The Red Dragon Flower Succulent ‘Huernia Schneideriana’

Huernia Schneideriana Image

Meet the Red Dragon Flower, also known as Huernia Schneideriana! It’s a cool succulent with unique star-shaped flowers and pointy stems. This plant is easy to care for, likes bright light, and does not need much water. Let’s dive into the simple and fun world of the Red Dragon Flower and learn how to keep it happy and thriving!

Overall Appearance

Huernia Schneideriana is a neat plant with chubby stems shaped like a triangle. Each steam carries a green or brownish-green color. These stems are thick but really good at holding water, which is helpful for the plant when it doesn’t rain much. When this succulent gets older, the stem may look slightly different from the beginning day.

Plant Physical Part of Huernia Schneideriana Image

The flowers of Huernia Schneideriana are like little stars. They have cool designs on their petals, kind of a star. Their colors can be red, brown, or yellow. The flowers of Huernia Schneideriana have a special smell that might not be very nice to some people. It’s like an old or not-so-pleasant smell, not the sweet kind you usually get from flowers. However, this fragrance isn’t too strong, just unique.

The roots of Huernia Schneideriana play a role in holding the succulent. Instead of growing out of the soil, they stay hidden beneath the surface. Thanks to this growth pattern, these roots can easily grab water as well as nutrients the succulent needs. Each root also acts like a tiny sponge, storing water to help the plant survive during dry times.

Follow Succulent City on Facebook, Pinterest & Instagram for more informative & interesting content about succulents & cacti 🙂 Join the discussions at our Facebook Group, “Succulent City Plant Lounge.” Happy planting, and live the moment!

Images From The Community

Care Guide

Light: Huernia Schneideriana thrives in bright, indirect light. It still can be happy when you put it under some direct sunlight but not intense sunlight for a long time. If you place it inside your home, select a spot with plenty of light, maybe a window. Let it receive at least 6 hours of sunlight per day.

Temperature: Maintain a warm and consistent temperature for Huernia Schneideriana. It prefers temperatures between 15°C to 27°C during the day and doesn’t like temperatures below 50°F (10°C) at night.

Watering: This succulent doesn’t need frequent watering. The soil must be dry before you water. When you water, do it thoroughly, but ensure you see the water flow out of the drainage hole. However, please pay attention to how much water you let it take in to avoid overwatering. You also adjust the frequency based on your succulent situation and growing conditions.

Soil: Use well-draining soil for Huernia Schneideriana. A cactus or succulent mix works well. This prevents water from pooling around the roots and helps mimic the plant’s natural habitat.

Humidity: Huernia Schneideriana is adaptable to arid conditions, so it doesn’t require high humidity. Average indoor humidity levels are generally suitable. Good air circulation around the plant is beneficial.

Fertilization: You can use a balanced, diluted fertilizer every 4-6 weeks when the succulent grows most strongly. However, avoid fertilizing during the dormant season in fall and winter.

Pests: While this succulent is generally resistant to pests, pay attention to common succulent pests like mealybugs or aphids. Treat any infestations promptly with insecticidal soap or neem oil.

DO YOU KNOW? Caring (propagating, pruning/trimming, beheading, watering, …) is a set of skills that is widely applicable to succulents. Read the in-depth guide here >>

Richard Miller – Succulent City

Propagation

To make more Huernia Schneideriana plants:

  1. Take a healthy piece of a stem from the main plant.
  2. Let the cut end dry a bit.
  3. Plant it in soil, not too deep, and put it in a spot with light but not direct sun.
  4. Water it a little, not too much.
  5. After a few weeks, check if it has roots by gently pulling on it. If it resists, that means roots are there!

Once it’s got roots, you can move it to a bigger pot if you want. Remember, it takes time, so be patient and try a few cuttings to boost your chances. It is best to do this when the plant is growing a lot.

Before you leave …

Alright, what do you think about Huernia Schneideriana? It is incredible, right!!! Those star flowers, stems, and roots, all together, make it so unique in your space. It’s like the low-maintenance chill friend. Taking care of it is a breeze. And, oh, did I mention the unique smell? So, invite Huernia Schneideriana into your space and enjoy planting!

Succulent City chief editor

ABOUT ME

Succulent City

Hey everyone! Welcome to Succulent City! We are all about succulents, cacti, and a bit about air plants. Ten years back, in 2013, we began the journey with succulents. It started as a simple hobby, crafting and selling charming succulent-themed pins and decorations. But as time passed, our fascination with these remarkable plants grew, and we gained extensive knowledge about them. Therefore, Succulent City is the blog as you see it is now. Enjoy your visit and happly planting!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Posted in Succulents