide
family of air plants @liezestockmans

What Temperature/Climate is Good for Air Plants?

Frost and freezing cold temperatures? No way.

Air plants just won’t survive in such conditions. Let temperatures be above 40 degrees Fahrenheit and that shouldn’t be a biggie if you’re growing your tillandsia plants indoors.

Bring those outdoor plants in when temperatures go below 32 degrees.

Conversely, subjecting your air plants to extremely high temperatures will make them dry and parched, yep even air plants need adequate hydration like us too!

Ultimate guide on taking care of air plants at home
air plant terrarium @planties_in_a_twist

Is Fertilizing Tillandsia Plants Okay?

Air plants do get hungry. The air that is supposed to be a source of nutrients for them is no doubt full of pollutants and toxins. Tillandsia plants will appreciate feeding once a month or four times a year.

Use air plant-specific fertilizer or bromeliad fertilizer. You can also use diluted regular houseplant fertilizer. Add the fertilizer to the water and soak your air plants in it. This is also applicable in misting or dunking.

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Your plants won’t die if you fail to fertilize them. But if you want vivacious and healthy plants, some feeding would go a long way. Don’t be excessive on the frequency though, a little here and there goes a long way!

How Do I Display or Mount Air Plants?

There are dozens of ways to display air plants. You can stick their roots on a wood or a stone using super glue. Popular air plant designs also feature glass baubles which give a stunning aesthetic. Additionally, you can set them on seashells and wire baskets.

When displaying your plants, ensure the display surfaces are free from chemicals, rust, or toxins which may be detrimental to your plants’ health.

air plant guide
pair of air plants @arbora.verd

Do Air Plants Bloom?

Yup.

Air plants can reward you with brilliant blooms if you treat them nicely. With lots of varieties to choose from, it can be a bit tricky to offer a generalized formula to follow for these blooms to occur. Several factors come into play but mainly it all boils down to the variety and the environment.

Tillandsia plants bloom only once in their lifetime. They do this at maturity. The mother produces pups that eventually grow and flower while the mother plant dies off, unfortunately.

To get your air plants to flower, look for plants with a couple of pups. This is because the plant in its maturity stage and will soon bloom.

Air Plants Don’t Have Pests Right?

False.

Fortunately, air plants are hardy and robust and are usually not susceptible to many pests. But, you may have to deal with a few mealybugs and scale insects from time to time. But that shouldn’t be a huge deal. Simply use 70% isopropyl alcohol or neem oil to knock them off their socks!

Ultimate guide in taking care of air plants at home
mounted air plants @planties_in_a_twist

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Think you can handle the air plants now? We think so. If you have any questions be sure to ask our exclusive group at Succulent Plant Lounge, our members here help each other almost daily!

Did this article help answer your succulent-care questions? We sure hope so! If not, no worries. Succulent City is devoted to aiding all succulent lovers, and that’s why we created a line of ebook guides! Check out our in-depth tips on The Most Common Issues Amongst Succulent Growers or even Succulent Drainage Requirements today!

Let us know here on Succulent City if you plan to buy some air plants and which one you want to buy. Thanks for reading with us and of course, happy air planting!

 

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