The 7 Best Succulents for Wedding Arrangements

Flowers, move over! Succulent wedding bouquets are all the rage right now, and it’s easy to see why. Succulents come in a wide array of colors and textures and make beautiful, unique bouquets. They’re the perfect choice for brides who want something a little different than the standard rose, tulip, and peony arrangement.

Summer is the season for weddings, so we thought we’d share the best succulents for wedding arrangements with you today. If you’re getting married soon and you need some bouquet inspiration, or you just want to admire some beautiful succulent arrangements, then keep on reading!

Before we show you the 7 best succulents for wedding arrangements, enjoy a FREE 30-day trial of Amazon’s Prime Membership, on us! Consider this a gift from your friends at Succulent City. Enjoy!

7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
The 7 Best Succulents for Wedding Arrangements @shindigchic

Echeveria

Echeveria have beautiful rosettes that make them look similar to flowers. They’re one of our favorite succulents for bouquets because they’re super elegant and classy!

Echeveria come in a wide variety of colors, including blue, pink, purple, black and green, so they’ll match any color scheme. Find them on Amazon, here. Some Echeveria even have different shapes and textures, so you can make a bouquet with just this one succulent and still end up with a visually interesting result.

See the wavy succulents in the photo below? Those are ruffled Echeveria! Aren’t they beautiful? We think they kind of look like peonies and add lots of texture to that bouquet.

Echeveria look great on their own and mix well with flowers too, which is why we think they’re the perfect wedding succulent!

The 7 Best Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
cool- colored Echeveria bouquet @davidorrweddings

Aeonium

We think Aeoniums are the perfect addition to any fall bouquet. You see that gorgeous dark maroon/purple succulents in the photo below? Those are Aeoniums— get your own here, from Amazon! It has a dark, rich color that adds a little extra drama to any fall bouquet.

If that beautiful Bordeaux color won’t mesh with your color scheme, don’t worry! Aeoniums come in other colors that might suit your fancy. One of our favorite Aeoniums is pale yellow with green stripes and pink tips— check them out in the bottom of the bouquet in the photo below! It’s called Sunburst and looks gorgeous with other pastel succulents or flowers!

Read on, here, and learn more about the beautiful Aeonium succulent!

7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
are Aeoniums a fit for you? @succycrazy

Air Plants

OK, so air plants aren’t technically succulents. But they look so good mixed in with succulents and flowers that we had to tell you about them— buy your own here for your home!!

Air plants are epiphytes that grow on other plants and trees. They’re native to tropical rainforests and don’t need to be planted in soil to survive— check out our ultimate guide on how to care for air plants, here. Isn’t that amazing?

Air plants are really hardy and will hold up nicely in any wedding bouquet. They’d also do great as center pieces for receptions! Put them in beautiful terrariums, like this one. We’ve all heard horror stories of a bride’s flowers wilting right before her wedding—with air plants, that won’t happen!

In addition to being hardy, they’re pretty beautiful too! See the palm-looking plants in the bouquets, below? Those are air plants! We think they adds an unexpected touch of lush greenery and texture to that otherwise conventional bouquet of flowers. It’s definitely the star of the arrangement!

Air plants play nicely with flowers, but they can also be used by themselves to make a truly special, unique wedding bouquet. That’s why they’re one of our absolute favorite plants for weddings!

Are you just loving the idea of having a succulent bouquet? We found this faux bouquet of succulents! It’ll give you an inexpensive way to test out which varieties will make the cut of your final bouquet.

ALSO READ:

7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
simple and elegant Air Plant arrangements @airplantdesignstudio

Burro’s Tail

Burro’s Tail is such a gorgeous succulent! It’s a trailing plant, so its long stems cascade down whatever pot or planter you put it in. Each stem has lots pale green, teardrop shaped leaves. It’s one of the most visually interesting and beautiful succulents out there, so it’ll look amazing hanging down from your bouquet! Check them out in the photo below!

If you’re lucky, your Burro’s Tail might even be in bloom on your wedding day. This succulent doesn’t bloom often, but when it does it sprouts gorgeous pinkish red blooms that will add some extra prettiness to your arrangement!

We think they’d also add a special pop as part of your center pieces. Buy them when they’re small, like these, and add them to a glass terrarium, like this one!

Learn more about the glorious Burro’s Tail in our article here!

7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
add a string of Burro’s Tails to your wedding bouquet @omniasucculents

String of Pearls

String of Pearls is another trailing succulent that looks a lot like Burro’s Tail. It has leaves that are shaped like pearls instead of teardrops, so it looks like a long, beautiful strand of pearls. This plant is elegant and delicate, just like the real pearl necklace you might wear on your wedding day as your something old or borrowed!

Take a look at the arrangement below—doesn’t the String of Pearls look absolutely stunning in that bouquet?

Take a look at our Top 5 Hanging Planters that you can beautifully display your String of Pearls in, in your home!

And aside from a bouquet, they’d look beautiful as decor for your reception. Check out these cascading faux String of Pearls. Drape them over wherever you see as best fit!

cascading String of Pearls @inspiration_floristics

Pachyveria

Pachyveria is another type of succulent that has beautiful rosettes. This plant has plumper leaves than an Echeveria, though, so it gives a slightly different look to bouquets. Small Pachyverias would even look great on your groomsmen. Test them out with these faux Pachyverias.

Pachyveria come in colors from pink to blue to green, so you’re sure to find one that matches your color scheme. Our favorite Pachyveria is called Jeweled Crown. It has pale, bluish green leaves that are tinged with red around the edges. It would look gorgeous in a spring or summer bouquet!

7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
colorful Pachyveria bouquet @the.dusty.jewel

Haworthia

Haworthias are an unexpected addition to a bridal bouquet, but we think they look great! Just take a look at the Haworthia in the photo below (it’s the pointy, spotted plant in the top- center). We think it really shines in that bouquet! It adds some beautiful texture to the arrangement and makes it more unique overall. Try out your own from Amazon, here.

Haworthias come in a lot of different shapes, though, so if pointy leaves aren’t your thing, you’re sure to find one you love! Check out our article about the Zebra Plant, a variation of the Haworthia. Some look a lot like Pachyveria and have plump green leaves arranged in a rosette. Others look a lot like Aloes and have triangular leaves. Any Haworthia you choose will add something special to your bouquet, so you really can’t go wrong!

7 Succulents for Wedding Arrangements
Haworthia arrangement @cool_clayflowers

There you have it! Those are the best succulents for wedding arrangements according to us here at Succulent City. Which one is your favorite? We’re partial to the Aeonium and Burro’s Tail, but let us know which one you love in the comments section below! And if you’ve had your own succulents bouquet, share your photos with us! Share them in our Facebook group— Succulent City Plant Lounge.

Did this article inspire your inner succulent- fanatic? Check out these additional articles— Summer vs Winter Succulents- What’s the Difference, 8 Blue Succulents You Need in Your Garden, and How to Water Air Plants.

Still have some time before your wedding? We have a great opportunity for you where you can test out a variety of succulents before you make your decision for your wedding arrangements… Have you heard of Succulents Box? They offer more than 200 varieties of succulents, that are organically grown in California, along with monthly subscription boxes of fresh succulents and air plants! Starting at just $5/month, you could be on your way to creating a beautiful succulent garden, or bouquet, all from the comfort of shopping at home! Click this link to learn more about Succulents Box and start your subscription today!

Calling all succulents lovers— rookie or veteran! Succulent City has developed a line of 12 ebooks (see here), ranging on topics from indoor & outdoor succulents, essential tools, the best soil to use, and more! We even threw in a complimentary ebook to help get your succulent journey started you just have to insert your email on our front page for this. With our ebooks you’ll be a succulent guru in no time, have fun!

Happy planting, friends! ?

7 Best Succulents for Low Light Environments

So, maybe the architect who designed your house or apartment never took into consideration that one day, you might want a house plant. You have windows, but the light is never really enough to keep a sun-lover alive, with most plants screaming “Heck no, we won’t grow!”

Do you give up all together on the dream of being a plant parent?

Heck no! We won’t let it be so!

There are a variety of succulents that you can maintain in low light environments and thrive and that will brighten up your home or office, and have you feeling like a proud plant parent.

Here are 7 succulents that thrive in low light environments so that you too can get the opportunity to chant: “Heck yeah! We can grow!”

Best Succulents for Low Light Environments
Low light succulents @_abbiewilliams_

Sedum Morganianum—Burro’s Tail

Named after the Spanish word for donkey, Burro’s Tail is indigenous to Southern Mexico and Honduras. It also goes by Lamb’s Tail and Horse’s Tail. True to its name, this low light succulent does resemble a braided tail, as it cascades in an overlapping pattern from hanging pots or the edge of a balcony. You can get your burro’s tail own on Amazon! Check it out, here.

Burro’s tail have thick, fleshy leaves that look like long, fat grains of rice, in shades of dark green, green-grey and even blue-green. The leaves look like they have been dusted with a waxy, pale blue powder called epicuticular wax (say this 10 times fast), which helps the plant retain moisture and protect it from sun exposure. The plant’s luxurious stem is heavy because the leaves retain moisture and they can grow up to 24 inches long.

As pretty as the succulent looks, it can be extremely sensitive. This is not your regular touchy-feely plant.  The leaves can fall off very easily with the slightest brush, and sometimes even when you just give the plant an evil eye. This makes it an obvious and massive mistake to try and re-pot this succulent.

You will be left holding a bare stem, unfortunately.

Burro’s Tail however has minimal needs in terms of care. It only requires about 4 hours of light daily and it should not be direct sunlight, as this will make its leaves start to turn yellow. It should be watered only when the soil is completely dry. Too much water can cause the stem to rot or even kill your succulent. Think your succulent may be rotting? Check out our article “Why is My Succulent Rotting?” to find out what you can do to salvage it!

Let your Burro’s Tail brighten up your indoor space with its unique appearance, and remember to place it somewhere away from passing traffic, where you can look but not touch. Hanging planters like these will look marvelous and complement your burro’s tail quite well, without the worry of someone bumping into low light succulents!

Best Succulents for Low Light Environments
Flourishing burro’s tail @mountainorganicsbotanicals

Haworthia Cuspidata—Star Window Plant

The Haworthia cuspidata is a cross between Haworthia retusa and Haworthia cymbiformis and is prevalent to the Eastern Cape province of South Africa.

This exceptional succulent has plump, boat shaped leaves that range in color from lime green to greenish-grey. The leaves form as a tightly-packed rosette and with the right amount of light bouncing off the succulent, the leaves tends to look translucent, almost see-through, giving the plant its other name, the Star Window plant.

Some species have a white or red tip running along the outside edge of the leaves which are filled with aloe. The Star Window plant only grows between 3 and 5 inches, making it a perfectly compact plant to fit in an old tea cup, like this one!

This succulent, likes areas away from direct sunlight and should not be allowed to sit in water for any amount of time. It does well in dry, well-draining soil, and because it grows in clusters, it can be propagated easily from offsets or leaf cuttings. Take a look at our guide on how to propagate succulents successfully, here.

The aloe found in the leaves of the Haworthia Cuspidata has been known to have some therapeutic effects on sunburns, cold sores, itching and inflammation. It is also famous for being a resilient plant and is therefore safe to have with curious pets. Try out the magic of aloe, here!

Best Succulents for Low Light Environments
Baby star window plant @live.love.plant.grow

Zamioculcas Zamiifolia—ZZ Plants

The Zamioculcas zamiifolia stems from Kenya in East Africa and has been spotted sprouting roots right down to Northern parts of South Africa. This tropical perennial was commercialized by the Dutch in 1996 and is known around the world as ZZ, Zanzibar Gem, Zuzu Plant, Emerald Palm and Eternity plant.

ZZ is a stunner, boasting naturally waxy, glossy green leaves, protruding from a stem that can reach up to 3 feet long. It can occasionally be seen spotting tiny flowers that grow at the base of the stem, but these are difficult to see as they are usually covered up by the leaves.

This no-fuss plant, which is also available on Amazon here, is a popular in-house feature because it grows well, albeit slowly, in areas with low to bright indirect light. Like most succulents, you have to be careful about how much water you give ZZ. The good thing is it has an in-built indicator. When you spot the leaves starting to drop, ZZ needs more water. If the leaves start to turn yellow, ZZ has had too much water. Get yourself a beautiful, indoor planter, here, for your ZZ plant!

There are rumors that this particular plant, if ingested, could be harmful to inquisitive children and pets. Whether or not this rumor is substantiated, it is advisable to keep it at a distance from wandering fingers and mouths.

That being said, did you know that the low light succulents ZZ is an air purifier? It cleans airborne toxins, like Toluene and Xylene, from indoor air and restores oxygen levels in the room. Spend one evening with this plant and you will increase your oxygen levels, lower your blood pressure and reduce stress, all in one!

Best Succulents for Low Light Environments
ZZ plant goals @zzbotanicalandhome

Beaucarnea Recurvata—Ponytail Palm

This is the Ponytail Palm, but unlike the name, this is not a palm tree. Thanks to its ability to store water in its bulbous trunk, Ponytail Palm falls more towards succulents. The bulging stump gives root to a thinner stem that ends in long, slender, hair-like leaves that look like they have been tied in a ponytail. Yes, Ponytail Palm!

This Mexican beauty also goes by Elephant Foot and Bottle Plant while its scientific name is Beaucarnea recurvata. An enthusiastic sun lover, Ponytail Palm can grow up to 30 feet (9.14 meters) high if given the chance, and back home in Mexico, you could find some that are over 350 years old! However, this totally forgiving plant will let you control its growth movements by keeping it in low light environments.

Ponytail Palm, like any succulent, needs soil with good drainage and can last for up to 3 weeks without a drink. As tempting as it may seem to give Ponytail Pat a haircut, do not do that. The edges of the leaves will turn brown and start to dry up. For more insight on what the best potting soils are for your succulent babies, read on with this article!

Fun fact: The ASPCA approved Ponytail Palm to be non-toxic to cats, dogs, children, and horses! To ensure your pets’ safety, here’s 7 succulents that are poisonous for pets— keep your fur babies safe!

Best Succulents for Low Light Environments
Growing pony tail palm @allaboutthemroots

Gasterias—Little Warty

A distant relative of the haworthia’s and aloes, the Gasterias is a perennial succulent that is a local inhabitant of South Africa. This plant honestly has a very weird look, but then again, weird is underrated.

Gasterias has long fleshy leaves that are shaped like a tongue and have outgrowths that look like warts on the surface. This makes the leaves have a rough texture like sandpaper. This feature relates to its other names; Little Warty, Ox Tongue, Cow’s Tongue or Lawyer’s Tongue. Get your own, here!

Unlike the rosette arrangement of most aloe’s, the leaves of Gasterias grow opposite one another along a central axis and the stem tends to spiral as the plant develops, sometimes getting to 3 feet tall. Get yourself the perfect-sized pot for your Little Warty, here!

Little Warty usually blooms between spring and summer, with flowers appearing on branched inflorescences that grow pretty high above the foliage. The flowers are usually pinkish-reddish in color and have a sac-like shape that resembles a stomach – probably where the name Gasterias is derived from (Latin for stomach).

This unique looking succulent is a happy camper in cool rooms with limited sunlight and prefers well-draining, sandy soil.

Best Succulents for Low Light Environments
Perfect gasteria @smartplantapp

Schlumbergera—Holiday Cacti

Technically, this is not one plant, but 3 diverse species that are summed up under the name Schlumbergera. Don’t worry, allow us to explain.

  1. The Schlumbergera truncates is called the Thanksgiving cactus and has pointed leaf margins.
  2. The Schlumbergera bridgesii is known as the Christmas cactus has smaller, smooth, segmented edges.
  3. The Schlumbergera gaertneri is identified as the Easter cactus and has bristles at the end of each leaf.

These names are as a result of the holiday closest to the dates when their flowers bloom and the main difference being the shape of the leaves. Isn’t that pretty cool, so thoughtful if you ask me!

This spineless cactus has leaf-like pods that look like they have been stapled together, while the stems act as photosynthesis organs for the plant.

Large, bright and colourful flowers pop up from areoles on the tips of the stems and range in color to include yellow, orange, white, pink, red, scarlet, salmon and magenta. Depending on the species you choose, you could get upward facing flowers or downward facing flowers. Let your vivacious cacti steal the show, and plant them in these minimalistic pots!

Dawning from the coastal mountains of South Eastern Brazil, the Holiday Cacti do well in cool and shaded areas with high humidity levels. Thinking of brightening up your home before the holidays, this is a sure way to go.

Speaking of cacti, we’ve gotten the question “are cactus thorns poisonous?” quite a lot. To answer your curious question, we answered your question in this article!

Best Succulents for Low Light Environments
Happy holiday cactus @gowetyourplants

Haworthia Margaritifera—Pearly Dots

Known as a close cousin to the aloe plant, these small, rare beauties are a sight to behold.

Growing in tightly packed, stem-less rosettes, the Haworthia Margaritifera has chunky, blue-green leaves that are covered all over in small white bumps, giving the succulent a distinct appearance that you cannot miss. These bumps led to nick names such as Pearly Dots, Pearl Plant and Cushion Aloe.

This succulent tends to bloom early in the summer and produces tiny, brownish-white flowers. They can grow to be about 4 inches tall and 6 inches wide. Pearly Dots is not a picky plant and it prefers medium to indirect light with minimal watering. It should never sit in water, and like most succulents, it does well in either sandy soil or a cactus mix.

This South African native looks stunning in unusual containers, maybe one like this, and can be gifted to anyone starting out as a green thumb.

ALSO READ:

Best Succulents for Low Light Environments
Magnificent pearly dots @flowers.cactus

Are you excited to complete your home and office with these new succulents?!

Before you do… We wanted to share that we’ve teamed up with Amazon. And to celebrate, they’re offering a FREE 30-day trial of their Amazon Prime Membership! That means free 2-day shipping on THOUSANDS of items— perfect time to stock up on all your new succulent gear! Click this link to find out more and sign up today.

And don’t forget, we’re on Pinterest! For gorgeous and inspiring succulent videos, like propagation guides and jaw-dropping gardens, check it out here!

Enjoyed learning about the 7 Best Succulents for Low Light Environments? If so, you’ll really enjoy the ebook about Best Lighting Practices for Succulent Growth. With this ebook, you’ll find yourself more detailed answers that’ll help your succulent grow even better! With thousands of succulent lovers enjoying our ebooks, you don’t want to miss out on what works the best to grow your succulents.

Thanks for reading, happy planting my friends!

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