All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents

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Stonecrop succulents, also known as Sedums like this one, are a hardy little group of plants that are perfect for outdoor gardens! They can survive in below freezing temperatures, poor soil conditions, and hot, sunny weather. No matter what growing zone you live in or where you plant them in your garden, they’ll be able to thrive!

Stonecrop succulents come in colors like green, red, purple, and yellow. They usually produce yellow, pink, or white blooms that attract birds and butterflies. They’re just as pretty as they are hardy, so they’re fantastic plants to have in your garden!

Caring for sedums is pretty easy, but you’ll still need a few essential tips—so keep reading!

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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Origins

Most varieties of sedum are native to Europe and Asia, so they can handle a temperate climate. They’re grown in many gardens in North American today because of their cold hardiness and pretty appearance. They have beautiful, showy flowers and glossy leaves in colors like green, blue, maroon, purple, orange, and gold.

Most varieties of sedum are creeping, which means that they spread out as they grow and fill up bare spaces in gardens. Some varieties, though, are tall. Tall varieties grow up instead of out and get to be about 2 or 3 feet high. They’re prized for their beautiful flowers!

Caring for Sedums

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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By now we’ve probably convinced you that you need some beautiful stonecrop succulents in your garden, so now you need to learn how to care for them! Well, we’ve got your back! You’ll have no problem caring for sedums even if you have a black thumb as long as you follow these tips.

Soil Requirements

The easiest way to kill a sedum is to let it sit in water! Planting sedums in porous soil that drains quickly helps prevent water from pooling and damaging their roots.

If you’re planting your stonecrops in pots, make sure that you use ones with drainage holes and fill them with a porous succulent soil.

If you’re planting stonecrop succulents out in your garden, you should test the soil to make sure it drains quickly enough before you put the succulents in the ground. To do this, dig a hole that’s a foot deep and fill it with water. If the water drains in thirty minutes or less, your soil is ready for your stonecrops! If not, you’ll need to mix three inches of something gritty, like perlite or sand, into the soil to make it more porous.

Water Requirements

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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Overwatering is another major cause of death for stonecrop succulents! Stonecrop succulents that are kept outside don’t need a whole lot of water. During the winter when they’re dormant, they may not need any water at all if your area gets rainfall. During the spring, summer, and fall, you’ll only need to water them once a week if they’re a tall variety. Creeping sedums can get by on even less water.

If you’re growing sedum indoors, your plants will need more water than ones kept outside. We recommend that you water your sedums about once a week during the spring through fall. During the winter, cut back on watering your plants. Once every three to four weeks should be sufficient—you only want to water them enough to keep their leaves from drying out and puckering.

Before you water your sedums, make sure the soil is completely dry. You can test this by sticking your finger about an inch deep into the soil. If it’s wet, put down the watering can! If it feels dry, your succulent is thirsty and needs a drink, so proceed with watering!

You should follow the soak and dry method when watering your sedums. To do this, grab your watering can and pour water onto the soil until it starts running out of the drainage holes of the pot. If your sedums are outdoors, pour enough water on the soil until it feels wet about an inch down. Don’t water your plants again until the soil feels completely dry to avoid overwatering them!

Light and Temperature Requirements

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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Outdoors, sedums can thrive no matter where you put them in the garden. You can plant them in partial shade or full sun and they’ll do well. Here’s some great outdoor pots if you don’t plan to have them in the regular ground or soil. Our team member has one of these bad boys actually!

Indoors, sedums need bright sunlight, so keep them near the sunniest window in your home or under a grow light.

As for temperature, sedums are pretty hardy. Most varieties can survive in below freezing temperatures of negative twenty or thirty degrees, so they’re the perfect outdoor succulents for cold growing zones. No need for ridiculous plant covers like this, nope!

Fertilizer Requirements

Stonecrops don’t absolutely need fertilizer. Since they can survive in poor soil conditions, they don’t need extra nutrients from fertilizer to keep growing. If you want to save money or time, it’s a step you can skip.

But if you want your stonecrops to be the healthiest they can be (we know you do!), then they’ll benefit from a few applications of diluted fertilizer during the spring, summer or fall.

Diluting water soluble fertilizer is easy—just use half as much fertilizer as the directions call for. So if the back of the box says to dissolve 1 tablespoon of fertilizer in a gallon of water, you should only use ½ tablespoon.

If you’d rather not use chemical fertilizer, you can apply a layer of organic compost to the soil once during the fall.

Propagating Sedum

Succulent propagation can seem kind of intimidating, but propagating a sedum is super easy! All you have to do to be able to grow brand new plants is take a couple of stem cuttings. We promise your sedum won’t even notice those stems are missing!

To take some cuttings, grab a sharp garden knife and cut the stem of your sedum below the leaves. You want the whole cutting to be at least three inches long, so keep that in mind when you’re cutting the stem.

Any leaves on the bottom inch of the cutting should be stripped, and then the cutting should be planted in some moist succulent soil. You should keep the soil just barely moist at all times over the next week or two. You can mist the soil with a spray bottle like this to keep it damp. Once the cuttings take root you can water them normally, just like you would any other sedum.

Make sure you keep your cuttings in a place with bright but indirect sunlight. Sedums can’t handle harsh sunlight or freezing temps until they’ve matured and grown a bit!

All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents
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Now that you know all about stonecrop succulents, are you going to plant any in your garden? Let us know in the comments section below!

If you already have these and want to ask specific questions in how to care for them even more, be sure to ask our exclusive members for TIPS and TRICKS that they find to be super useful. (It helps our team members a lot).

Happy planting! ?

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All You Need to Know About Stonecrop Succulents